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Hurricane Sandy could wreak havoc on northeast
 
Motorists head north on the Loop Parkway in Lido Beach, N.Y., as Hurricane Sandy approaches on Oct. 27.
Motorists head north on the Loop Parkway in Lido Beach, N.Y., as Hurricane Sandy approaches on Oct. 27.
Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Hurricane Sandy has left 58 people dead in the Caribbean, and is making its way north to the U.S. where it could affect an 800-mile swath from the East Coast to the Great Lakes. The so called Frankenstorm is expected to be unusually powerful in the area because it is expected to meet with a winter storm plus a cold front, and high tides from a full moon. Officials warned people to be prepared for rain to begin late on Sunday, to be followed by several days of rain, high winds, and possibly snow. Forecasters say the danger is not limited to coastal areas, and that they are more worried about inland flooding from storm surge. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Delaware ordered mandatory evacuations for coastal communities by 8 p.m. Sunday. Sandy's winds were still at 75 mph as of Sunday morning.

 

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