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A farm-to-table utopia in Georgia
Dining at the Farmhouse &shy;restaurant in Palmetto, Ga., is &ldquo;an almost worshipful experience,&rdquo; said Kevin Sack in <em>The New York Times. </em>
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ining at the Farmhouse ­restaurant in Palmetto, Ga., is “an almost worshipful experience,” said Kevin Sack in The New York Times. Established in 2006, the restaurant is housed in the Inn at Serenbe, about 30 miles southwest of downtown Atlanta. “A utopian experiment in New Urbanism,” Serenbe has become a showcase for the farm-to-table movement.

Serenbe derives its name from “a serene place to be.” Steve and Marie Nygren originally bought the 1905 farmhouse there as a weekend home. Later they purchased 900 acres adjacent to the property, converted the farmhouse into a bed-and-breakfast, and turned a series of tin-roofed cottages into “romantic hideaways.” They also planted gardens; began raising llamas, donkeys, rabbits, and goats; and added a croquet lawn, a labyrinth, and miles of hiking trails.

On a recent visit, dinner at the Farmhouse started with charred lamb carpaccio and “a melt-in-your-mouth” spinach-and-shrimp gnocchi. Next came two entrées: molasses-lacquered short ribs served over creamy grits, and wild Georgia shrimp on a bed of braised fennel, celery, pearl onions, and artichokes. Each course is paired with a different wine.

The Farmhouse at Serenbe, 10950 Hutcheson Ferry Road, (770) 463-2622.

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