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The hot new computer: The Commodore 64?
The beloved, bulky, beige machine from the early 80s is back... with modern specs and the price tag to match
 
The homely but iconic Commodore 64 is back with updated, re-engineered functionality, but with a price-tag up to $900, some dismiss it as an over-hyped gimmick.
The homely but iconic Commodore 64 is back with updated, re-engineered functionality, but with a price-tag up to $900, some dismiss it as an over-hyped gimmick.
Facebook/ Commodor

The image: With a "whopping 64 kilobytes of memory" and revolutionary-for-its-day graphic and sound cards, all housed within a stylish mud-brown keyboard, the Commodore 64 is among the most popular home computers ever made. Released in 1982, it sold more than two million units a year for nearly a decade before its maker, Commodore International, went bankrupt in 1994, outshone by players like Apple and I.B.M. Now, the 64 is looking to make a comeback. The charmingly retro new Commodore 64 may look the same, but its modern innards have built-in ethernet and a Blu-ray player (included in the "ultimate edition"). "We believe there is a huge potential to revive the early format," says new Commodore chief Barry Altman, who purchased the trademark last September.
The reaction:
It's like "Geek Christmas," says Jordan Yerman at NowPublic. The awesome new Commodore 64 is "still rocking the beige plastic and iconic clickety-click key sound" from its original days. Not so awesome, says Charlie Sorrel at Wired. The cheapest working model of this "cute gimmick" costs $600, while the "ultimate edition" is $900. "If you think that's expensive, you're dead right. Add on the price of an expensive dinner for two and you could buy a MacBook Air."

 

 

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