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Jesse Ventura's 6 favorite books about conspiracies
The ex-wrestler who once governed Minnesota has a soft spot for books that claim to uncover hidden truths
Jesse Ventura, the wrestler who became a politician who then became a TV host, loves books that shed light on complex conspiracies.
Jesse Ventura, the wrestler who became a politician who then became a TV host, loves books that shed light on complex conspiracies.
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FK and the Unspeakable by James W. Douglass (Touchstone, $17). The best recent book about the murder of John F. Kennedy, which connects a great many dots we didn’t know about — including the fact that JFK and Nikita Khrushchev were communicating via back channels, including through Pope John XXIII, about ending the Cold War within five years.

Me & Lee by Judyth Vary Baker (Trine Day, $25). It was stunning to learn that Lee Harvey Oswald had a mistress. Her book shows beyond any doubt that he was clearly a government agent — because when Oswald was away on a mission in early 1963, Baker punched his time card at work every day!

The Secret Team by L. Fletcher Prouty (Skyhorse, $17). This book is tremendous because Col. Prouty, who worked for special operations forces under JFK’s Joint Chiefs of Staff, reveals who really runs our government. These are the high-level bureaucrats who remain while administrations come and go, and run amok without our elected officials knowing what’s happening.

The New Pearl Harbor Revisited by David Ray Griffin (Olive Branch, $20). A phenom­­­enal, scholarly book that debunks the official story about 9/11 with a whole lot of facts that haven’t been brought out into the public domain. That includes how the Twin Towers were brought down by a controlled demolition, and much documentation that the mainstream media won’t touch.

Helter Skelter by Vincent Bugliosi (Norton, $15). This story of Charles Manson and the Manson Family murders is the most widely read true-crime book in history. I’ve read it seven times, and something new always pops out. If I get bored, I can always pick up Helter Skelter. It’ll suck you in like a vacuum cleaner.

Life by Keith Richards (Little Brown, $30). Okay, this one has nothing to do with conspiracies, but it’s one of my favorite reads of late. I’ve been listening to the Rolling Stones since I was a young teenager, and in Keith’s autobiography, his great sense of humor comes across. He’s a true rock ’n’ roll survivor.

Jesse Ventura's new book, 63 Documents the Government Doesn't Want You to Read, is a follow-up to his 2010 best seller, American Conspiracies

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