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McDonald's is killing it on Wall Street
Americans must really like hamburgers
Dear early investors of McDonald's: We hope you're enjoying life on your private island.
Dear early investors of McDonald's: We hope you're enjoying life on your private island. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
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s McDonald's continues to evolve, revamping its fat-drenched menu with healthy-ish McWrap sandwiches and working to mend what one executive reportedly described as "broken" customer service, the ubiquitous burger chain's stock price is hitting record numbers — it closed above $103 per share on Friday — and analysts are predicting that it will continue to climb.

UBS, the Swiss global financial service, raised its price target for McDonald's Corp this week to $110, setting the upside at $125.

The stock is already up more than 15 percent this to year, and is touching these highs after a 52-week low in November.

Investors are pleased. Seeking Alpha explains:

The company has had an average annual growth rate of 5.4 percent in revenues and an average annual growth rate of net income of 15.7 percent over the period of 2003-12. This shows the profit margin that the company possesses has been increasing at a faster rate than the revenues. In its last annual report, the company increased the cash dividends by 10 percent to $0.77 for the fourth quarter, bringing the current annual dividend to $3.08 per share. This suggests the management has provided return to its shareholders for its strong business performance. [Seeking Alpha]

The best news of all is for the lucky dogs who scooped up some Mickey D's stock in the first few years after the burger joint went public. According to this chart, if you bought McDonald's stock in January 1970, you've seen a 30,305.05 percent gain on your investment. If only!

Carmel Lobello is the business editor at TheWeek.com. Previously, she was an editor at DeathandTaxesMag.com.

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