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10 things you need to know today: November 28, 2013
Another delay for ObamaCare, a massive airline merger clears a major hurdle, and more
Give up some landing rights, push through your merger.
Give up some landing rights, push through your merger. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

1. ObamaCare online sign-up delayed for small businesses
The Obama administration is delaying online enrollment for a key element of its health-care law, the Small Business Health Options Program, until November of 2014. White House officials had already postponed the enrollment period until the end of this month, but ongoing problems with Healthcare.gov has forced them to push it back even further. Coverage under the program will begin in January 2015. [The New York Times]
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2. Stores reject "Gray Thursday"
Despite the growing trend for retailers to open on Thanksgiving to get a bigger slice of the holiday shopping pie, several major stores are saying, "Thanks but no thanks." Nordstrom, Burlington Coat Factory, Trader Joe's, and Home Depot are a few of the large chains staying closed today. Appliance store P.C. Richard & Son has gone so far as to publish ads in newspapers urging people to "Save Thanksgiving." [ABC]
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3. Major airline merger overcomes legal obstacle
A federal bankruptcy judge has cleared the way for U.S. Air and American Airlines to merge. Judge Sean Lane ruled that the U.S. government's settlement in the antitrust case against the companies didn't alter American's bankruptcy-reorganization plan. The Justice Department sued in August to stop the deal but settled once the companies agreed to give up some landing rights at airports near Washington, D.C., and New York City. [ABC]
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4. Berlusconi gets booted from Italian Senate
The Italian Senate has banished former Premier Silvio Berlusconi from Parliament because he was convicted of tax fraud. No stranger to scandal, Berlusconi pledged to remain active in Italian politics and told his millions of supporters, "From outside the Parliament, we can continue to fight for our liberty." [The Washington Post]
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5. Tensions roil Thailand
Mass protests in Thailand, the biggest since 2010, have engulfed the country and highlighted the ongoing struggles between the opposition party and the family of the current prime minister. Protesters stormed government buildings as the lawmakers began debating a no-confidence vote against the current government, despite its large majority in Parliament. The prime minister's brother, Thaksin Shinawatra, is the main focus of the protesters' ire. He was removed from power by a coup in 2006, but his sister is trying to pass laws that pave the way for him to return from self-imposed exile in Dubai. [The Economist]
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6. Mike Huckabee's radio program ends
After spending a year and a half doing a daily radio show, Mike Huckabee announced his program will end Dec. 12. The former Arkansas governor's show, which debuted in April 2012, ran from noon to 3 p.m. on 200 stations across the United States. Huckabee said it was a mutual decision with his employer Cumulus Media. [Politico]
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7. Sriracha maker ordered to curb strong smells
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has ordered Huy Fong Foods, the makers of Sriracha, to halt plant operations that spew noxious odors into the air. A group of Irwindale residents sued the company, alleging the fumes from the plant irritated people's noses and throats. The judge's order is an interim step designed to give relief to the residents until the lawsuit concludes. [USA Today]
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8. Americans turning to layaway this holiday season
In an effort to avoid high interest charges, Americans are refraining from using their credit cards to buy holiday gifts this year. Instead, they're turning to an old standby: the layaway program. Unlike plastic, layaway doesn't accrue interest charges. And to make it more affordable, many retailers are waiving initial fees to entice more customers to use the service. Critics note, however, that cancelation fees can be proportionally higher than credit card interest. [NBC]
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9. The New York Times displays a nipple on its front page
To illustrate a story about the prevalence of the breast cancer gene in Israel, the editors of The New York Times used a picture of a woman's torso with a small part of the nipple exposed. The photo, which ran above the fold, caused quite a stir on the internet, where reactions ranged from moral outrage to outright giddiness. The photographer said she didn't mean for the image to be provocative, adding that "it was an unplanned moment." [New York]
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10. Teen assassin from Mexico to live in the U.S.
Seventeen-year-old Edgar Jimenez Lugo served three years behind bars after he admitted to killing for a major drug cartel. Now he's being released and will move to San Antonio, Texas. Nicknamed, "El Ponchis," Lugo first killed at the age of 11 and murdered four people by the time he was 14. Because he was born in San Diego and there are no outstanding warrants against him in the United States, Lugo is allowed to return to the country. [Los Angeles Times]

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Laura Colarusso
Laura Colarusso is a freelance journalist based in Boston. She has previously written for Newsweek, The Boston Globe, the Washington Monthly and The Daily Beast.

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