The Week: Most Recent Politics Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/politicsMost recent posts.en-usMon, 22 Sep 2014 16:50:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Politics Posts from THE WEEKMon, 22 Sep 2014 16:50:00 -0400400,000 Americans marched for climate justice. Now what?http://theweek.com/article/index/268556/400000-americans-marched-for-climate-justice-now-whathttp://theweek.com/article/index/268556/400000-americans-marched-for-climate-justice-now-what<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62878_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-support-appears-to-be-there.jpg?209" /></P><p>I was at the People's Climate March in New York City on Sunday. It was mind-bogglingly huge.</p><p>The gathering was so big that the pre-march starting line-up stretched a mile and a half, from Columbus Circle at 59th Street all the way up to 86th Street, with numerous cross-streets jammed with participants, too. For people standing at 77th Street, it took more than an hour and a half for the parade to even get moving. The event was so big that when I finally reached the end of the parade route at 40th Street and 11th Avenue &mdash; three miles and five hours later &mdash; and turned back to rest my...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268556/400000-americans-marched-for-climate-justice-now-what">More</a>By <a href="/author/ryan-cooper" ><span class="byline">Ryan Cooper</span></a>Mon, 22 Sep 2014 16:50:00 -0400Watch out, Rand: You're backing yourself into a Clintonian foreign-policy traphttp://theweek.com/article/index/268490/watch-out-rand-youre-backing-yourself-into-a-clintonian-foreign-policy-traphttp://theweek.com/article/index/268490/watch-out-rand-youre-backing-yourself-into-a-clintonian-foreign-policy-trap<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62856_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-anti-interventionist-paul-is-having-a-hard-time-grappling-with-the-need-to-intervene-in-iraq.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">When it comes to national security, Rand Paul is having a tough time trying to manage the conflict between his own convictions and good politics.</p><p class="p1">For years, the junior senator from Kentucky and potential 2016 GOP presidential candidate has carefully and consistently built a reputation as an anti-interventionist on foreign policy. He's done that at a time when the Iraq War was unpopular, and when military operations like the U.S. intervention in Libya have turned into a disaster. It's been a political winner among the young, libertarians, and other huge swaths of the country that are sick of America...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268490/watch-out-rand-youre-backing-yourself-into-a-clintonian-foreign-policy-trap">More</a>By <a href="/author/michael-brendan-dougherty" ><span class="byline">Michael Brendan Dougherty</span></a>Mon, 22 Sep 2014 06:03:00 -0400Why does Fareed Zakaria still have a job?http://theweek.com/article/index/268453/why-does-fareed-zakaria-still-have-a-jobhttp://theweek.com/article/index/268453/why-does-fareed-zakaria-still-have-a-job<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62832_article_main/w/240/h/300/fareed-zakaria-is-a-widely-respected-journalist-with-a-really-bad-borrowing-habit.jpg?209" /></P><p>For a month now, anonymous investigative journalists @crushingbort and @blippoblappo have been building a devastating case at their site Our Bad Media that CNN and <em>Washington Post</em> star Fareed Zakaria has committed dozens of acts of plagiarism and intellectual dishonesty. But Zakaria has not been hounded out of his job and shamed in the public square, as one would expect. Instead, he continues to go about his business as if nothing happened, revealing a disturbing double standard in the media industry.</p><p>The story begins back in 2012, when Zakaria was caught lifting from <em>The</em> <em>New Yorker</em>'s Jill Lepore...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268453/why-does-fareed-zakaria-still-have-a-job">More</a>By <a href="/author/ryan-cooper" ><span class="byline">Ryan Cooper</span></a>Mon, 22 Sep 2014 06:02:00 -0400Is the president's ISIS campaign even legal?http://theweek.com/article/index/268414/is-the-presidents-isis-campaign-even-legalhttp://theweek.com/article/index/268414/is-the-presidents-isis-campaign-even-legal<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62825_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-precedents-obama-sets-will-be-the-foundation-upon-which-future-presidents-wage-military.jpg?209" /></P><p><em>The Atlantic</em>'s Conor Friedersdorf says I give President Obama too much leeway to wage war without having to explain why. That's not exactly my position.</p><p>For the record, I think the president should ask Congress for its approval on his ISIS campaign. I also think the 2002 Authorization For the Use of Military Force against al Qaeda and associates should be declared null and void. These are not political judgments; they are judgments based on my evaluation of what seem to be the most persuasive arguments. And I am open to revising them.</p><p>I also think that the president's constitutional authority...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268414/is-the-presidents-isis-campaign-even-legal">More</a>Marc AmbinderFri, 19 Sep 2014 09:15:00 -0400The Tea Party has its own immigration problem: Cubahttp://theweek.com/article/index/268365/the-tea-party-has-its-own-immigration-problem-cubahttp://theweek.com/article/index/268365/the-tea-party-has-its-own-immigration-problem-cuba<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62798_article_main/w/240/h/300/sen-ted-cruzrsquos-father-rafael-right-was-lucky-enough-to-come-to-the-us-legally.jpg?209" /></P><p>Comprehensive immigration reform died a slow death in the 113th Congress, the final nail in its coffin being the surprise primary loss of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.). Immigration wasn't the only factor in Cantor's loss to a Tea Party challenger, or even the central factor, but it was enough to spook House Republicans from even taking up the immigration bill that passed with bipartisan support in the Senate last year.</p><p>The fear among House Republicans is that if they support a bill with any path to citizenship &mdash; no matter how long and tenuous &mdash; for immigrants in the U.S...