The Week: Most Recent Lifestyle Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/lifestyleMost recent posts.en-usTue, 19 Aug 2014 14:55:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Lifestyle Posts from THE WEEKTue, 19 Aug 2014 14:55:00 -0400How to make duck fat&ndash;fried chickenhttp://theweek.com/article/index/266582/how-to-make-duck-fatfried-chickenhttp://theweek.com/article/index/266582/how-to-make-duck-fatfried-chicken<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62001_article_main/w/240/h/300/lucky-chicagoans-can-skip-the-cooking-and-go-straight-to-the-slurping-turtle-for-a-taste.jpg?208" /></P><p><br /></p><p>"I love chicken skin," says Takashi Yagihashi.</p><p>The Chicago-based chef and native of Japan is leaning over a gurgling pot, cheerfully extolling the virtues of crisp-skinned fried chicken.</p><p>(<strong>More from <em>Tasting</em><em> Table</em>: </strong>Buttermilk-brined fried chicken)</p><p>Today he's making <em>karaage</em> &mdash; Japanese-style fried chicken &mdash; with a twist: The glistening stuff in the pot is no mere cooking oil but lovely golden-rendered duck fat (see the recipe).</p><center><br /></center><div class="photo_credit" ><em>The master at work: Making a crunchy slaw and frying the chicken</em></div><p>It's easy to see why the dish is in constant demand at Slurping Turtle, his izakaya/noodle...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/266582/how-to-make-duck-fatfried-chicken">More</a>By Adam SachsTue, 19 Aug 2014 14:55:00 -0400The secret to handling pressure like astronauts, Navy SEALs, and samuraihttp://theweek.com/article/index/264544/the-secret-to-handling-pressure-like-astronauts-navy-seals-and-samuraihttp://theweek.com/article/index/264544/the-secret-to-handling-pressure-like-astronauts-navy-seals-and-samurai<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61062_article_main/w/240/h/300/calm-and-collected.jpg?208" /></P><p><br /></p><p>We all make a lot of bad decisions.</p><p>With careers:</p><p >More than half of teachers quit their jobs within four years. In fact, one study in Philadelphia schools found that a teacher was almost two times more likely to drop out than a student. [<em>Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work</em>]</p><p>In our jobs:</p><p >A study showed that when doctors reckoned themselves "completely certain" about a diagnosis, they were wrong 40% of the time. [<em>Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work</em>]</p><p> </p><p>And in our personal lives:</p><p >&hellip;an estimated 61,535 tattoos were reversed in the United States in 2009...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/264544/the-secret-to-handling-pressure-like-astronauts-navy-seals-and-samurai">More</a>By Eric BarkerTue, 19 Aug 2014 10:30:00 -0400Why is Drew Barrymore teaming up with Walmart?http://theweek.com/article/index/266415/why-is-drew-barrymore-teaming-up-with-walmarthttp://theweek.com/article/index/266415/why-is-drew-barrymore-teaming-up-with-walmart<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0123/61930_article_main/w/240/h/300/barrymores-girl-power-prerogative-is-lost-in-walmart.jpg?208" /></P><p dir="ltr">Aspiring stars should pay close attention to Drew Barrymore's career. As nearly every magazine profile of Barrymore points out, she is one of the most likable actresses around. She strikes an image that comes off as goofy and earnest&mdash;a product of her laid-back California bohemian vibe; a commitment to family, friends, and charity; and the gravitas she earned by healing from a troubled childhood right in front of our eyes.</p><p dir="ltr">Barrymore is the kind of star women think could be their friend. Some of us even feel like she <em>is</em> our friend. All the reason then to find her ongoing collaboration with...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/266415/why-is-drew-barrymore-teaming-up-with-walmart">More</a>By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>Tue, 19 Aug 2014 06:05:00 -0400Why I give money to homeless peoplehttp://theweek.com/article/index/266548/why-i-give-money-to-homeless-peoplehttp://theweek.com/article/index/266548/why-i-give-money-to-homeless-people<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0123/61978_article_main/w/240/h/300/pay-it-forward.jpg?208" /></P><p>The first thing I see most mornings as I stumble sleepily from the subway to begin my jaunt to work are homeless people sitting in the station with outstretched cups, right at the top of the escalator.</p><p>Near my office in downtown Washington, D.C., homeless people are a common sight. They seem to fit into every nook and cranny of the area buildings. They sleep at night in the doorways of businesses, usually with makeshift tents constructed using newspaper and cardboard.</p><p>I don't work in a downtrodden neighborhood. My office is just off K Street. The White House is only a few blocks away. Homeless...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/266548/why-i-give-money-to-homeless-people">More</a>By <a href="/author/w-james-antle-iii" ><span class="byline">W. James Antle III</span></a>Tue, 19 Aug 2014 06:03:00 -0400How to make marshmallow fluff from scratchhttp://theweek.com/article/index/265871/how-to-make-marshmallow-fluff-from-scratchhttp://theweek.com/article/index/265871/how-to-make-marshmallow-fluff-from-scratch<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0123/61673_article_main/w/240/h/300/mmm-fluff.jpg?208" /></P><p><br /></p><p>I was baking recently, and the recipe required about two jars of marshmallow fluff. I added it to my grocery list, but after checking two or three stores near my apartment, I came up empty. How is it possible that fluff is so hard to find? No matter: I knew I had seen it made from scratch somewhere before. I did a quick search on my phone and was pleased to learn that the only ingredient I needed that I didn't already have at home was corn syrup.</p><p>I know, I know. Corn syrup is bad for you! Corn syrup blah blah blah. Look, we all enjoy candy and ice cream and the occasional cheese fry or bag of...