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Civil rights, Port security
Employees who complain about discrimination in the workplace are protected from retaliation under federal civil-rights laws, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled this week. The decisions in two related cases contrast sharply with a decision last year . .
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o retaliation over bias claims
Employees who complain about discrimination in the workplace are protected from retaliation under federal civil-rights laws, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled this week. The decisions in two related cases contrast sharply with a decision last year that set strict time limits for employees to file discrimination claims. The latest rulings could have a broad impact because it is often easier for employees to show that retaliation has occurred than to prove their original complaints of race, gender, or age bias.

Port security faulted
Post-9/11 efforts to improve port security are falling dangerously short, a government report found. Under a federal inspection program, shippers can receive less scrutiny of their cargo if they submit detailed security plans with the Department of Homeland Security. But the Government Account­ability Office said customs officials are granting security waivers without independently confirming that shippers are actually complying with their security protocols. Instead, citing “limited resources,” customs officials rely on the companies’ assurances that security measures are being enforced.

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