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FDR's suite at Harvard, and more
The Harvard University suite that Franklin Delano Roosevelt occupied as an undergraduate is being restored to its approximate appearance when he lived there.
 

FDR's suite at Harvard
The Harvard University suite that Franklin Delano Roosevelt occupied as an undergraduate is being restored to its approximate appearance when he lived there. FDR and a roommate lived in the 600-square-foot space in Adams House from 1900 to 1904. Although no photographs of the rooms exist, Harvard has many photos of similar rooms from the period, and the future president had described its decoration extensively in letters. The restoration will cost $250,000; at the fundraising kickoff last week, guests dined on a six-course re-creation of FDR’s freshman class dinner, including Blue Point oysters and Beef Richelieu.

A new species called Histiophryne psychedelica
Scientists have discovered a new species of anglerfish that can splay out its face, scuttle across the ocean bottom on fins that act like legs, and is so colorful that it has been named Histiophryne psychedelica. The 4-inch-long fish, which has turquoise-rimmed eyes and wild stripes of peach, tan, and light blue, was first spotted by commercial divers on the small island of Ambon, in Indonesia. Photos of the fish caught the attention of Ted Pietsch of the University of Washington, who sent a researcher to the scene; she captured a specimen and Pietsch confirmed it as a new species. “I pretty much freaked out,” he said.

San Francisco's fight over badminton fees
Ed Leong, 86, has been playing badminton for free on San Francisco’s municipal courts for 25 years. Naturally he was upset when the city’s Parks Department, determined to close a budget gap, began charging players $4 to rent the courts for 45 minutes. Leong soon gathered 200 signatures protesting the charge, presented the petition to Mayor Gavin Newsom, staged a rally in front of City Hall, and began complaining to local politicians. Last week, the  department relented and announced that it would charge badminton players only $1. “I guess we’re finally getting somewhere,” Leong said.

 

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