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Scotland to vote on independence
 
British Prime Minister David Cameron cut Malawi's foreign aid by $30 million after the African nation sentenced a gay couple to 14 months of hard labor for holding an engagement party.
British Prime Minister David Cameron cut Malawi's foreign aid by $30 million after the African nation sentenced a gay couple to 14 months of hard labor for holding an engagement party.
Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

On Monday, Britain and Scotland signed a landmark agreement that will allow Scotland to hold a vote for independence by 2014. Scotland's independence movement has gathered momentum since the Scottish National Party won regional elections in 2011, but many oppose sundering Scotland's three-century membership in the United Kingdom, including Prime Minister David Cameron (pictured). "This marks the beginning of an important chapter in Scotland's story and allows the real debate to begin," said Cameron. "It paves the way so that the biggest question of all can be settled: A separate Scotland or a United Kingdom? I will be making a very positive argument for our United Kingdom." At the moment, a majority of Scots are against breaking away. However, the pro-independence movement may receive an emotional boost in 2014: It is the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockborn, in which a Scottish army led by Robert the Bruce defeated a horde of English invaders.

 

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