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The Week contest - The new bacon
What "consumer-friendly" name should the pork industry give bacon?
A chop by another name wouldn't taste as sweet.
A chop by another name wouldn't taste as sweet.
ThinkStock/iStockphoto
W

elcome to "What Next?", The Week's contest about current events.

Click here for the results of the previous contest: Airline fees

Last week's question: The pork industry has received approval to rename various cuts to make them more "consumer-friendly"—pork chops can be called "porterhouse chops" and pork butt will be called "Boston roast." What should they call bacon?

 

Results

THE WINNER: Filet pignon
James Smith, Mill Valley, Calif.

SECOND PLACE: Kevin
Michael Lautieri, Conyers, Ga.

THIRD PLACE: Hambrosia
Sarah Gaymon, Gambrills, Md.


HONORABLE MENTIONS:

Nirvana
Robert Klingon, New York City


The non-kosher delight
Kenneth R. Updegrove, Cedaredge, Colo.

Happy fat
Ashley Kelly, Sacramento

Six degrees of flavor
Jean Howard, Dallas, Ga.

Reason to live strips
Brett Howard, Washington, D.C.

Virginia slims
Martin Schnuit, Glen Burnie, Md.

Unicorn meat
Shara Lawson, Lithia, Fla.

New pork strip steak
Audrey Nagel, Burlington Township, N.J.

Boardough
Rick Haynes, Boynton Beach, Fla.

Manna
Ken Oxford, Severna Park, Md.

God’s gift to man
Chris Fisher, Jeffersonville, Ind.

God particle
Paul Knauer, San Jose

Chateaubacond
Benjamin Steger, Fairfax, Va.

Meat thins
Jeff Cox, Shawnee, Okla.

Patriot strips
Scott Selinger, Portland, Ore.

The morning white meat
Josh Jackson, Merrimac, Mass.

Nice crispies
Nancy Bentley, Ripley, Ohio

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