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Should Congress investigate the radicalization of American Muslims?
A leading House Republican, Peter King, wants to determine whether there's a rising number of terrorist sympathizers in our midst
Rep. Peter King (R-NY), who's instigating the proposed hearings, says he has been called a bigot.
Rep. Peter King (R-NY), who's instigating the proposed hearings, says he has been called a bigot.
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ep. Peter King (R-NY) is vowing to hold congressional hearings to investigate the "radicalization of the American Muslim community." His rationale: America will be safer if Congress can figure out why al Qaeda increasingly seeks recruits among Muslims living legally in the U.S. But Muslim leaders said such an inquiry would only stir up Islamophobia and hatred. Should Congress follow King's lead? (Watch King make his case)

What blatant bigotry: "King's wanton charges... [are] bunk," says Tanya Somanader in Think Progress. He claims U.S. imams are coddling the potential terrorists in their midst, but the truth is that "American Muslims have been vigilant in confronting radical elements," with youth programs, anti-violence seminars, and other forms of outreach. King says his detractors are spouting politically correct "nonsense," but he's the one ignoring the truth.
"Peter King: 'I'm willing to' be called a bigot if that's what it takes to target Muslim community"

The threat of homegrown terrorism exists: The angry left is trying to sweep a genuine national security issue under the rug with their "hackneyed racial rigmarole," says K.E. Campbell in The American Thinker. Islamic radicals are out there in America, committed to attacking this country. And King isn't the only one who realizes this — police departments in New York, Los Angeles, and other places have discussed the threat. "The problem is real and the hearings are necessary, important, and timely."
"The radicalization of American Muslims"

King must strike the right balance: Fifteen percent of Muslim Americans between ages 18 and 29 say suicide bombing is justified, says Spencer Ackerman in Firedoglake, according to a Pew Poll cited by King. "That's a really alarming percentage." But King should ask himself whether his approach will help "marginalize and deal with the troublesome 15 percent," or simply "inflame" everybody. It's fine for King to "ask uncomfortable questions" about radicalization in America as long as he allows an honest and open debate.
"Playing the (alarming) percentages"

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