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Is Floyd Landis lying about Lance Armstrong?
The disgraced cyclist finally admits to doping, and says seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong did it, too. Armstrong denies it — who should we believe?
Some say cyclist Floyd Landis lied about Lance Armstrong.
Some say cyclist Floyd Landis lied about Lance Armstrong.
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fter denying doping charges for years, disgraced cyclist Floyd Landis has sent e-mails to sports authorities admitting that he used performance-enhancing drugs for most of his career. Landis, who was stripped of his 2006 Tour de France title, felt compelled to add that other top American cyclists — including seven-time Tour winner Lance Armstrong — had cheated, too. However, Armstrong, who's long denied doping allegations and never tested positive, said Landis has no proof. "It’s just our word against [his]," Armstrong said, "and we like our word." Who's telling the truth? (Watch an AP report about the bikers' battle)

Floyd Landis has no credibility: Landis' track record is hardly encouraging, says Bob Cesca in The Huffington Post. First, he wrote a book "hilariously titled Positively False" to defend himself against doping allegations, and now he admits the whole thing was a big, fat lie. Yet he wants us to take his word over that of Lance Armstrong, one of "the classiest, most popular riders in the world today"? "Good luck with that, Floyd."
"Floyd Landis is positively lying"

Landis may be a rat, but that doesn't mean Armstrong is innocent: Floyd Landis "is a jerk," says Mike Freeman at CBS Sports. "He's desperate. He has nothing." But like Jose Canseco — the disgraced slugger whose similarly detailed doping confession helped explode baseball's steroid scandal — Landis "may also be telling the truth" about Armstrong. Some of his specifics, "such as the account of Armstrong storing blood in a Spanish refrigerator," are so particular it seems unlikely they've been completely fabricated.
"Sellout rat Landis could be cycling's Jose Canseco"

Landis is in trouble if he has no evidence: Armstrong is "extremely aggressive" about defending his name in court, says Randy Starkman in the Toronto Star, so Landis may be facing a massive lawsuit. And it looks like the sport's governing body won't be investigating Armstrong — the International Cycling Union chief Pat McQuaid has accused Landis of making up the charges to damage the sport out of spite — so Landis is on his own, if this goes to court.
"Wouldn't Landis face huge lawsuit if he's lying re Armstrong?"

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