The Week: Most Recent U.S. Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/usMost recent posts.en-usFri, 01 Aug 2014 10:50:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent U.S. Posts from THE WEEKFri, 01 Aug 2014 10:50:00 -0400Hey, GOP: American exceptionalism demands compassion at the borderhttp://theweek.com/article/index/265689/hey-gop-american-exceptionalism-demands-compassion-at-the-borderhttp://theweek.com/article/index/265689/hey-gop-american-exceptionalism-demands-compassion-at-the-border<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0123/61586_article_main/w/240/h/300/have-a-heart.jpg?206" /></P><p>If a child showed up at your doorstep, begging for help, what would you do?</p><p>Most Americans, I suspect, would offer help, even if that meant simply calling the police, who would, hopefully, ascertain whether the child was really in danger. But a lot of Americans who would respond to such a scenario with compassion also believe that America should simply shut its door to desperate refugees.</p><p>I would suggest that a moral nation has an obligation to come to the aid of children who are fleeing grave danger. A nation as blessed as America ought to be a force for good in the world. "<em>For unto whomsoever...</em></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/265689/hey-gop-american-exceptionalism-demands-compassion-at-the-border">More</a>By <a href="/author/matt-k-lewis" ><span class="byline">Matt K. Lewis</span></a>Fri, 01 Aug 2014 10:50:00 -0400Today in history: President Truman establishes the Fulbright Scholarship Programhttp://theweek.com/article/index/247714/today-in-history-president-truman-establishes-the-fulbright-scholarship-programhttp://theweek.com/article/index/247714/today-in-history-president-truman-establishes-the-fulbright-scholarship-program<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0102/51109_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-fulbright-scholarship-program-was-named-after-its-creator-james-william-fulbright-a-democratic.jpg?206" /></P><p><br /></p><p><strong>August 1, 1946:</strong> President Truman signed the Fulbright Scholarship Program into law &mdash; named for Arkansas Sen. J. William Fulbright. Six decades later, the Fulbright Program is the most widely recognized and prestigious international exchange program in the world, supported each year by an annual appropriation from Congress and other nations. The Fulbright program works with universities, schools, government agencies, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and the private sector to assist individuals of high achievement and potential who represent the full diversity of their respective societies...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/247714/today-in-history-president-truman-establishes-the-fulbright-scholarship-program">More</a>By West Wing ReportsFri, 01 Aug 2014 09:38:00 -0400The conservative battle against ObamaCare won't end with Halbighttp://theweek.com/article/index/265657/the-conservative-battle-against-obamacare-wont-end-with-halbighttp://theweek.com/article/index/265657/the-conservative-battle-against-obamacare-wont-end-with-halbig<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0123/61580_article_main/w/240/h/300/obamas-affordable-care-act-contains-the-seeds-of-its-own-destruction.jpg?206" /></P><p>No matter how you feel about <em>Halbig vs. Sebelius</em> &mdash; the recent decision that said it was illegal for the government to funnel subsidies to the 36 states that declined to build health care exchanges &mdash; the odds that this legal challenge to ObamaCare will ultimately prevail in the courts are not that high. But the law's supporters should brace themselves for even fiercer future battles: Their folly was to pass a complicated and flawed law with zero Republican support, and now they have to contend with full-bore Republican opposition as they try to make it work.</p><p><em>Halbig</em>'s odds of being upheld...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/265657/the-conservative-battle-against-obamacare-wont-end-with-halbig">More</a>By <a href="/author/shikha-dalmia" ><span class="byline">Shikha Dalmia</span></a>Fri, 01 Aug 2014 06:14:00 -0400Today in history: America lost its 17th presidenthttp://theweek.com/article/index/247601/today-in-history-america-lost-its-17th-presidenthttp://theweek.com/article/index/247601/today-in-history-america-lost-its-17th-president<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0102/51067_article_main/w/240/h/300/rip.jpg?206" /></P><p><br /></p><p><strong>July 31, 1875:</strong> Andrew Johnson died. He was the 17th president, serving from 1865 to 1869. Johnson, who succeeded Abraham Lincoln after Lincoln's assassination, became the first president to be impeached. The House voted to do so on 11 counts of trying to illegally remove Secretary of War Edwin Stanton from office and for violating several post-war Reconstruction Acts. The House also accused the president of hurling libelous "inflammatory and scandalous harangues" against Congressional members.</p><div>In a dramatic Senate trial, Johnson was acquitted by just one vote. Bill Clinton is the only other...</div> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/247601/today-in-history-america-lost-its-17th-president">More</a>By West Wing ReportsThu, 31 Jul 2014 11:31:00 -0400How a drafting error could doom Obama's carbon regulationshttp://theweek.com/article/index/265444/how-a-drafting-error-could-doom-obamas-carbon-regulationshttp://theweek.com/article/index/265444/how-a-drafting-error-could-doom-obamas-carbon-regulations<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0123/61533_article_main/w/240/h/300/back-to-reality.jpg?206" /></P><p>On June 2nd, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency unveiled its "Clean Power Plan," a new proposed rule for power plants that could fundamentally alter America's energy landscape. The Plan, which would require a 30 percent reduction of carbon-dioxide emissions from electrical generation by 2030, has enormous implications for the course of the U.S. economy and electrical grid. If implemented, it could be one of the most important features of Obama's legacy as president.</p><p>To be implemented, though, the Clean Power Plan must first survive a court challenge. And that's a big problem for the administration...