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/265871/how-to-make-marshmallow-fluff-from-scratch">More</a>By Sydney KramerMon, 18 Aug 2014 16:08:00 -0400The post-traumatic stress of home burglaryhttp://theweek.com/article/index/266360/the-post-traumatic-stress-of-home-burglaryhttp://theweek.com/article/index/266360/the-post-traumatic-stress-of-home-burglary<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0123/61903_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-sense-of-vulnerability-can-be-hard-to-shake.jpg?208" /></P><p><br /></p><p>May might be spring in most places, but it's definitely summer in southern Mississippi. We got back to our friend's place a little past midnight, having walked across the city from our favorite bar, where, surrounded by close friends, we'd just celebrated our imminent going away. Tomorrow, even though it still didn't seem real, would be our last day in the United States before we moved to Germany. We were already living out of suitcases, drunk on the mix of nostalgia and excitement you experience when you realize your life is about to change. I remember seeing the muddy boot print on the side...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/266360/the-post-traumatic-stress-of-home-burglary">More</a>By Brian BlickenstaffMon, 18 Aug 2014 13:47:00 -0400The growing quandary of dark tourismhttp://theweek.com/article/index/266166/the-growing-quandary-of-dark-tourismhttp://theweek.com/article/index/266166/the-growing-quandary-of-dark-tourism<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0123/61819_article_main/w/240/h/300/visitors-tour-through-former-concentration-camp-auschwitz-in-poland.jpg?208" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Visits to the furnaces of Auschwitz, the killing fields of Cambodia, and the area surrounding Chernobyl &mdash; all are examples of dark tourism, trips to sites of episodes of human violence. Think of them as morbid holidays, or something a bit less traditional than spending a week at an all-inclusive resort in the Bahamas. Back in 2011, Michael T. Luongo described the then-upcoming National September 11 Memorial &amp; Museum as yet another example of dark tourism. "To visit New York's ground zero is clearly a different experience from Times Square or Central Park," he wrote.</p><p>Just about every...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/266166/the-growing-quandary-of-dark-tourism">More</a>By Paul HiebertMon, 18 Aug 2014 07:15:00 -0400House hunting: 7 homes in wine countryhttp://theweek.com/article/index/266358/house-hunting-7-homes-in-wine-countryhttp://theweek.com/article/index/266358/house-hunting-7-homes-in-wine-country<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0123/61901_article_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?208" /></P><p ><br /><strong> Sonoma, California.</strong> An organic farm and vineyards surround this four-bedroom house built on a 0.5-acre lot in 2010. The interior features a first-floor master, hardwood floors, and a chef's kitchen. The wings of the home are connected by multiple terraces, which create outdoor living spaces.</p><p> </p><p ><br /> <br />The exterior also includes an in-ground pool and an outdoor barbecue. $5,200,000. Daniel Casabonne and Ginger Martin, Wine Country Brokerage/Sotheby's International Real Estate, (707) 935-2288.</p><p ><br /><br /> **</p><p ><br /><br /> <br /><strong>Bend, Oregon.</strong> This modern home is in central Oregon, which was officially recognized as a wine region...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/266358/house-hunting-7-homes-in-wine-country">More</a>By The Week StaffMon, 18 Aug 2014 06:08:00 -0400The secret life of a con manhttp://theweek.com/article/index/266437/the-secret-life-of-a-con-manhttp://theweek.com/article/index/266437/the-secret-life-of-a-con-man<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0123/61935_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-con-game-is-hardly-just-a-relic-of-the-past-or-cinematic-trope.jpg?208" /></P><p><br /></p><p>GM once spent three weeks casing a mother of three, learning everything he could about her life, routine, and preferences. When he finally found a way in, he robbed her of over $1,000. It was a good score. And because she was a piece of shit, GM concluded, the crime was justifiable.</p><p>He later found his research was flawed, however. The woman's husband had recently left her, burdening her with the care of three children. And she was in financial trouble. She wasn't so bad after all. So he gave the money back. Well, half.</p><p>"She deserved half," says GM, taking a sip of iced coffee.</p><p>"Did you drop...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/266437/the-secret-life-of-a-con-man">More</a>By Dustin GrinnellSun, 17 Aug 2014 12:00:00 -0400How to throw a fantastic dumpling party at homehttp://theweek.com/article/index/266254/how-to-throw-a-fantastic-dumpling-party-at-homehttp://theweek.com/article/index/266254/how-to-throw-a-fantastic-dumpling-party-at-home<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0123/61843_article_main/w/240/h/300/hard-at-work.jpg?208" /></P><center><br /></center><p>If we played by the rules, we'd have a dumpling party in February, when families and friends traditionally gather to wrap, boil, and devour dumplings as they ring in the Chinese New Year. But we're going to follow the lead of the Cheng sisters, Hannah and Marian, who grew up partying with dumplings all year long.</p><p>(<strong>More from <em>Tasting Table</em></strong>: Come fry with me)</p><p>A few weeks ago, the sisters opened Mimi Cheng's, a bright, whitewashed restaurant in New York City's East Village with a tiny menu (three savory dumplings, one sweet) &mdash; and a line out the door. They named the shop after their mother...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/266254/how-to-throw-a-fantastic-dumpling-party-at-home">More</a>By Tejal RaoSun, 17 Aug 2014 11:00:00 -0400