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How many NASA scientists does it take to form a 'human space shuttle'?
Thousands of employees pose for a unique photo honoring the end of the space shuttle program
 
More than 2,000 NASA employees gathered in an empty parking to pay tribute to the 30-year-old space shuttle program by forming a "human space shuttle."
More than 2,000 NASA employees gathered in an empty parking to pay tribute to the 30-year-old space shuttle program by forming a "human space shuttle."
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The video: Thousands of NASA Kennedy Space Center employees gathered in an empty parking lot last week to honor the end of the 30-year space shuttle program by assembling themselves into the shape of a "human space shuttle." (See a video of the photo opportunity, below.) More than 2,000 scientists, engineers, and administrative staff, all of whom worked on the shuttle program, participated. The space shuttle program will wind down later this year, when the Atlantis shuttle launches into orbit in June. Thereafter, NASA will focus on sending a human expedition to an asteroid by 2025.
The reaction: Unlike the vast majority of shuttle expeditions, this mission didn't quite go as planned, says the Daily Mail. Too many people turned up to form a shuttle — the extra workers had to form a "slightly wonky" circle around the craft. Glitches aside, it's a fitting memorial for the three retiring space shuttles, says David Murphy at PC Magazine. But we haven't seen the last of them yet. "They'll live out the rest of their days in museums across the country." Watch a time-lapse video of the "human shuttle" here:

 

 

 

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