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Does the new iPad really overheat?
According to some disgruntled tablet owners, Apple's newest gadget can reach uncomfortably high temperatures. Chill out, say critics
 
Ouch? The new iPad can get as hot as 116 degrees, 12 degrees hotter than the iPad 2, but far cooler than many conventional desktop computers.
Ouch? The new iPad can get as hot as 116 degrees, 12 degrees hotter than the iPad 2, but far cooler than many conventional desktop computers.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The new iPad can get "significantly hotter" than earlier models, says Donna L. Tapellini at Consumer Reports. How much hotter? The device's surface can reach 116 degrees Fahrenheit when the iPad is plugged in and running graphics-intensive games, a 12-degree jump from the iPad 2. "When it was at its hottest, it felt very warm, but not especially uncomfortable if held for a brief period," says Tapellini. Does Apple have the next "AntennaGate" on its hands — or is this much ado about nothing?

This is no big deal: "Frankly, this increase in temperature is absolutely to be expected," says Matthew Panzarino at The Next Web. The latest iPad has twice as much computing power as the iPad 2. And it's worth noting that "regular" computers can get as hot as 160 degrees. If anything, the fact that the new iPad peaks at only 116 degrees when plugged in and pushed to its limits is truly a "remarkable feat of engineering and fine tuning."
"Apple's new iPad runs no hotter than lukewarm tea, despite doubling graphics power"

But you can see why people are worried: The iPad can get a little hot to the touch, says Jared Newman at TIME. After an hour of game-playing, my tablet was uncomfortably warm on one side, but the problem wasn't so glaring that I'd switch to a competitor's product. And, of course, some consumers are just inclined to find fault. The original iPad, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, and iPhone 4S all provoked similar heat complaints. "Either Apple has a longstanding problem with overheating products, or people always find some way to complain."
"Heat test: New iPad is hotter to handle by 10 degrees"

Consumer Reports just compromised its credibility: The once-esteemed review publication is misleading its readers, says MG Siegler at TechCrunch. Sure, "116 degrees sounds hot. Really hot. Death Valley hot. It sounds like the thing is a grill." But the new iPad is "warm. Not hot." The editors at Consumer Reports should be ashamed for propagating such "ridiculousness."
"Consumer Reports recommends new iPad as your next home grill"

 

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