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U.K., Sweden protest Assange's asylum
 
Being on house arrest hasn't stopped WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange from starting a talk show, bringing newsy guests to his British estate via Skype.
Being on house arrest hasn't stopped WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange from starting a talk show, bringing newsy guests to his British estate via Skype.
Screen shot, worldtomorrow.wikileaks.org

The British and Swedish governments criticized Ecuador for granting political asylum to Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks. British Foreign Secretary William Hague said the U.K. is still under a "binding obligation" to send Assange, who's holed up in Ecuador's embassy in London, to Sweden to face sexual assault allegations, and that the case has nothing to do with his website's release of secret U.S. documents. Sweden's foreign ministry said it is "unacceptable that Ecuador would want to halt the Swedish judicial process." Britain says it won't let Assange leave; Ecuador's foreign minister, Ricardo Patino, says he hopes talks will "overcome this."

 

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