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/265444/how-a-drafting-error-could-doom-obamas-carbon-regulations">More</a>By Josiah NeeleyWed, 30 Jul 2014 11:04:00 -0400Today in history: "In God We Trust" becomes America's official mottohttp://theweek.com/article/index/247563/today-in-history-in-god-we-trust-becomes-americas-official-mottohttp://theweek.com/article/index/247563/today-in-history-in-god-we-trust-becomes-americas-official-motto<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0102/51032_article_main/w/240/h/300/in-god-we-trust-was-printed-on-the-united-states-paper-money-in-1957.jpg?206" /></P><p><br /></p><p><strong>July 30, 1863:</strong> As the Civil War raged, President Abraham Lincoln issued his "eye-for-an-eye" order. It was described in the September issue of <em>Harper's New Monthly Magazine</em> (p.559) as follows:</p><p >"The law of retaliation is formally announced by both the National and the Confederate authorities. Two Confederate officers were executed in Tennessee, June 9, by order of General Rosencrans, as spies found within our lines. The Confederates chose by lot, from among our prisoners at Richmond, two officers, and set them apart for execution, when ordered, in retaliation. Two officers of the enemy in our...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/247563/today-in-history-in-god-we-trust-becomes-americas-official-motto">More</a>By West Wing ReportsWed, 30 Jul 2014 09:14:00 -0400Sex can't explain the culture warhttp://theweek.com/article/index/265520/sex-cant-explain-the-culture-warhttp://theweek.com/article/index/265520/sex-cant-explain-the-culture-war<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0123/61517_article_main/w/240/h/300/it-doesnt-end-here.jpg?206" /></P><p>Earlier this week, my colleague Damon Linker wrote a thoughtful essay on the nature of the culture war, distilling it down to how attitudes about sex changed radically over a very short period of time. As Damon typically does, he stakes out his own position while giving fair treatment to reasonable and rational disagreement. He ends by suggesting that traditionalist views deserve respect &mdash; mainly because the implications of the sexual revolution are largely still unknown. But the framing of the question mirrors the disconnect between the traditionalists and the modernists in the culture war...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/265520/sex-cant-explain-the-culture-war">More</a>By <a href="/author/edward-morrissey" ><span class="byline">Edward Morrissey</span></a>Wed, 30 Jul 2014 06:10:00 -0400Today in history: America enters the space agehttp://theweek.com/article/index/247495/today-in-history-america-enters-the-space-agehttp://theweek.com/article/index/247495/today-in-history-america-enters-the-space-age<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0101/50991_article_main/w/240/h/300/russias-sputnik-inspired-president-eisenhower-to-create-nasa-in-1958.jpg?206" /></P><p><br /></p><p><strong>On This Day, 1958: </strong>Vowing that the United States would lead the space age, President Dwight Eisenhower signed an act creating the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, more commonly known as NASA. NASA was formed nine months after the Soviet Union beat the U.S. into space by launching the first satellite, Sputnik. Sputnik scared many Americans into thinking that the U.S. was falling behind foreign rivals; it spurred huge government investments in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Although the Soviets &mdash; in 1961 &mdash; beat the United States would, in 1969, become...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/247495/today-in-history-america-enters-the-space-age">More</a>By West Wing ReportsTue, 29 Jul 2014 09:11:00 -0400Why Texas' abortion rates aren't falling as quickly as everyone expectedhttp://theweek.com/article/index/265441/why-texas-abortion-rates-arent-falling-as-quickly-as-everyone-expectedhttp://theweek.com/article/index/265441/why-texas-abortion-rates-arent-falling-as-quickly-as-everyone-expected<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61477_article_main/w/240/h/300/an-impact-not-as-large-as-expected.jpg?206" /></P><p>In the months since Texas' controversial abortion restrictions began to go into effect, the state's health-care landscape has been transformed.</p><p>A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Texas's Policy Evaluation Project found that since state legislators passed HB2 &mdash; the raft of restrictions on abortion doctors and facilities made famous last summer by Wendy Davis' marathon filibuster &mdash; 19 of Texas's 41 abortion clinics have closed their doors. The closures are thanks to a provision of HB2 that requires abortion providers to receive admitting privileges at local hospitals...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/265441/why-texas-abortion-rates-arent-falling-as-quickly-as-everyone-expected">More</a>By Amelia Thomson-DeVeauxTue, 29 Jul 2014 06:11:00 -0400Today in history: 50,000 more troops are ordered to Vietnamhttp://theweek.com/article/index/265447/today-in-history-50000-more-troops-are-ordered-to-vietnamhttp://theweek.com/article/index/265447/today-in-history-50000-more-troops-are-ordered-to-vietnam<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61478_article_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?206" /></P><p><br /></p><p> </p><p><strong>July 28, 1814: </strong> As British troops moved up the Chesapeake Bay, an angry crowd gathered outside the President's House, warning James and Dolley Madison that they would be prevented from fleeing Washington if they attempted to do so. There had been rumors that Madison would flee as the War of 1812 progressed.</p><p><strong>July 28, 1932:</strong> President Herbert Hoover sent in the Army to evict protesting veterans who were camping on the National Mall in Washington. The veterans were demanding benefits that they had been promised. Hoover feared violence from the 17,000-man "Bonus Army." He told Douglas MacArthur...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/265447/today-in-history-50000-more-troops-are-ordered-to-vietnam">More</a>By West Wing ReportsMon, 28 Jul 2014 10:48:00 -0400