The Week: Most Recent from Jessica Hullingerhttp://theweek.com/editor/articles/jessica-hullingerMost recent posts.en-usMon, 22 Apr 2013 09:00:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent from Jessica Hullinger from THE WEEKMon, 22 Apr 2013 09:00:00 -040013 things I learned hanging out at the Wheel of Fortune sethttp://theweek.com/article/index/243027/13-things-i-learned-hanging-out-at-the-wheel-of-fortune-sethttp://theweek.com/article/index/243027/13-things-i-learned-hanging-out-at-the-wheel-of-fortune-set<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0095/47758_article_main/w/240/h/300/vanna-is-that-you.jpg?209" /></P><p>When I was in elementary school, my uncle told me he'd met Vanna White on a plane once. I was amazed &mdash; and jealous! I had endless questions: What was she like? Was she tall? Was she wearing one of her signature gowns? Did she have an entourage?</p><p>Like so many Americans, I grew up adoringly watching <em>Wheel of Fortune</em>. And so, when the show ditched its normal Los Angeles studio to tape several episodes at Madison Square Garden in honor of <em>Wheel</em>'s&nbsp;30th anniversary, I was immediately and completely in.</p><p>I had the distinct honor of meeting one-on-one with both Pat and Vanna, along with members...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/243027/13-things-i-learned-hanging-out-at-the-wheel-of-fortune-set">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Mon, 22 Apr 2013 09:00:00 -0400Live coverage: Two explosions rock the Boston Marathonhttp://theweek.com/article/index/242761/live-coverage-two-explosions-rock-the-boston-marathonhttp://theweek.com/article/index/242761/live-coverage-two-explosions-rock-the-boston-marathon<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0095/47583_article_main/w/240/h/300/a-photo-posted-on-the-907-rav-fm-twitter-feed-shows-one-of-the-two-reported-explosions-as-it.jpg?209" /></P><p>These were the latest updates as of 5:30 p.m. EST. For continued coverage, please follow our updates here.&nbsp;</p><noscript>[&amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="//storify.com/TheWeek/explosion-at-boston-marathon-finish-line" target="_blank"&amp;amp;amp;gt;View the story "Explosion at Boston Marathon finish line" on Storify&amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;gt;]</noscript> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/242761/live-coverage-two-explosions-rock-the-boston-marathon">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Mon, 15 Apr 2013 15:21:00 -0400Argentina's Jorge Mario Bergoglio is the new pope: Live updates on the papal conclavehttp://theweek.com/article/index/241300/argentinas-jorge-mariobergoglio-is-the-new-pope-live-updates-on-the-papal-conclavehttp://theweek.com/article/index/241300/argentinas-jorge-mariobergoglio-is-the-new-pope-live-updates-on-the-papal-conclave<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0093/46585_article_main/w/240/h/300/introducing-pope-francis-argentinean-cardinal-jorge-mario-bergoglio.jpg?209" /></P><p></p><noscript>[&amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="//storify.com/TheWeek/waiting-for-the-new-pope" target="_blank"&amp;amp;amp;gt;View the story "The new pope" on Storify&amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;gt;]</noscript> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/241300/argentinas-jorge-mariobergoglio-is-the-new-pope-live-updates-on-the-papal-conclave">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Wed, 13 Mar 2013 14:10:00 -0400Everything you need to know about meteor strikeshttp://theweek.com/article/index/240228/everything-you-need-to-know-about-meteor-strikeshttp://theweek.com/article/index/240228/everything-you-need-to-know-about-meteor-strikes<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0091/45856_article_main/w/240/h/300/a-fireball-looking-meteor-streaks-across-the-sky-of-russias-ural-mountains-on-feb-15.jpg?209" /></P><p>On Friday, a meteor exploded 32,000 feet above the Chelyabinsk region of Russia, lighting up the sky and producing a shockwave that shook buildings and shattered windows. At least 1,000 people were injured in the blasts, the highest toll ever caused by an object from space. Video footage of the meteorites, while mesmerizing, is also terrifying. It "appeals to our most primitive fears," tweeted&nbsp;<em>The Week</em>'s D.B. Grady. "It's an astonishing glimpse at the end of the world." Here's what you should know about Russia's meteor blast, and others like it:&nbsp;</p><p><strong>First off: What exactly is a meteor?...