April 23, 2013

With climbing ticket prices, invasive security procedures, lengthy delays, and frustrating baggage fees, it's pretty easy to hate airlines. But every so often, they really do make us smile. Consider 7-year-old Cole Holzer, who was heartbroken to discover that he'd mistakenly left his deceased dad's T-shirt on a Delta Airlines flight. Ever since his dad passed away two years ago, Cole had carried the worn item around as a keepsake. When the cleaning crew got wind of the misplaced memento, they dug around in the trash until they found it, reuniting the boy with his beloved shirt. Lauren Hansen

3:57 p.m. ET

The Supreme Court on Friday announced that it will hear a high schooler's challenge that he be allowed to use the bathroom at school that corresponds to his gender identity, not his biological sex.

Gavin Grimm, a transgender male student at a Virginia high school, initially sued the Gloucester County school district over its policy "limiting restroom use to students' biological sex," BuzzFeed News reports, but lost at the district court level before the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals found in his favor. Grimm's case centers on whether the school district's policy violates Title IX protection, which has been the Obama administration's position as the issue has gained prominence this year.

Grimm's case will be the Supreme Court's first consideration of transgender bathroom rules. Kimberly Alters

3:57 p.m. ET

Following the FBI's announcement Friday that it would be further reviewing emails potentially related to the investigation of Hillary Clinton's private email server, Clinton's camp has responded by lashing out at FBI Director James Comey.

"It is extraordinary that we would see something like this just 11 days out from a presidential election," Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta said, claiming Comey "should immediately provide the American public more information than is contained in the letter." Podesta added that Comey already "declared no reasonable prosecutor would move forward with a case like this" when he recommended no criminal charges last summer, and that "Donald Trump and his Republican allies" in the intervening months "have been baselessly second-guessing the FBI."

The New York Times confirmed later Friday that the emails were discovered during the FBI's investigation into former New York congressman Anthony Weiner, the estranged husband of top Clinton aide Huma Abedin. Jeva Lange

3:33 p.m. ET
Andrew Burton/Getty Images

The FBI announced Friday that it would be renewing its investigation into Hillary Clinton's private email server after learning of "the existence of emails that appear to be pertinent to the investigation," as FBI Director James Comey wrote in a letter to Congress. Those new emails were apparently discovered in the FBI seizure of "electronic devices belonging to Huma Abedin and her husband, Anthony Weiner," The New York Times reports.

Abedin and Weiner separated earlier this year after renewed reports of Weiner sexting other women. "The FBI and the New York Police Department have opened preliminary investigations of allegations that the former New York Democratic congressman exchanged sexually explicit text messages with a purportedly underage girl," CNN reported in September.

In July, the FBI recommended no criminal charges after looking into if Clinton or her aides had mishandled classified information. Comey did, however, say at the time that Clinton was "extremely careless" with her private email server. Jeva Lange

3:03 p.m. ET

The Observer has obtained the contents of a 2006 audio tape that appears to reveal then-Sen. Hillary Clinton suggesting the U.S. should have rigged the Palestinian election. "I do not think we should have pushed for an election in the Palestinian territories. I think that was a big mistake," Clinton is heard telling the editorial board of The Jewish Press about the Jan. 25, 2006 election for the second Palestinian Legislative Council, in which Hamas won a victory over the U.S.-preferred Fatah. "And if we were going to push for an election," Clinton went on, "then we should have made sure that we did something to determine who was going to win."

The original tape belongs to Eli Chomsky, a former editor and staff writer for The Jewish Press, who claims to have the only copy in existence. Chomsky told The Observer, which is published by Donald Trump's son-in-law, that at the time he was surprised "anyone could support the idea — offered by a national political leader, no less — that the U.S. should be in the business of fixing foreign elections."

The news went unpublished at the time, Chomsky explained, because "The Jewish Press had this mindset that they would not want to say anything offensive about anybody … My bosses didn't think it was newsworthy at the time. I was convinced that it was and I held onto it all these years."

The tape is 45 minutes long, and contains "much that is no longer relevant," The Observer writes. You can listen below, or read more about it at The Observer. Jeva Lange

2:42 p.m. ET

After FBI Director James Comey announced that the bureau would be renewing its look into Hillary Clinton's private email server, liberals reacted with both shock and concern over an election that many had already been celebrating as a victory.

You might guess how the news has gone over with Donald Trump. Jeva Lange

2:22 p.m. ET

On Friday, the FBI announced it would be doing a further review of emails potentially related to the investigation of Hillary Clinton's private email server. Clinton was on a plane en route to Iowa when the news broke, which led to frenzied anticipation of the Democratic nominee's response to the news.

After spending almost half an hour still inside the plane when it finally did land, Clinton emerged at last — and was greeted by this:

And you thought landing at LaGuardia was bad. Kimberly Alters

1:58 p.m. ET

Russia has lost its seat on the United Nations Human Rights Council, having been ousted by a vote Friday among the 193 member countries of the United Nations. Russia had been a member of the UNHCR since its creation in 2006.

Membership to the 47-member council is appropriated geographically, and Russia was competing with Hungary and Croatia for two available seats allotted to Eastern Europe. In the elections Friday, Russia received only 112 votes, while Hungary and Croatia received 144 votes and 114, respectively. Russia has been widely criticized for human rights violations, particularly with its treatment of LGBT individuals and its support for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

Also Friday, Saudi Arabia — another nation with a spotty human rights record, as New York Times United Nations reporter Somini Sengupta notes — won one of the seats available for Asia. Egypt, Iraq, China, and the United States were also elected to the council. Kimberly Alters

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