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10 things you need to know today: January 15, 2014
The FCC's net neutrality rules are struck down, a judge deems Oklahoma's gay-marriage ban unconstitutional, and more
 
A happy couple on their way to be married on October 31, 2013. 
A happy couple on their way to be married on October 31, 2013.  (Rick Wilking/Reuters/Corbis)

1. Appeals court tosses out net neutrality rules
An appeals court on Tuesday struck down the Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality rules, which require Internet service providers to treat all web traffic equally. The decision could transform online access by allowing Internet service providers to charge content companies such as Netflix to deliver their fare to customers at accelerated speeds. Tech experts warned the ruling could mean higher fees for consumers and barriers for startups. [The New York Times, Los Angeles Times]
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2. Judge rules Oklahoma's gay-marriage ban unconstitutional
A federal judge ruled Oklahoma's gay marriage ban unconstitutional on Tuesday. U.S. District Judge Terence Kern said a state constitutional amendment limiting marriage to the union of a man and a woman violated the U.S. Constitution's Equal Protection Clause. Kern immediately stayed the ruling pending an appeal, so same-sex couples won't be able to wed in the state any time soon. [Fox News]
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3. Christie faces Bridgegate head on in speech
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie briefly but directly confronted the Bridgegate scandal in his annual State of the State address Tuesday night. Christie said his administration let down its constituents when top aides allegedly closed part of the George Washington Bridge in retaliation against a Democratic mayor. Christie said he would make sure "this breach of trust" never happens again. [Politico]
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4. Obama plans surveillance restraints
President Obama reportedly plans to issue new guidelines on limiting government surveillance, including curtailing the collection of bulk telephone data. People briefed on his policies, set to be announced Friday, say he won't back the most drastic proposals advisers have floated, including leaving all bulk data in the hands of telecommunications companies or requiring court approval for data collection in the name of national security. [The New York Times]
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5. Judiciary objects to proposed spy-court reforms
Judges on the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court told Congress on Tuesday that they're against proposed reforms, including putting an independent privacy advocate on the spy court. Speaking for the U.S. judiciary, U.S. District Judge John D. Bates said in a letter to the Senate Intelligence Committee the reforms would not do much to protect privacy, but could hamper the court's handling of sensitive counterterrorism cases. [Politico]
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6. Two teens wounded in New Mexico middle-school shooting
A 12-year-old boy was arrested Tuesday for allegedly shooting two fellow students at a Roswell, N.M., middle school. Authorities said a 14-year-old boy thought to be the target of the attack was shot twice in the face with a shotgun. He was in critical condition at a Lubbock, Texas, hospital. The other victim, a 13-year-old girl, was hit in the arm. A social studies teacher, John Masterson, talked the suspect into putting the gun down. [HTR News]
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7. State Department rebukes Israeli minister for badmouthing Kerry
The State Department responded harshly Tuesday to remarks attributed to Israel's defense minister, Moshe Yaalon, questioning Secretary of State John Kerry's motives for trying to mediate peace talks with the Palestinians. Yaalon told a popular daily Israeli newspaper, Yedioth Ahronot, that Kerry was pushing for negotiations with "messianic fervor." The State Department called the comments "offensive and inappropriate," and Yaalon apologized. [CNN]
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8. World Bank economists see growth picking up in 2014
The World Bank released its latest global growth forecast on Tuesday, predicting a widespread return to economic growth in 2014, led by the U.S., after years of recession and a spotty recovery. The bank's economists project growth increasing from last year's 2.4 percent to 3.2 percent this year, with the pace continuing through 2015. The the Federal Reserve's tapering of its bond-buying stimulus could offset some of the improvement. [The New York Times]
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9. American journalist kicked out of Russia after criticizing Putin
In a move reminiscent of the Cold War, Russia has expelled an American author and journalist, David Satter, who has been critical of President Vladimir Putin. Satter had been working as an adviser to Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty since September. He had gone to the Ukrainian capital Kiev to get a new visa and was told his application had been rejected because his presence in Russia was "undesirable." [CNN]
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10. Judge says NFL settlement might not be enough
A federal judge, Anita Brody, on Tuesday preliminarily rejected the NFL's $765 million settlement of concussion claims by more than 4,500 former players, saying she's concerned it might not be enough. The money would have to cover payouts, medical tests, and treatment for 18,000 retirees over the 65 years of the agreement, and Brody said she saw nothing to ensure that the money wouldn't run out. [The Washington Post]

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Harold Maass is a contributing editor at TheWeek.com. He has been writing for The Week since the 2001 launch of the U.S. print edition. Harold has worked for a variety of news outlets, including The Miami HeraldFox News, and ABC News.

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