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Deerhoof
Deerhoof's new release, <em>Offending Maggie,</em> is a &ldquo;beguiling" and&nbsp; "characteristically uproarious&rdquo; album, said Nate Chinen in <em>The New York Times.</em>
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eerhoof
Offend Maggie
(Kill Rock Stars)

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Deerhoof has always moved to its own tune, said Spencer Kornhaber in Spin. Frontwoman Satomi Matsuzaki and the rest of the San Francisco art-rock band do “what comes naturally” to them, “no matter how unnatural it may sound” to everyone else. On the group’s ninth album, Offend Maggie, Matsuzaki chirps about basketballs and bunnies, alternating between English and her native Japanese. Greg Saunier “shatters his itty-bitty drum kit as if doing his daily reps” while guitarists John Dietrich and Ed Rodriguez pile giant riffs atop “playful vocal-mimicking lines.” The group certainly has its formula down, said Nate Chinen in The New York Times. Offend Maggie is a “beguiling, characteristically uproarious” album, seething with “brightly tolling dissonances, lurching dynamic shifts, and oddball song constructions.” Throughout the album, Matsuzaki adds all sorts of “earnest but off-kilter” touches. Some work, like the cutesy la-la-las of “Chandelier Searchlight.” Others don’t, such as lampooning the most high in “This Is God Speaking.” Nevertheless, the album offers the “most accessible entries in Deerhoof’s willfully strange catalogue,” said Simon Vozick-Levinson in Entertainment Weekly. It’ll “send your head spinning without making it ache.”

 

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