For those who have everything
April 10, 2013

The Catchpole & Rye Crystal Bateau doesn't really do anything that a regular bathtub can't — other than adding some super-expensive sparkle to your bathroom. The 22,000 crystals that cover each $230,000 tub are stuck to the bathtub's surface by hand in a process that takes more than 200 hours. Behold, says Ami Angelowicz at The Frisky: The "most ostentatious way possible to relax and unwind after a long day." Samantha Rollins

2016 Watch
1:15 p.m. ET
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The head of the Clinton Foundation on Sunday acknowledged that the global charity "made mistakes" in how it disclosed and handled donations.

Responding to recent criticism of the foundation that threatened its reputation and Hilary Clinton's nascent presidential campaign, acting CEO Maura Pally said the foundation would commit to greater transparency and limit donations from foreign governments. Moreover, she acknowledged clerical errors in the organization's tax forms, but insisted the overall revenue figures were correct.

"So yes, we made mistakes, as many organizations of our size do, but we are acting quickly to remedy them, and have taken steps to ensure they don't happen in the future," Pally wrote in a statement posted to the foundation's website. Jon Terbush

Rock and Roll Ain't Noise Pollution
12:40 p.m. ET
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A New Jersey judge has ruled that a mother who brought her daughter to a concert by the pop artist Pink is not guilty of poor parenting, as NJ.com notes.

The mother's decision "did not subject the child to any unreasonable risk of harm, or compromise [her] health, safety or welfare," Superior Court Judge Lawrence R. Jones wrote. Rather, it was "self-evident that all which happened here is that a young girl went to her first rock concert with her mother and had a really great time."

The case arose as part of a custody dispute in which the girl's father alleged child abuse after his ex-wife exposed their daughter to Pink's "lyrical profanities" and "sexually suggestive themes and dance performances." Judge Jones rejected that claim, citing Elvis, the Beatles, and rock music's history of baffling and outraging parents.

The court takes further judicial notice that historically, rock music has often involved socially controversial lyrics and themes, as well as what some people have at various times considered to be suggestive songs and performances. It is a matter of common knowledge that back in the 1950's and 60's, when rock music (then more commonly called rock and roll), was still in its relative infancy, millions of teens and pre-teens embraced this then-new style of music as not only exciting, but groundbreaking.

Many parents, however, did not welcome rock music with similar open arms. Instead, there was a significant degree of parental and social resistance and pushback by members of prior generations. [PDF]

One can only wonder how the judge would have ruled had the case involved not a Pink concert, but rather the Gathering of the Juggalos. Jon Terbush

Watch this
11:55 a.m. ET
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Constrained by decorum, President Obama at times appears unable to express the full heft of his emotions when dealing with difficult situations. Enter Keegan-Michael Key who, when playing Obama's fictional "anger translator," Luther, on the comedy Key & Peele, serves as the mouthpiece to the president's true thoughts and emotions.

At the White House Correspondents' Dinner on Saturday, Obama brought Key out to play that very role. Yet as Obama turned to obstreperous climate change deniers, he soon overtook Key as the voice of rage, prompting the comedian to leap in and save Obama from going too far.

"Instead of doing something about it [climate change] we've got elected officials throwing snowballs in the Senate," Obama said, his voice rising. "It is crazy."

"What about our kids? What kind of stupid, shortsighted, irresponsible bull—" he continued before Key cut him off. —Jon Terbush

Quotables
11:38 a.m. ET
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Saturday Night Live's Cecily Strong spared no one in Washington with her routine at Saturday's White House Correspondents' Association Dinner, but her most poignant barbs focused on race relations in America.

"Your hair is so white now it can talk back to the police," Strong said of President Obama.

Earlier, Strong earned mostly hushed grumbling when she combined into one punchline recent police shootings of unarmed black men and reports of Secret Service incompetence. Calling for applause for Secret Service agents in attendance, Strong called them, "the only law enforcement agency that will get in trouble if a black man gets shot."

You can watch Strong's full routine below. —Jon Terbush

2016 Watch
11:04 a.m. ET
Scott Olson / Getty Images

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) on Saturday claimed Christians in America face persecution at the hands of intolerant liberals.

"Today's Democratic Party has decided there is no room for Christians," Cruz warned at Iowa's Faith and Freedom Coalition summit.

"There is a liberal fascism that is going after Christian believers," he added.

Counting Cruz, nine declared or potential Republican presidential candidates attended the event in hopes of wooing evangelical voters. Representing a range of experience and political positions, the presidential hopefuls all tailored their messages to fit the religious tenor of the evening. Jon Terbush

Bringing the lols
10:44 a.m. ET
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President Obama came to the annual White House Correspondents' Association dinner on Saturday with plenty of barbs about Washington lawmakers and the reporters who cover them.

Noting that host Cecily Strong plays a CNN anchor on Saturday Night Live, Obama quipped that it was "surprising because usually the only people impersonating journalists are journalists on CNN." And addressing Dick Cheney's recent media tour in which the former vice president lambasted Obama, the president said the feeling was mutual.

"He thinks I'm the worst president of his lifetime," Obama said, "which is interesting because I think Dick Cheney is the worst president of my lifetime." —Jon Terbush

Developing story
9:19 a.m. ET
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At least 2,263 people are dead and nearly 6,000 are injured after Saturday's catastrophic earthquake in Nepal, according to the country's Home Ministry.

A powerful 7.8 magnitude quake and a series of violent aftershocks — one an estimated 6.7 magnitude rumbling on Sunday — rocked the mountain nation, destroying historic buildings, buckling infrastructure, and leaving behind widespread devastation. Thousands of people squatted in the streets after the first seismic activity either because the quake leveled their homes or because it made them too afraid to go back indoors.

The earthquake also triggered a deadly avalanche on Mount Everest that killed at least 18 people while injuring or trapping dozens more.

"I ran away," climber Nick Talbot told The New York Times. "I thought, 'There is no chance I can get away.' I just had my socks on." Jon Terbush

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