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Tel Aviv bus bombing complicates ceasefire talks
Israeli soldiers prepare weapons in a deployment area on Israel's border with the Gaza Strip on Nov. 19.
Israeli soldiers prepare weapons in a deployment area on Israel's border with the Gaza Strip on Nov. 19.
Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images
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ilitants bombed a public transit bus in Tel Aviv on Wednesday, injuring 22 people and heightening tension between Israel and Hamas, as the two sides attempt to broker a ceasefire to end an eight-day conflict in Gaza. Hamas praised the Tel Aviv attack, which happened near the headquarters of the Israel Defense Forces, but did not take responsibility. U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon condemned the attack, calling it "shocking," while the White House labeled it a "terrorist attack," with U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton offering Israel "any assistance" it requires. Clinton was in Israel Tuesday and Wednesday attempting to broker a truce between the two sides, meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, then with Palestinian Authority leader Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank. Abbas' group has a fraught relationship with Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip. Overnight and into Wednesday, Israeli bombs and artillery turned buildings, tunnels, and bridges in Gaza into rubble in 100 strikes confirmed by Israeli authorities. (Pictured: Israeli troops near the Gaza border.)

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