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WATCH: The hedonistic Spring Breakers trailer
The edgy new sex-and-crime thriller stars Disney Channel alums Selena Gomez and Vanessa Hudgens
 
James Franco wearing cornrows and a gold grill, enough said.
James Franco wearing cornrows and a gold grill, enough said. Facebook/Spring Breakers

The trailer: "Bikinis and big booties, ya'll… that's what life's about!' screams James Franco in the first trailer for Harmony Korine's Spring Breakers — and it looks like the film itself follows the same philosophy. (Watch the Spring Breakers trailer below.) The buzzy (and sure to be controversial) Spring Breakers, which is scheduled to hit theaters in March, follows four female college students — including Disney Channel alumni Selena Gomez and Vanessa Hudgens — who commit a robbery in order to finance a wild spring break trip. It isn't long before they hook up with Alien (James Franco), a charismatic criminal, and get drawn further into the world of crime and deceit. As scandalous as Spring Breakers may sound to Disney Channel fans, the film is just as much a departure for director Harmony Korine, who made his name with grimy indie films like Kids, Gummo, and Julien Donkey-Boy. Does the hedonistic Spring Breakers look like a party worth attending, or should audiences steer clear?

The reaction: Spring Breakers is "sure to be one of the most buzzworthy and talked-about films of the year," says Kara Warner at MTV News. This trailer is "bright, shiny and sexy with an irresistibly dark, almost forbidding undercurrent," and audiences will surely want to see more. "You've never seen Selena Gomez like this," agrees Megan Angelo at Glamour; the shock of seeing two formerly squeaky-clean Disney stars firing guns in neon-string bikinis is potent, to say the least. But does Spring Breakers have anything else to offer? "Once we've gotten over the shock value, Korine has to give us something else to sink our teeth into," says Sean O'Connell at CinemaBlend, and the underwhelming reviews Spring Breakers earned on the festival circuit last year are a worrying sign that the film might not have much else going for it.

 

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