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When it comes to enrolling in benefits this year, the worst thing you can do is nothing, says Terri Cullen in The Wall Street Journal. It used to be that when a Wall Street CEO fell, “a dozen subordinates lined up to kick it into the net,” says Michael Le
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ow not to flub open enrollment

When it comes to enrolling in benefits this year, the worst thing you can do is nothing, says Terri Cullen in The Wall Street Journal. Your current health plan may no longer roll over if you choose “to not make a choice,” leaving you coverage-free for a year. So look at the offerings and and consider “your health and your stage in life.” Kids or health problems? “Lean toward flexible plans with low deductibles.” Young, healthy, or rich? You might “be better off with a high-deductible plan and a health-savings account.”

What it takes to be a Wall Street CEO

It used to be that when a Wall Street CEO fell, “a dozen subordinates lined up to kick it into the net,” says Michael Lewis in Bloomberg. But today’s bench of able successors is pretty empty. So “what, exactly, are the qualifications of a Wall Street CEO” these days? To start, you must have an “extraordinary ability to be paid huge sums of money each year without losing composure.” Be prepared to squelch ambitious “underlings” who could take your place. And you must be comfortable “gambling big time with shareholders’ capital”—and accepting a “nine-figure severance package” if you lose.

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