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Sandy batters the Northeast
A man walks past a barricaded subway entrance in lower Manhattan as Hurricane Sandy approaches on Oct. 29.
A man walks past a barricaded subway entrance in lower Manhattan as Hurricane Sandy approaches on Oct. 29.
Andrew Burton/Getty Images
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urricane Sandy hammered New York and New Jersey with high winds and a record-breaking storm surge on Monday, killing at least 16 people and leaving six million without power. In New York City, bridges remained closed Tuesday and seven subway tunnels under the East River were flooded. Surging water knocked out backup power at NYU Langone Medical Center, forcing the evacuation of patients. Towns along the New Jersey shore were devastated. "The ocean is in the road, there are trees down everywhere," one resident said. "I've never seen it this bad." With tropical storm force winds extending nearly 500 miles from the storm's eye, Sandy downed trees from the Carolinas to Canada. As the tropical system clashed with winter weather from the west and north, it dumped snow as far south as North Carolina. Early Tuesday, Sandy headed inland, downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone as its winds slowed to 65 mph and it headed for the eastern Great Lakes. 

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