The Week: Most Recent U.S. Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/usMost recent posts.en-usWed, 01 Oct 2014 09:20:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent U.S. Posts from THE WEEKWed, 01 Oct 2014 09:20:00 -0400Did the Secret Service drop the ball in 2011?http://theweek.com/article/index/269070/did-the-secret-service-drop-the-ball-in-2011http://theweek.com/article/index/269070/did-the-secret-service-drop-the-ball-in-2011<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0126/63113_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-white-house-was-a-target.jpg?209" /></P><p>On November 11, 2011, Oscar Ortega-Hernandez opened the driver's side window of his S.U.V. and fired high-velocity rounds from a semi-automatic rifle at the White House as he drove past the complex on Constitution Avenue. This week, <em>The Washington Post</em> published an article suggesting that the Secret Service ignored contemporaneous reports that his bullets struck the executive mansion. At Tuesday's hearing, director Julia Pierson struggled to explain why it took agents four days to discover that, yes, the White House was Ortega-Hernandez's target.</p><p>An internal timeline of the Secret Service's response...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/269070/did-the-secret-service-drop-the-ball-in-2011">More</a>Marc AmbinderWed, 01 Oct 2014 09:20:00 -0400Why colleges' insistence on 'diversity' actually fails disadvantaged kidshttp://theweek.com/article/index/268894/why-colleges-insistence-on-diversity-actually-fails-disadvantaged-kidshttp://theweek.com/article/index/268894/why-colleges-insistence-on-diversity-actually-fails-disadvantaged-kids<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0126/63051_article_main/w/240/h/300/we-need-to-expand-how-students-make-it-into-universities.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Sometimes, vague can be misleading &mdash; and harmful. For years, colleges have identified disadvantaged students based primarily on "diversity" and "need." But those categories are broad and unspecific, and can be gamed by sophisticated applicants and parents.. The result? Schools aren't helping the students that really need it. And higher education is now perpetuating &mdash; rather than alleviating &mdash; inequality. We can reverse this pattern by learning from our education history and shifting the focus of that aid effort to first-generation college students.</p><p>The key here is this: colleges...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268894/why-colleges-insistence-on-diversity-actually-fails-disadvantaged-kids">More</a>By Tomiko Brown-NaginWed, 01 Oct 2014 08:59:00 -0400What is the Uniformed Division of the Secret Service, anyway?http://theweek.com/article/index/268993/what-is-the-uniformed-division-of-the-secret-service-anywayhttp://theweek.com/article/index/268993/what-is-the-uniformed-division-of-the-secret-service-anyway<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0126/63076_article_main/w/240/h/300/on-patrol.jpg?209" /></P><p>Why is the White House protected by an entity called the "Uniformed Division of the Secret Service?" The naming convention is important. It certifies that its officers are not regular Secret Service agents. Depending on what you associate with the word "uniformed," you might think they perform a service function somehow &mdash; but they don't.</p><p>They regularly interact with the public, something most special agents don't do.</p><p>Their history is also unique. What is now the U.D. has ping-ponged between the Secret Service and other law-enforcement entities in the Washington area for more than a century...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268993/what-is-the-uniformed-division-of-the-secret-service-anyway">More</a>Marc AmbinderTue, 30 Sep 2014 06:49:00 -0400Share your lunch, get detentionhttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/268763/share-your-lunch-get-detentionhttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/268763/share-your-lunch-get-detention<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62979_flipbook_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?209" /></P><p>A California eighth-grader was disciplined for offering to share his lunch with a friend. The friend didn't like his lunch, so Kyle Bradford offered him a piece of his chicken burrito. "I wasn't really hungry, so it was just going to go in the garbage," Kyle said. But school officials prohibit students from sharing lunches "because of safety and liability issues," so Kyle was sent to detention.</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/flipbook/268763/share-your-lunch-get-detention">More</a>By The Week StaffSun, 28 Sep 2014 16:00:00 -0400Media training for cops who might shoot suspectshttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/268762/media-training-for-cops-who-might-shoot-suspectshttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/268762/media-training-for-cops-who-might-shoot-suspects<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62978_flipbook_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1"><span class="s1">The St. Louis County police academy is offering officers a "fun" seminar on how to deal with the media after cops shoot suspects. The academy promises the "fast-paced class will be jam-packed with essential strategies" on "How to Win with the Media," covering such topics as "Don't Get Stuck on Stupid" and "Feeding the Animals."</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/flipbook/268762/media-training-for-cops-who-might-shoot-suspects">More</a>By The Week StaffSat, 27 Sep 2014 09:00:00 -0400What Narendra Modi's big American debut means for climate changehttp://theweek.com/article/index/268662/what-narendra-modis-big-american-debut-means-for-climate-changehttp://theweek.com/article/index/268662/what-narendra-modis-big-american-debut-means-for-climate-change<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62934_article_main/w/240/h/300/modis-visit-could-mark-a-turning-point.jpg?209" /></P><p class="normal">Next week, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi will make his first official visit to the United States since his election in May. Modi will spend two days in Washington, D.C., meeting with President Obama on a wide variety of issues &mdash; and for a refreshing change, climate change is likely to be at the top of the agenda.