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A gay version of the Bible
Is a gay interpretation of the Bible necessary, or just provocative?
 

It’s no surprise that this news has “provoked upset among Christians,” said Alison Flood in the Guardian. American filmmaker Max Mitchell recently announced that his film production company, Revision, will publish “a gay version of the Bible, in which God says it is better to be gay than straight.” It’s to be called the Princess Diana Bible—supposedly named because of her good deeds—and Revision will “adapt and direct the revised Bible as a two-part mini-series, The Gay Old Testament and The Gay New Testament.”

This is clearly “inspired by a political agenda,” said Douglas Howe in Beliefnet, “and one person's desire to contort not only the text but the very context of it to suit his own perspective.” This is part of the problem with our culture: It’s “growing more and more confused about the difference between text and context, between story and standard, between art and history.”

If Christians are angry now, said Queerty, “wait ’til they find out that the Princess Diana Bible isn't even the first queeny-King of Kings Bible out there.” Last year, the Gay Bible was published, and it contains “many heretical things about letting gay people love each other and not mindlessly following scripture like a lemming.” But for what it’s worth, “sitting down and ‘turning the Bible gay’ is a pretty stupid use” of time.

Especially since the “Bible we already have is very pro-gay,” said Candace Chellew-Hodge in Religion Dispatches, despite what anti-gay people say. “There is absolutely no condemnation for loving, committed, gay and lesbian relationships within the pages of the Bible.” The gay and lesbian community needs to “make peace” with the Bible we already have, and everyone needs to realize that the real message of the Bible is that “God loves us all—no matter what.”

 

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