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Steven Slater, reality star?
America's favorite disgruntled former flight attendant could soon star in his own TV show. Predictably, the internet is amused
The proposed reality show would feature Slater helping "disgruntled workers" quit their jobs.
The proposed reality show would feature Slater helping "disgruntled workers" quit their jobs.
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ust a week after quitting — in dramatic fashion — his job as a JetBlue flight attendant, Steven Slater has reportedly been offered his own reality television show. Conceived by "powerhouse" production company Stone Entertainment, the program would feature Slater helping "disgruntled workers" resign from their jobs in "extravagant ways," reports TMZ. The caveat: If new information comes to light showing that Slater misrepresented the details of his sudden departure, the deal is off. Does Slater deserve to prolong his 15 minutes? The blogosphere reacts:

Finally! "File this story under 'What Took Them So Long?'" quips Rich Keller in TV Squad.

Copycats: Fantastic idea, says blogger Wild Double in 2Snaps.tv. But I "already pitched" this idea last week. "So I expect a producer credit and royalty check," thank you very much.

Perfect fit: Obviously, Slater knows how to "make a scene," says Effie Orfanides in Gather. So "making scenes for television show" should fit with his "outrageous persona" nicely.

Great, but can he write? With all the "excitement" surrounding Slater, says Eileen Reynolds in the New Yorker, "we can’t help but wonder if there’s a book deal" in his future, too.

Don't count on it: I'm not so sure this show will "work out," says Juli Weiner in Vanity Fair. After all, "Steven Slater has not proven himself to be the most professional employee."

One hot minute: This Slater deal shows nothing's impossible, says David Hinckley in the New York Daily News. "[But] if this project gets green-lighted, they'd better shoot with high-speed film, because this dude's hot moment is cooling off faster than Tiger Woods' marriage."

Bad timing: This show won't "fly," says Jane Wells in CNBC. If you "haven't noticed, people need jobs right now." They don't need Slater to help them "ditch a steady paycheck."

Consider the competition: This certainly sounds like a terrible idea, says Yvonne Villarreal in the L.A.Times. But if a show like "Cheaters" can "stay in the game for 10 seasons," then "there must be a method to the reality madness, right?"

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