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A lesson in internet geography
A map of the online world offers an intriguing picture of what sites we visit and what we do there
 

The image: Artist Randall Munroe has created a "Map of Online Communities" that represents various social media sites as islands and continents with their size dependent on the amount of interaction — "talking, playing, sharing" — that goes on within the community. (See map below.) The map is dominated by Facebook, a sprawing empire akin to Rome at its height, while YouTube appears as a large island with "viral shores."
The response: "Seriously, Facebook is taking up a lot of space," remarks Technabob. Yes, but Munroe's 2007 version of this map was dominated by MySpace, says J.J. Sutherland at NPR, proving that online "empires rise and empires fall." Exactly, writes Veer at DesignTaxi. "It's only been three years [since the first version of the map] but already the way we communicate online has changed with such gravity that the internet back then seems quaint and unrecognizable even."


 

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