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Will money trouble sink Newt Gingrich's campaign?
The former House speaker is already running on financial fumes — and now his super PAC patron is reportedly cutting him off
 
A super PAC aligned with Newt Gingrich has reaped $11 million from Sheldon Adelson's family, but now, the wealthy casino mogul is reportedly cutting Newt off.
A super PAC aligned with Newt Gingrich has reaped $11 million from Sheldon Adelson's family, but now, the wealthy casino mogul is reportedly cutting Newt off.
David Becker/Getty Images

The bad news keeps coming for Newt Gingrich. Since his win in South Carolina's primary last month, the former House speaker has been trounced in five states. His campaign, which was down to its last $600,000 before Florida's Jan. 31 vote, has found it increasingly hard to raise cash in the wake of Mitt Romney's landslide win there. And now comes what could be the worst news of all: Billionaire casino mogul Sheldon Adelson, whose family has donated $11 million to the pro-Gingrich Winning Our Future super PAC, has decided to stop sending checks, according to Bloomberg. Will this make it impossible for Gingrich to mount a comeback?

Newt is finished: Sheldon Adelson "rescued Newt Gingrich's campaign in its early days," says Jaywon Choe at Business Insider. Now "he may have just buried it." With Gingrich performing poorly in state after state, Adelson has reportedly met with Mitt Romney, a clear sign he's exploring other options. Even "more alarming" for Newt is that "as money seems to be flooding out" of his camp, it appears to be flowing into his conservative rival Rick Santorum's campaign and super PAC.
"Billionaire Gingrich contributor to cut support"

Gingrich's conservative fire can save him: Gingrich can still "revive his campaign," says Tony Lee at Human Events, by reminding conservatives of the bold ideas that once pushed him to the top of the polls — an optional 15 percent flat tax, curbing the influence of liberal activist judges, and eliminating the capital gains tax. Don't count Newt out yet.
"Gingrich will try to reset campaign at CPAC"

Newt's odds of a resurgence are getting worse: Gingrich's challenge after Florida "was to stay relevant until Super Tuesday" on March 6, says Justin Sink at The Hill. That means "raising money and solidifying his position as the conservative alternative to Mitt Romney." Obviously, Santorum's wins in Colorado, Minnesota, and Missouri made it tougher for Newt to claim he's the Right's best bet. And without Adelson's money, he can't "match Romney in advertising." Newt will likely wind up "limping into the Super Tuesday contests."
"Report: Adelson done giving to Gingrich as funding dries up"

 

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