RSS
Today in history: October 21
In 1921, President Harding condemned the lynching of African Americans
 
Warren Harding was the first U.S. president to publicly condemn the lynching of blacks.
Warren Harding was the first U.S. president to publicly condemn the lynching of blacks. CORBIS

Oct. 21, 1921: In the first public remarks by a sitting president on the subject, President Harding, in Alabama, condemned the lynching of African Americans. The 1920s was a time of deep racism in the South; Harding's support of full civil rights for blacks encountered intense opposition.

Oct. 21, 1984: Acknowledging his own age, President Reagan said he would not make an issue of presidential opponent Walter Mondale's youth and inexperience. Reagan's line during his second debate with former Vice President Mondale was a response to a poor performance in their first debate — when Reagan said he was "confused," didn't know what city he was in, and said soldiers wore "wardrobes."

Quote of the Day

"Let every man, every corporation and especially let every village, town and city, every county and State, get out of debt and keep out of debt. It is the debtor that is ruined by hard times." — Rutherford B. Hayes

More from West Wing Reports...

 

THE WEEK'S AUDIOPHILE PODCASTS: LISTEN SMARTER

Subscribe to the Week