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What will Sarah Palin's next move be?
The former Republican vice presidential candidate has a wide array of political options. Where does she go from here?
 
There is plenty of speculation as to whether Sarah Palin will run for president in 2012.
There is plenty of speculation as to whether Sarah Palin will run for president in 2012.
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Former GOP vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin recently announced that on Sept. 17 she will make her first political speech in Iowa since the 2008 election campaign, fueling yet more speculation about her political future. But while her grassroots support remains strong, polls suggest most Americans still don't see her as presidential material. Given these mixed realities, what should Palin's next move be? (Watch a McCain adviser say it's time to forget Palin)

Run, Sarah, Run: Sarah Palin has "an incredibly committed band of loyal supporters from coast to coast," says Niall O'Dowd at Irish Central. At a time when Americans are "dangerously" angry at politicians, conservative voters remain wildly enthusiastic about Palin. This could be just the shot in the arm the GOP needs.
"Why Sarah Palin could be president"

She should be queen of the Tea Party: Palin's current status as a political celebrity will make it difficult for her to run for office, says Garance Franke-Ruta at Who Runs Gov. But it does allow her to present herself as "the Lady Liberty at the front of the Tea Party mass." Palin's ideal role is as the de facto spokesperson for the conservative movement.
"Palin’s path forward: A party leader?"

She ought to head the RNC: If Palin wants to return to politics, she should become chair of the Republican National Committee, says Cameron Lynch in U.S. News & World Report. To capitalize on what should be a banner midterm election year for the GOP, the party needs to come together. As RNC chair, Palin could help bridge the "growing chasm between Tea Partiers and traditional Republicans."
"Sarah Palin for RNC chair"

She's better off keeping her options open: As a political entity, Palin "faces large hurdles," says Gabriel Sherman at New York, but she continues to flourish as a media star. It's worth noting that "her flirtation with presidential politics is a big part of her appeal in the national media." As long as Palin carries on keeping pundits guessing, her "prominence on the national stage is assured."
"The case for why Sarah Palin won't run for president"

 

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