In Italy at the end of 1944, the Negro 92nd Infantry Division of the United States Army discovered two gaunt men who claimed they had escaped from a Nazi concentration camp. One man was thin and blonde with a "scholarly appearance." The other had brown skin, a slight build, and an erect carriage. After two years behind barbed wire, they said, they had fled the camp and gone on an incredible journey to reach the American lines: swimming in lakes, hiking through the snow-covered Apennines, and taking shelter in barns, caves, woods, and the homes of friendly partisan supporters. They claimed they dodged bullets and ate leaves to survive; they said they bore witness to the slaughter of women and babies. Their names were Reed Peggram, an African-American, and Gerdh Hauptmann, his Danish friend, and they were "ragged and near collapse from hunger and fatigue."

Max Johnson interviewing Reed Peggram and Gerdh Hauftman after their escape from a concentration camp, Dec. 30, 1944 | (The Baltimore Afro-American Archives/Courtesy Narratively)

Freelance war correspondent Max Johnson, writing for the Negro newspapers Call and Post, New York Amsterdam News, and Baltimore Afro-American, reported this curious find. The headlines that accompanied his stories were purposefully provocative: "Negro Escapes German Camp in Italy," "Two Scholars Flee Concentration Camp," "How Boston Lad Studying in Denmark Escaped Nazis," and "Boy Friends Scorn Bombs, Come Out OK." Although he reported their claims, Johnson was skeptical of Peggram's tale, not even believing that he was an American citizen, since his "accent was decidedly British." Another correspondent noted that Peggram claimed to have a bachelor's and master's from Harvard, that he spoke English flawlessly, along with four other languages, and that despite his ordeal, it was not his physical suffering that upset him most.

"One of my greatest losses was my diploma from Harvard," Peggram said. "They don't issue duplicates. But I still have my Phi Beta Kappa key."

The two men refused to leave each other's side, but it was not clear if Hauptmann would be allowed to return to the U.S. with Peggram. Johnson called their story, "a modern version of Damon and Pythias," referencing the Greek legend of loyalty between friends. Here were "bonds of friendship so strong that even the Nazis were unable to break them."

"If Peggram's story proves to be correct," wrote Johnson, "it will undoubtedly become one of the greatest human interest stories yet revealed in this war."

Reed Edwin Peggram was born on July 26, 1914, in Boston, Massachusetts. His father, Harvey Thomas Peggram, worked variously as a shorthand teacher, a self-employed card writer, and, according to his World War I draft card, an artist. Harvey was inducted into the United States Army on November 6, 1917, and served overseas as a private in the medical unit between May 15, 1918, and September 9, 1919. He returned from the war "100 percent disabled," and became a permanent resident at the Central State Hospital in Petersburg, Virginia, where he was treated for gas poisoning, according to his family. He would remain there until his death in 1956. For all intents and purposes, young Reed no longer had a father.

In the club photographs for the 1931 Boston Latin School literary and drama clubs, Peggram's face stands out as the only African American there. In a class of 262 students, Peggram ranked in the first quarter in scholarship. He received several awards and obtained honors on exams in Elementary Latin, Elementary French, Elementary German, and Advanced Latin. As it has been for hundreds of years of Boston Latin graduates, Harvard was the next step.

On his 1931 Harvard application, Peggram said he wanted "to become an accomplished linguist." He applied for multiple scholarships, stating on financial aid forms that his mother had three additional children with her new husband, "Mr. Farrar," and that his grandmother was his sole financial supporter. He also listed his father as dead. He was accepted to the college and distinguished himself, not just as a fine student but as one of the few black students at Harvard at the time.

Peggram's undergraduate Harvard photo, 1935 | (Harvard University Archives/Courtesy Narratively)

In 1934, applying for a Rhodes Scholarship, Peggram asked Dean A. Chester Hanford for a recommendation. "He is one of the highest scholars in his class," wrote Hanford. "Last November he was elected to membership in Phi Beta Kappa. He is a thorough gentleman." Hanford shared a copy of the letter with Peggram, who promptly thanked him. But there was another letter Peggram did not see.

"I wish to supplement my letter of May 29th to you about Mr. Reed Peggram by stating that he is a negro [sic]," Hanford wrote in his second letter. "It seemed to me that you should know that fact."

"Thank you for your testimonial and letter about Reed Peggram," responded tutor Andrew Sydenham Farrar Gow. "I should like to thank you however for telling me that Peggram is a Negro. I should certainly have been somewhat taken aback if I had admitted a man with such a name unwarned." Although Gow insisted this information would have no bearing, Peggram did not get the scholarship.

Peggram graduated from Harvard in 1935, magna cum laude, with the thesis, "A comparison of the personal element in Madame Bovary and L'Éducation Sentimentale." Over the next two years, he would get his master's from Harvard, study English and comparative literature at Columbia, and return to Harvard to begin work on his PhD. It is clear from Peggram's letters that while there, he became infatuated with Leonard Bernstein, who would later become famous for composing the music for West Side Story. Bernstein arrived at Harvard in 1935 and was also a graduate of the Boston Latin School — perhaps the two already knew each other from high school.

Read the rest of this story at Narratively.

Narratively is a digital publication and creative studio focused on ordinary people with extraordinary stories.