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Today in history: August 28
In 1917, suffragists were jailed for demanding the right to vote
 
John Hinkley Jr. arrives at the Marine Corps base at Quantico, Va. on Aug. 18, 1981.
John Hinkley Jr. arrives at the Marine Corps base at Quantico, Va. on Aug. 18, 1981. Bettmann/CORBIS

Aug. 28, 1917: Leaving the White House, President Woodrow Wilson was hounded by women suffragists demanding the right to vote. Some of the women protesting were tossed in jail. They went on hunger strikes and were force fed. Wilson, appalled, agreed to their demand and said he would support the 19th amendment. In 1920 it was passed, officially giving women the right to vote.

Aug. 28, 1981: John Hinckley Jr. pleaded not guilty of an attempt to kill President Reagan. Hinckley was later found not guilty by reason of insanity in the attempted assassination of the president. Reagan's press secretary, a Secret Service officer, and a Washington policeman were also wounded in the assassination attempt.

Quote of the Day

"If you want to make enemies, try to change something." - Woodrow Wilson

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