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Officials rebuked for Fast and Furious
 
The (unlikely) worst-case scenario for Attorney General Eric Holder would see the House going for a criminal contempt charge, which could lead to a $1,000 penalty and up to one year in prison.
The (unlikely) worst-case scenario for Attorney General Eric Holder would see the House going for a criminal contempt charge, which could lead to a $1,000 penalty and up to one year in prison.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Justice Department's inspector general on Wednesday called for disciplinary reviews of 14 government officials over a botched gun-running operation known as Fast and Furious. The operation involved allowing drug cartels to smuggle guns into Mexico, in the hopes that the weapons could be tracked to gang leaders. However, U.S. officials lost track of the guns, two of which were eventually used in the killing of a U.S. border agent in 2011. The inspector general, Michael Horowitz, laid the blame on an Arizona-based group of agents with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives. Republicans in the House have held numerous hearings over the Fast and Furious operation, over suspicions that high-level members of the Obama administration, including Attorney General Eric Holder (pictured), had approved the operation in order to spur gun violence, which would then give the government the excuse it needed to pass tough gun control laws. Democrats say the charges are absurd.

 

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