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'Strip for Likes': Has Facebook advertising gone too far?
A racy online campaign for sportswear brand Stussy promises that a model will peel off more and more clothing as she receives Facebook "Likes"
 
A model for sportswear brand Stussy wears an absurd amount of the fashion line's clothing, which she peels off layer-by-layer with every Facebook "Like."
A model for sportswear brand Stussy wears an absurd amount of the fashion line's clothing, which she peels off layer-by-layer with every Facebook "Like."
Facebook/Stussy Strip for Likes

"Like to see less, and share to undress." With this tantalizing appeal to Facebook users, fashion brand Stussy hopes to build buzz for its racy new online ad campaign, "Strip for Likes," which debuted with a female model dressed in umpteen layers of Stussy clothes. The more "Likes" the ad has received on Facebook, the more layers the model has taken off. (Watch a video demo below.) Recently, several companies have gotten into hot water while pushing the envelope to achieve viral advertising success. (See Belvedere's controversial "rape ad," for example.) Will Stussy's saucy campaign ultimately build awareness — or will its raciness backfire?

It's a terrible idea: Given that Stussy sells both men's and women's clothes, this campaign seems incredibly ineffective from a brand positioning standpoint, says Patricio Robles at Econsultancy. It only appeals to half of Stussy's target demographic, completely alienating women — some of whom "would be offended." At the very least, the company should introduce a corresponding campaign featuring a male model. But it's not even working particularly well: Despite the ad's near-instant notoriety, the company's official Facebook page only received a few hundred additional Facebook Likes — hardly impressive.
"Stussy: Will Strip for Likes on Facebook"

It's not particularly innovative: Loads of other fashion brands have experimented with Like walls, inviting consumers to "like this page if you want to see photos of our new collection," for example, says Amy Odell at Buzzfeed. As for the promised nudity that supposedly fuels this campaign? Anyone's who flipped through the pages of V or French Vogue, or clicked on Models.com or photographer Terry Richardson's website know that "naked models are everywhere." Those publications at least boast "artistic value and design merit." Stussy's campaign is just plain desperate.
"The real marketing problem with Stussy's 'Will Strip for Likes' campaign"

Actually, it's genius: After so much griping over ad campaigns "that are begging for Likes," Stussy is finally using the Facebook feature in an original way, says Amsterdam Ad Blog. Better yet, it hooks consumers. After liking the stripper once, users will come back multiple times to check on her stage of undress. In doing so, they'll see a multitude of Stussy clothes. "She thus becomes a catwalk stripper." It's a campaign that is "nice, simple, and effective."
"Stussy strips for Likes"
 

 

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