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What dads want for Father's Day
And why they might not get it
S

orry, dads, said Jean E. Palmieri in Women's Wear Daily, but your loved ones might not be able to splurge on you this Father's Day. Thanks to the lingering recession, Americans are expected to spend a little less on Father's Day gifts this year—$90.89, on average, down from $94.54 in 2008, according to the National Retail Federation.

No problem, said Jennifer L. DeLeo in PC Magazine. Even if you're broke, and a procrastinator (Father's Day is Sunday), you can still get dad a great gift that's more original than the standard tie or wallet and costs less than $50. How about a CallPod Keeper Desktop ($14.95) for storing encrypted personal information on a desktop? Or a a Violight UV Razor Sanitizer ($29.95), or DLO Portable Speakers for iPhone?

Try just asking dad what he wants, said Kate Shatzkin in the Baltimore Sun. One father we consulted said he just wanted the grandparents to take care of baby so he and his wife could go to the movies. Another just wants the family to gather to watch the U.S. Open on TV and eat pizza. And don't underestimate the appeal of breakfast in bed and a homemade card from the kids.

Step one to finding the perfect gift is avoiding the worst ones, said Peter Hartlaub in the San Francisco Chronicle. Those would include the World's Greatest Dad T-shirt ($9.95), Old Spice ($5.79), and cartoon ties ($7.99). "If you do receive one of these ties, learn a lesson from your teenage daughter: Have the tie on when you walk out the door. When no one can see you anymore, strip down to whatever you really want to wear to work."

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