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10 things you need to know today: September 3, 2012
A deadly attack rattles Pakistan, Louisianans struggle in Isaac's wake, and more in our roundup of the stories that are making news and driving opinion
In Plaquemines Parish, La., birds fly on Sept. 2 above flooding caused by Hurricane Isaac: Hundreds of thousands of Pelican State residents are still without power.
In Plaquemines Parish, La., birds fly on Sept. 2 above flooding caused by Hurricane Isaac: Hundreds of thousands of Pelican State residents are still without power.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

1. U.S. CONSULATE CAR ATTACKED IN PAKISTAN
At least four U.S. consulate workers are seriously wounded and five other people are dead after a suicide bomber brazenly rammed a vehicle into a U.S. government car in Peshawar, Pakistan. Two of the wounded consulate workers are American, and the other two are Pakistani. No one has taken responsibility for Monday's attack, which took place near the Afghan border in an area of the city that is home to several foreign organizations, including the United Nations. The names of the injured and dead have not been released. [NBC News]
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2. FLOODING, POWER OUTAGES PERSIST AFTER ISAAC
Five days after Hurricane Isaac began pummeling Louisiana, more than 200,000 people across the state are still without power, while thousands of evacuees are still residing at shelters or with friends and family. And Louisiana authorities warn that the West Pearl River could crest at five feet past the flood point — to 19.5 feet — by evening.  "It's going to be a long couple of days," said one local official. [Times-Picayune]
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3. UNIFICATION CHURCH'S SUN MYUNG MOON DIES
Reverend Sun Myung Moon, the founder of the controversial but popular Unification Church, died Monday from complications of pneumonia in South Korea. Moon, 92, had been very active until recently, officiating a mass wedding for 2,500 in the spring and leading a church service with more than 15,000 parishioners in July. Critics have long attacked the church as a fringe organization, and questioned its finances. Today, Moon's church has 3 million followers, including 100,000 in the U.S. The church has a number of holdings, including the Washington Times newspaper and the iconic New Yorker Hotel.  [Associated Press]
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4. HUNDREDS PROTEST IN CHARLOTTE AHEAD OF DNC
About 800 protesters marched through Charlotte's business district on Sunday, just two days before the start of the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday. Many were protesting against corporate America and big money's influence in politics. "Banks got bailed out. We got sold out," read several signs. The two-hour protest in 92-degree heat was mostly civil. Still, two people were arrested, one for having a concealed knife and another for disorderly conduct. [UPI]
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5. COMPANIES BRACE FOR POSSIBLE GREEK EURO EXIT
Several U.S. companies are bracing for the worst in the event that debt-stricken Greece is forced to abandon the euro. Bank of America Merrill Lynch has reportedly looked into stuffing vehicles with cash to be sent over the Greek border so ensure their clients can still be paid if money becomes unavailable. Ford has rejiggered its computer systems in the event of a new Greek currency. And JP Morgan Chase has created new accounts for mega-companies. The contingency plans come as the small European country tries to avoid defaulting on its debt. [New York Times]
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6. FRANCE WARNS OF SYRIAN CHEMICAL ATTACK
French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said western powers are coming up with a game plan in the event that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's regime uses chemical or biological weapons in its civil war. "We are discussing this notably with our American and English partners," he said in a radio interview on Monday, adding that if Syria deploys such weapons "our response...would be massive and blistering." President Obama recently called it a "red line" for the U.S. if Assad uses chemical or biological weapons. Activist groups, meanwhile, said Sunday that a jaw-dropping 5,000 people were killed in Syria's civil war in August alone. [Associated Press]  
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7.  MARIOTT THANKS MITT FOR SPOTLIGHTING MORMONS
The head of the hotel chain conglomerate Marriott sang Mitt Romney's praises during a Mormon church service, saying the Republican had changed changing Americans' perceptions about the religion. J.W. Marriott Junior, a Mormon, spoke at a Wolfeboro, N.H., branch  of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day-Saints, where the Republican presidential nominee and his wife were attending services. Marriott thanked the couple for lifting the church "out of obscurity," adding that "there has never been as much positive attention...thanks to the wonderful campaign of Mitt Romney and his family." [CNN
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8. 13 COPS INJURED IN N. IRELAND
At least 13 police officers were wounded in clashes between Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland. A fight broke out over the rights of the two rival communities to hold parades in north Belfast. It started when a Catholic Irish nationalist band marched through an area where pro-British Protestants had already been banned from marching. Police fired water cannons at rioters while both sides threw bottles and stones at the officers. Since a peace agreement was signed 14 years ago, violence between the two groups, which has been going on and off for three decades, has largely subsided. [Reuters
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9. RODDICK ADVANCES, PROLONGS CAREER
Andy Roddick, the U.S. tennis star, postponed his retirement on Sunday when he beat Fabio Fognini of Italy in the U.S. Open. Now Roddick, the last American man to win a Grand Slam title, in 2003, will face fellow U.S. Open champ Juan Martin del Potro of Argentina. The 30-year-old shocked his fans when he announced last week that this tournament would be his last. [ESPN]
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10. COAST GUARD RESCUES RUSSELL CROWE
Actor Russell Crowe and his buddy were rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard after the duo got lost while kayaking just off of Long Island. The Coast Guard personnel were on routine patrol in Cold Spring Harbor on Saturday night when one of the two men called for help. Crowe and his friend hitched a ride back with the Coast Guard to Huntington Bay, nearly 10 miles away. On Twitter, the Oscar-winning actor thanked "the boys from the U.S. Coast Guard for guiding the way." The  short-tempered Aussie also insisted: "Not lost, we knew where exactly where we were...we ran out of day." [CNN]

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