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10 things you need to know today: August 18, 2013
Egypt's cabinet discusses dissolving the Muslim Brotherhood following mosque killings, British police re-investigate Princess Diana's death, and more
 
Mourners attend a funeral at the Hammad Mosque in Cairo on Aug. 18.
Mourners attend a funeral at the Hammad Mosque in Cairo on Aug. 18. Ed Giles/Getty Images

1. EGYPT'S CABINET TO DISCUSS DISSOLVING MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD AS VIOLENCE CONTINUES
After soldiers fired on a Cairo mosque where supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi had taken shelter yesterday, Egypt's cabinet is discussing a proposal to legally dissolve the Muslim Brotherhood. Hundreds of anti-government Islamists, key supporters of Morsi, have died in clashes in recent days. The government continues to crack down on their protests, but more demonstrations are planned around Cairo on Sunday. The EU is said to be preparing to "urgently review" its relations with Egypt in light of the crisis. [The New York Times, BBC]
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2. MORE CREWS ARRIVE TO FIGHT IDAHO WILDFIRE
A wildfire stoked by strong winds pushed north Saturday and forced more people from their homes outside the posh central Idaho ski town of Ketchum, bringing the number of residences evacuated by the blaze to more than 2,300. The blaze was ignited by lightning on Aug. 7. The fire is 6 percent contained, and more firefighters are arriving on the scene. [USA Today]
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3. U.N. INSPECTORS ARRIVE IN SYRIA TO PROBE CHEMICAL ATTACKS
U.N. inspectors arrived Sunday in Damascus, Syria, to investigate the alleged use of chemical weapons, as Syria's government vowed to fully cooperate with them. The teams will investigate the alleged use of chemical weapons in three areas, in particular the March 19 attack that President Bashar Assad blames on rebels. Assad had refused to allow a broader investigation into allegations of chemical use. [Associated Press]
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4. RAND PAUL CALLS NSA'S PROGRAM UNCONSTITUTIONAL
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) said on Fox News Sunday that the National Security Agency's spying program is "fundamentally unconstitutional." Paul added that the founders intended for warrants to apply to individuals, not to widespread groups. Paul also said the bulk collection of data causes the nation's intelligence agencies to miss suspicious activities, citing the example of Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the older of the pair of brothers accused of bombing the Boston Marathon. [Politico]
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5. BO XILAI TO GO ON TRIAL THURSDAY
Disgraced Chinese politician Bo Xilai will go on trial Thursday on corruption charges. Sunday's announcement of a trial date puts China's new leaders on track to wrap up the scandal as they try to cement their authority. Bo fell from power last year after scandals involving the murder of a British businessman by Bo's wife and a thwarted defection bid by his former police chief were uncovered. [CBS News]
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6. PENN STATE REACHES FIRST SETTLEMENT IN SANDUSKY VICTIM SUITS
The first settlement in the civil suits against Penn State over sexual abuse by former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was finalized Saturday. The victim's lawyer said the settlement terms are bound by a confidentiality agreement with the school, but that "the compensation was fair and adequate." Sandusky was convicted in June 2012 on 45 counts of child sex abuse, ranging from corruption of minors to involuntary deviate sexual intercourse. He was sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison. [CNN]
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7. JPMORGAN PROBED OVER CHINA HIRES
U.S. authorities have opened an investigation into whether JPMorgan Chase hired the children of powerful Chinese officials to help it win business in China. Investment banks have a long history of employing the children of China's politically connected. The China hiring probe comes while JPMorgan faces intense scrutiny following the $6 billion trading loss it suffered in the "London whale" derivatives scandal. [Reuters]
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8. BRITISH POLICE RE-INVESTIGATING PRINCESS DIANA'S DEATH
Scotland Yard announced Saturday that police officers are examining claims that the British military masterminded Princess Diana's 1997 death. Conspiracy theories first emerged within hours of the fatal crash that killed Diana and Dodi Fayed when their car struck a pillar in the Alma Tunnel in Paris. Official inquiries concluded that their driver was drunk and had crashed accidentally during paparazzi pursuit. [The Daily Beast]
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9. TEJADA SUSPENDED FOR 105 GAMES AFTER POSITIVE DRUG TEST
Kansas City Royals infielder Miguel Tejada will get a 105-game suspension — one of the longest in major league history — after he tested positive on multiple occasions for Adderall, an amphetamine used to treat attention-deficit disorder. The six-time All-Star had previously tested positive under the league's amphetamine policy, which made him automatically subject to a 25-game ban for a second test and an 80-game suspension for a third. [NPR]
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10. ROBIN THICKE SUES TO PROTECT "BLURRED LINES"
A lawsuit was filed Thursday in California federal court by Robin Thicke, Pharrell Williams, and Clifford Harris Jr. against Marvin Gaye's family and Bridgeport Music. At issue are complaints about similarities between summer tune "Blurred Lines" and at least two songs. According to the suit, the "Gaye defendants are claiming ownership of an entire genre, as opposed to a specific work." [The Hollywood Reporter]

 
Terri is a freelance writer at TheWeek.com. She's a graduate of Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism, and has worked at TIME and Brides.

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