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How teens are killing the phone call: By the numbers
OMG! Teens are sending more text messages than ever before, and exercising their vocal chords far less than kids did just a few short years ago
Teens don't talk, they text, sending and receiving an average of 60 messages per day, according to a new study.
Teens don't talk, they text, sending and receiving an average of 60 messages per day, according to a new study.
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oughly one-fourth of American teens own a smartphone — but they're not using them to place calls. A new survey from Pew Internet Research finds that texting is far and away the preferred medium of communication among teenagers. "Perhaps in the not-too-distant future, teens will be flummoxed when it comes to how to make a phone call," says Suzanne Choney at MSNBC. Here, a closer look at the demise of talk time, by the numbers:

5
Phone calls a typical teen makes each day

14
Percentage of teens who use a landline every day to speak with friends

30
Percentage of teens who used a landline every day to speak with friends in 2009

31
Percentage of teens who never use a landline, or live in a home without one

77
Percentage of teens who own a cell phone

23
Percentage of teens who own a smartphone

75
Percentage of cell-phone-owning teens who send texts regularly

51
Percentage of cell-phone-owning teens who sent texts regularly in 2006

60
Text messages a typical teen sends or receives each day, up from 50 in 2009. "Any parent who has watched their teenager's fingers flying through text messages with the speed of a hummingbird's wings" knows that teens are sending more texts than ever before, says Benny Evangelista at the San Francisco Chronicle.

100
Texts sent each day by girls ages 14 to 17, the study's "most enthusiastic texters"

50
Texts sent each day by boys that age

35
Percentage of teens who see their friends face-to-face (presumably outside of school) on a daily basis

22
Percentage of teens who speak with their friends using instant messaging on a daily basis

6
Percentage of teens who use email to contact their friends, which, says Evangelista, is "so 2005" 

Sources: Associated Press, MSNBCPew Internet ResearchSan Francisco Chronicle

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