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Channing Tatum in ‘Fighting’
The fighting is realistic in Dito Montiel's film, but is the dialogue?
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ito Montiel’s new movie Fighting “is much more involving than I thought it would be,” said Roger Ebert in the Chicago Sun-Times. Starring Channing Tatum as a small-town guy who gets wrapped up in New York City’s underground brawling circuit, Fighting “transcends the worldview that produced the ad campaign and gives audiences a well-crafted, touching experience.” (watch the trailer for Fighting)

Fighting is a “surprisingly visceral action flick,” said Rafer Guzmãn in Newsday, and “when it connects, you won't forget it”—the “beatings on screen are brutal enough to make you clutch your kidneys.” Unfortunately, the “excruciatingly bad dialogue may have you plugging your ears.”

Not only that, said Randy Cordova in The Arizona Republic, “the movie never gains any momentum and simply feels sluggish.” Fighting is “too dumb to be taken seriously and too slow to be a fun and mindless B flick.” While watching it, “all you do is wonder” if the lead character “suffered a head injury at some point.”

Also opening this week: The Soloist

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