</p><p class="normal">The U.S.'s relations with India have suffered over the past year. The arrest of an Indian diplomat in New York City and trade-related disputes have been two high-profile tiffs, amid an overall sense that the relationship has drifted during the Obama administration. Indeed...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268662/what-narendra-modis-big-american-debut-means-for-climate-change">More</a>By <a href="/author/neil-bhatiya" ><span class="byline">Neil Bhatiya</span></a>Fri, 26 Sep 2014 06:08:00 -0400What drive-thru funerals say about death in Americahttp://theweek.com/article/index/268314/what-drive-thru-funerals-say-about-death-in-americahttp://theweek.com/article/index/268314/what-drive-thru-funerals-say-about-death-in-america<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62782_article_main/w/240/h/300/a-drive-up-funeral-home-in-louisiana-january-1977.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Much of what we know about the earliest human cultures comes not from the works of art they left behind on the walls of caves, or the fossilized fascinations around their campfires, but from their dead. Then, as now, humans struggled with death and mourned their dead through a prescribed series of rituals, believing that this was a fundamental part of the grieving process and that without these steps, their loved ones would not pass on to a greater world beyond. Today, the process of grieving has been greatly abbreviated, shortened, and turned almost into a parody of itself, and the digital realm...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268314/what-drive-thru-funerals-say-about-death-in-america">More</a>By S.E. SmithThu, 25 Sep 2014 15:30:00 -0400The fragile splendor of America's largest national foresthttp://theweek.com/article/index/267147/the-fragile-splendor-of-americas-largest-national-foresthttp://theweek.com/article/index/267147/the-fragile-splendor-of-americas-largest-national-forest<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62939_article_main/w/240/h/300/tongass-national-park.jpg?209" /></P><p>There is a land, in southeast Alaska, that feels like the setting of some old-world fairy tale. Across nearly 17 million acres, bears wander through icy rivers, pausing to snatch salmon from the watery depths before sauntering into lush rainforests. Eagles fly across windswept plains, battered down by seasonal storms. Blue and white glaciers scour the bedrock of otherwise imposing mountain ranges.</p><p>Photographer Mark Meyer ventured into this stunning Alaskan wild four times over the course of one summer to capture as many of the Tongass' wonders as he could for the U.S. Forest Service.</p><p>"Even though...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267147/the-fragile-splendor-of-americas-largest-national-forest">More</a>By <a href="/author/sarah-eberspacher" ><span class="byline">Sarah Eberspacher</span></a>Thu, 25 Sep 2014 12:01:00 -04007 questions for the Secret Service after the White House Security breachhttp://theweek.com/article/index/268668/7-questions-for-the-secret-service-after-the-white-house-security-breachhttp://theweek.com/article/index/268668/7-questions-for-the-secret-service-after-the-white-house-security-breach<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62937_article_main/w/240/h/300/why-wasnt-the-door-locked.jpg?209" /></P><p>When it comes to White House security, I'm an amateur. Though I've written quite a bit about the United States Secret Service, there's a lot I don't know about the complicated, multi-layered web of security procedures and protocols that compromise the White House Security Plan.</p><p>That said, you don't have to be an expert to know that the uproar over Friday's breach is understandable, and that the concern about Secret Service tactics is quite kosher. Some of the speculation about what <em>should have been done</em>, however, defies common sense. So let's roll through some of the questions &mdash; some good...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268668/7-questions-for-the-secret-service-after-the-white-house-security-breach">More</a>Marc AmbinderWed, 24 Sep 2014 09:05:00 -0400How the U.S. military's idiotic tribal mentality leaves us vulnerable to cyber catastrophehttp://theweek.com/article/index/268583/how-the-us-militarys-idiotic-tribal-mentality-leaves-us-vulnerable-to-cyber-catastrophehttp://theweek.com/article/index/268583/how-the-us-militarys-idiotic-tribal-mentality-leaves-us-vulnerable-to-cyber-catastrophe<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62898_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-government-needs-the-countrys-best-and-brightest-tech-minds-to-work-for-their-country.jpg?209" /></P><p>The future of cyber warfare is limited only by the imaginations of enterprising hackers. In this arena, there is a dangerously level geopolitical playing field and an ill-defined domestic "turf." In the void of the unfulfilled promise of Cybercom, we're left waiting for some U.S. agency to take the lead on cyber warfare. The U.S. military in particular has a chance to "own" cyber. But if reports this week are any indication, America's armed services are going to blow it, and badly.</p><p>Here's where we are today: If you want to find the smartest minds in technology, look anywhere but the government...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268583/how-the-us-militarys-idiotic-tribal-mentality-leaves-us-vulnerable-to-cyber-catastrophe">More</a>By <a href="/author/david-w-brown" ><span class="byline">David W. Brown</span></a>Wed, 24 Sep 2014 07:15:00 -0400