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268365/the-tea-party-has-its-own-immigration-problem-cuba">More</a>By <a href="/author/peter-weber" ><span class="byline">Peter Weber</span></a>Fri, 19 Sep 2014 06:06:00 -0400What the Federal Reserve could learn from World of Warcrafthttp://theweek.com/article/index/268379/what-the-federal-reserve-could-learn-from-world-of-warcrafthttp://theweek.com/article/index/268379/what-the-federal-reserve-could-learn-from-world-of-warcraft<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62805_article_main/w/240/h/300/get-in-the-game-janet-yellen.jpg?209" /></P><p>A persistent conservative trope during the Obama years runs like this: printing money necessarily causes inflation. Dredged out of the swamps of Austrian economics, it gained wide conservative credence when Obama took office in early 2009 and continues to this day.</p><p>This is not the case. But the idea does have a certain surface plausibility. More dollars means each dollar is a little less valuable, right? And that means prices of things should rise. The intuitive appeal of this idea probably accounts for why the online show Extra Creditz invoked it in its analysis of the inflation economics of...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268379/what-the-federal-reserve-could-learn-from-world-of-warcraft">More</a>By <a href="/author/ryan-cooper" ><span class="byline">Ryan Cooper</span></a>Thu, 18 Sep 2014 13:49:00 -0400The Republican who should write Obama's speecheshttp://theweek.com/article/index/268339/the-republican-who-should-write-obamas-speecheshttp://theweek.com/article/index/268339/the-republican-who-should-write-obamas-speeches<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62783_article_main/w/240/h/300/if-only.jpg?209" /></P><p>Finally, an honest answer from the U.S. government about the likelihood of Americans ever fighting on the ground in Iraq against ISIS:</p><p >We're going to defeat ISIS. That's what we're going to do. We're going to do it together. We're going to bring in coalition forces. We don't think it's going to need big units, like the 101st Airborne Division, the 1st MEF, we don't believe that, but it may require our special capabilities, soldiers, and intelligence officials, going downrange, if you will, to make sure that we are effective in what we're going to do.</p><p>Kudos to the presidential speechwriter for...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268339/the-republican-who-should-write-obamas-speeches">More</a>Marc AmbinderThu, 18 Sep 2014 07:24:00 -0400Mike Huckabee's head-scratching advice to Christian votershttp://theweek.com/article/index/268280/mike-huckabees-head-scratching-advice-to-christian-votershttp://theweek.com/article/index/268280/mike-huckabees-head-scratching-advice-to-christian-voters<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62761_article_main/w/240/h/300/poverty-and-hard-decisions-go-hand-in-hand.jpg?209" /></P><p>On Friday, former Arkansas governor and Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee dispensed some dubious advice to voting Christians:</p><p >I would urge pastors to get in the pulpit and call people to Biblical truth as it relates to the issue of life and marriage, and even the issue of stewardship, and never be apologetic and say, 'Vote the Bible in your own heart.'[&hellip;] I hear people say sometimes, 'Vote your pocketbook.' Well, if you vote the scripture, you'll ultimately benefit your pocketbook, because everything about the economy that's wrong would be fixed if people had a Biblical understanding...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268280/mike-huckabees-head-scratching-advice-to-christian-voters">More</a>By <a href="/author/elizabeth-stoker-bruenig" ><span class="byline">Elizabeth Stoker Bruenig</span></a>Thu, 18 Sep 2014 06:09:00 -0400The Obama administration's nonstop incoherence on ISIShttp://theweek.com/article/index/268239/the-obama-administrations-nonstop-incoherence-on-isishttp://theweek.com/article/index/268239/the-obama-administrations-nonstop-incoherence-on-isis<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62740_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-blunders-continue.jpg?209" /></P><p>One has to wonder just how often members of President Barack Obama's national security team talk with each other. The federal government is famously gigantic, but the president's Cabinet is not, particularly if you narrow it to the inner circle that crafts military and national security strategy. One would assume that it wouldn't be all that difficult to prepare a coherent approach to an international crisis, particularly as Cabinet members testify before Congress amidst deep skepticism of the White House's strategy to destroy the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS, or in the administration...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268239/the-obama-administrations-nonstop-incoherence-on-isis">More</a>By <a href="/author/edward-morrissey" ><span class="byline">Edward Morrissey</span></a>Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:11:00 -0400This is what happens when Republicans actually enact their radical agendahttp://theweek.com/article/index/268182/this-is-what-happens-when-republicans-actually-enact-their-radical-agendahttp://theweek.com/article/index/268182/this-is-what-happens-when-republicans-actually-enact-their-radical-agenda<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62747_article_main/w/240/h/300/sam-brownbacknbspwonders-where-it-all-went-wrongnbsp.jpg?209" /></P><p>A persistent elite Washington trope, embodied by folks like Ron Fournier, says that bipartisanship is the key missing ingredient in our system of government. The two parties just need to stop their partisan bickering and join hands to hammer out serious, substantive compromises (read: slash social insurance).</p><p>It's certainly the case that because of U.S. constitutional design, compromise is necessary during times of divided government &mdash; and the ones who won't do it are ultraconservative Republicans. But there's another model of governance that gets short shrift among the lovers of bipartisanship...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268182/this-is-what-happens-when-republicans-actually-enact-their-radical-agenda">More</a>By <a href="/author/ryan-cooper" ><span class="byline">Ryan Cooper</span></a>Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:09:00 -0400