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Today in history: November 11
In 1919, President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed the first Armistice Day to honor the nation's veterans
Wilson proclaimed the first Armistice Day one year after "the war to end all wars" ended.
Wilson proclaimed the first Armistice Day one year after "the war to end all wars" ended. (CORBIS)

Nov. 11, 1919: President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed the first Armistice Day, to honor the nation's veterans. Coming one year to the day after the end of World War I — "the war to end all wars" — Wilson said, "To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with lots of pride in the heroism of those who died in the country's service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations." Armistice Day is now known, of course, as Veterans Day.

Nov. 11, 1921: President Warren Harding dedicated the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery. Holding unidentified remains of U.S. soldiers, the Tomb is inscribed, "Here rests in honored glory an American soldier known but to God." Guarded solemnly around the clock, the Tomb of the Unknowns is a must-see for any visitor to Washington. Of Arlington National Cemetery itself, it is said to be "where valor proudly sleeps."

Quote of the Day

"You will never know how much it has cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you will make good use of it." — John Quincy Adams

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