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12 more insane movie props you can buy on eBay right now
Express your love for your favorite movie by spending thousands of dollars to acquire a small part of it
You can be the proud owner of one of those creepy tentacles!
You can be the proud owner of one of those creepy tentacles! (Facebook.com/Spider-Man 2)
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f you think of eBay at all, it's probably as a kind of a digital flea market — a place for sellers to put their old records, collectible dolls, and Pez dispensers where aficionados can easily find them.

But eBay also has a wonderfully weird side where hardcore movie fans can acquire props, both iconic and banal, that have been culled from a wide variety of film sets. The last time we explored the wealth of props available on eBay, we uncovered an oar from Titanic, a car from Death Proof, and a dinosaur cage from Jurassic Park.

What else does the auction site have to offer? A guide:

1. Spider from Arachnophobia — $50


If you know someone who actually has arachnophobia, why not give them the gift of irony this year? This rubber spider from the 1990 cult hit Arachnophobia also comes with a DVD copy of the film, so you can remember why it's supposed to be scary in the first place.

2. Michael Cera's drum machine from Nick & Nora's Infinite Playlist — $64.99


If you want to flash back to a brief, magical time when Michael Cera could top-line a movie, scoop up this drum machine from the 2008 indie rom-com Nick & Nora's Infinite Playlist. According to the seller, the drum kit actually works, though you probably shouldn't use it because "it is never a good idea to store batteries in collectible electronics." Yes, you may have to give up that dream of starting a Nick & Nora tribute band.

3. Wonka's Whipple-Scrumptious Fudgemallow Delight Bar from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory — $115


The last time we dipped into the world of eBay prop sales, we uncovered a Scrumdidilyumptious Bar from 1971's Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory for a cool $16,503. If that's a little too rich for you, the auction site has turned up an alternative: A Wonka bar from 2005's vastly inferior remake. If a Whipple-Scrumptious Fudegmallow Delight Bar isn't to your taste, the seller is also offering up a Triple Dazzle Caramel Bar and a Chilly Chocolate Creme Bar; unfortunately, none of them contain any real chocolate, so your taste doesn't actually matter at all.

4. Hill Valley Telegraph clip from Back to the Future Part II — $650


There is no shortage of memorable props from the sequel to 1985's all-time comedy classic Back to the Future — but alas, there are no hoverboards or self-lacing Nikes available on eBay. Fans will have to make due with this clip from the Hill Valley Telegraph, which documents the destruction of Doc Brown's mansion.

5. Coco Bongo club door from The Mask — $3,500


Do you want to turn your personal residence into a vague approximation of the club where Jim Carrey danced in The Mask? Do you want to spend thousands of dollars to do it? Then start the process by acquiring this enormous golden door, replete with a golden monkey caricature.

6. Eminem's hat from 8 Mile — $4,500


When is an ordinary skullcap worth $4,500? When it once graced the head of Eminem in 8 Mile. Wear this and see if you channel Rabbit at your next rap battle. (Note: Mom's spaghetti not included.)

7. Doctor Octopus' tentacle from Spider-Man 2 — $4,995


There are a surprising number of screen-used Spider-Man props on eBay — anybody in the market for a pumpkin bomb or Aunt May's engagement ring? But the clear highlight is this 11-foot metal tentacle worn by Alfred Molina's Doctor Octopus in Spider-Man 2. Unfortunately, it's also the only tentacle available, so you'll have to conquer the world with just one.

8. Batman costume from Batman Returns — $14,995


This costume, which was worn by both Michael Keaton and his stuntman in 1992's Batman Returns, is a little worse for wear. The cape is long gone, and the yellow bat emblem has been ripped from the chest. Still, the seller cautions that a full costume generally retails for at least $40,000 — so any bargain-hunting crime fighters will probably need to make the best of it.

9. Captain Hook oil painting from Hook — $18,650


This oil painting of Hook's Captain Hook, which hung proudly in the cabin of his pirate ship, doesn't exactly come cheap. But if your idea of fine art is Dustin Hoffman with curling locks and a hipster mustache, this is literally your only option.

10. Suzanne's trap from Saw: The Final Chapter — $28,733.86


Here's an absurdly expensive prop that doubles as a way to ensure no one ever visits your apartment again. According to the seller, this trap from Saw: The Final Chapter "moved Suzanne closer and closer to the spikes…until, finally, the spikes stabbed her through the eyes and mouth." But if the idea of a psychotic killer's torture chamber appearing on eBay gives you pause, never fear — the seller says it's "not guaranteed to work." Comforting!

11. Cosmic Cube from Captain America: The First Avenger — $30,000


How can anyone possibly justify selling a piece of translucent plastic for the price of a new car? Because that piece of translucent plastic is the Cosmic Cube — the MacGuffin at the heart of 2011's Captain America: The First Avenger. It's a steep asking price, but this might be the best time to buy; according to the seller, this could end up being even more valuable if it ends up factoring into the story of the upcoming Avengers: Age of Ultron

12. Ivan Drago's boots from Rocky IV — $45,000


What could possibly cost more than the device of indescribable power that lies at the center of the most popular franchise in recent movie history? The boots Dolph Lundgren slipped his sweaty feet into for 1985's Rocky IV. The seller notes that Lundgren actually signed the boots "To Adidas" — so if you happen to be a hardcore footwear fan, bid now before someone else swipes these out from under you.

Want to see what other strange items have appeared on the auction site? Read about 11 crazy props that were once available on eBay.

(All photos via ebay.com)

Scott Meslow is the entertainment editor for TheWeek.com. He has written about film and television at publications including The AtlanticOutside Magazine, and Think Progress.

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