RSS
Anti-incumbent fever: By the numbers
With anti-Washington sentiment percolating across the country, a historic number of challengers have thrown their hats in the ring. Here's a breakdown
 
"Anti-incumbent fever" could dramatically alter the political landscape.
"Anti-incumbent fever" could dramatically alter the political landscape.
Corbis

Need more proof of dissatisfaction with incumbents and the status quo in Washington? A record-breaking number of congressional challengers have entered this year's midterm election. With much of the anger coming from voters on the Right, "the field is heavily Republican, with almost twice as many GOP candidates as Democrats," reports the Associated Press. (Candidacy registration still open in many states, so the numbers could rise even higher.) Some key stats on this increasingly bloated contest:

471
Total number of congressional seats up for grabs in November

2,341
Number of people who've filed statements of candidacy with the Federal Election Commission so far this year

2,159
Number of candidates in the 1992 election — the next largest field, historically — when Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush and Ross Perot battled for the White House

1,717
Number of candidates in the 2008 election

1,588
Number of candidates in the 2006 midterms election

$5,000
Minimum amount a candidate must raise or spend on his/her campaign before the FEC requires official registration

1975
Year the FEC began tracking congressional candidates

14
Number of Republican women running for the Senate this year, a record-high

3
Number of Republican women who ran for the Senate in 2008

94
Number of Republican women running for the House of Representatives this year (up from 46 in 2008)

40

Number of seats Republicans must win to regain control of the House of Representatives

10
Number of seats the GOP must collect to take back control of the Senate

22
Percentage of voters who say they are "angry" about how things are going in Washington, according to a recent CBS poll

36 percent
Approval rating of congressional Republicans, according to the latest USA Today/Gallup poll

43 percent
Approval rating for Democrats

49
Percentage of voters who prefer Republican candidates, compared to 43 percent for Democrats, according to a recent Gallup poll

 

THE WEEK'S AUDIOPHILE PODCASTS: LISTEN SMARTER

Subscribe to the Week