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Arizona's immigration bill: Views from across the border
Commentators in Mexico and Canada have plenty to say about Arizona's tough new law. Somewhat surprisingly, it's not all bad
Arizona's tough new immigration law didn't go over well on the other side of the border.
Arizona's tough new immigration law didn't go over well on the other side of the border.
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rizona's new immigration law — which requires police to demand papers from suspected illegal immigrants — has provoked impassioned reactions from our neighbors Mexico and Canada. While some Canadian opinion-makers supported the action, Mexico's Foreign Ministry has warned its citizens to carry passports and visas on them at all times when visiting Arizona to avoid being "harassed." The country's National Action Party urged a total tourism boycott of Arizona, and it seems to be working: Aeromexico has suspended flights to Phoenix due to "significantly" reduced demand. Here's a sampling of what's being said across our borders:

Arizona is now officially the enemy: "We must declare war on Arizona," says Ricardo Rocha in Mexico's El Universal. Mexicans should boycott the state entirely: Don't buy its goods, don't travel there, and don't attend classes at its universities. Arizona's abusive law "resembles Nazi Germany, when Jews were terrified to take to the streets."
"Arizona: A la cárcel por prietos (Arizona: Jail for the dark-skinned)"

Finally, Mexico's paying attention: John Lillpop in the Canada Free Press defended the new law, writing: "Until now, the Mexican government has done next to nothing to discourage illegal crossings into America." Urging people to carry papers and obey local laws is a "historic" change of tune. Thanks to this bill, "the Mexican government appears to be acting responsibly" for once.
"SB 1070 already paying dividends in Arizona!"

Demanding papers from every Mexican is no solution: Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer insists she won't tolerate racial profiling, says Kelly McParland in Canada's National Post, but she's being naive. "Who do you think will be stopped by police demanding papers and proof of legal status? White folks? Blacks? Asians?"
"New Arizona law makes every Hispanic a suspect"

This is racism, pure and simple: Though American courts will reject this "racist" law, says Ernesto Camou Healy in El Imparcial, a newspaper in Hermosillo, Mexico, 160 miles south of the Arizona border, its Republican backers are just trying to woo anti-immigration voters. "I hope Arizonans affected by racial stereotyping register, vote, and throw this throng of fanatics out of power."
"Batarete"

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