</strong></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/240228/everything-you-need-to-know-about-meteor-strikes">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Fri, 15 Feb 2013 12:02:00 -0500Is the hole in the ozone closing?http://theweek.com/article/index/240103/is-the-hole-in-the-ozone-closinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/240103/is-the-hole-in-the-ozone-closing<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0091/45791_article_main/w/240/h/300/earths-atmosphere-from-space.jpg?209" /></P><p>Since the 1980s, a hole in the ozone layer has loomed over Antarctica for three months of every year. During these months, the concentration of the ozone decreases, and harmful ultraviolet light, which causes sunburn and skin cancer, seeps through to the Earth's surface. Environmentalists have long looked to the ozone hole as evidence of man's negative impact on the atmosphere, but recent findings may ease their minds: Measurements indicate the hole in the ozone layer is the smallest it has been in 10 years, and could be completely gone within a few decades.</p><p>So why is it shrinking? The hole was...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/240103/is-the-hole-in-the-ozone-closing">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Wed, 13 Feb 2013 15:23:00 -0500WATCH LIVE: Alleged cop-killer Christopher Dorner engaged in shootouthttp://theweek.com/article/index/240025/watch-live-alleged-cop-killer-christopher-dorner-engaged-in-shootouthttp://theweek.com/article/index/240025/watch-live-alleged-cop-killer-christopher-dorner-engaged-in-shootout<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0091/45755_article_main/w/240/h/300/alleged-cop-killer-christopher-dorner-engaged-in-shootout.jpg?209" /></P><p>Former LAPD officer and alleged cop-killer Christopher Dorner was reportedly spotted in the remote area of Big Bear, Calif., on Tuesday afternoon. According to the <em>Los Angeles Times</em>, Dorner broke into a home and held a couple hostage before stealing their car. He then engaged in a shootout with federal authorities, reportedly injuring two deputy officers. <em>CBS </em>has a live feed of the event:&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/240025/watch-live-alleged-cop-killer-christopher-dorner-engaged-in-shootout">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Tue, 12 Feb 2013 17:05:00 -0500A social media guide to the State of the Unionhttp://theweek.com/article/index/239978/a-social-media-guide-to-the-state-of-the-unionhttp://theweek.com/article/index/239978/a-social-media-guide-to-the-state-of-the-union<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0091/45718_article_main/w/240/h/300/you-can-follow-the-president-on-twitternbspbarackobama.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">Tonight, President Obama will address Congress and the nation in his fourth State of the Union address, which is set to begin at 9 p.m. EST. If you won't be in front of a television &mdash; and even if you will be &mdash; be sure to follow along via social media. Here's how:&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p class="p1"><strong>Before the speech:&nbsp;</strong></p><p class="p1">At 7:30 p.m., chat live with White House reporter Paul Brandus on <em>The Week</em>'s Facebook page. He'll give you the lowdown on what to expect from tonight's address.</p><p class="p1"><strong>During the speech:&nbsp;</strong></p><p class="p1">On Twitter, subscribe to @TheWeek's list of key political players, which includes both reporters and...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/239978/a-social-media-guide-to-the-state-of-the-union">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Tue, 12 Feb 2013 09:35:00 -0500Why the Great Lakes are shrinkinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/239842/why-the-great-lakes-are-shrinkinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/239842/why-the-great-lakes-are-shrinking<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0091/45605_article_main/w/240/h/300/lake-michigan-as-seen-from-north-avenue-beach-chicago.jpg?209" /></P><p>The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced this week that two of America's Great Lakes, Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, are at their lowest water levels since recording began in 1918. The lakes were 29 inches below their long-term average, and down 17 inches since this time last year. "We're in an extreme situation," the Corps' Keith&nbsp;Kompoltowicz&nbsp;told&nbsp;<em>USA Today</em>.&nbsp;</p><p>The causes are threefold:</p><p>* Below-normal levels of rain and snowfall</p><p>* Record-high temperatures</p><p>* Dredging (the process of deepening navigational channels by removing layers of the bottom sediments)</p><p>Why should we...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/239842/why-the-great-lakes-are-shrinking">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Thu, 07 Feb 2013 11:00:00 -0500Next year's Super Bowl might not have a halftime showhttp://theweek.com/article/index/239652/next-years-super-bowl-might-not-have-a-halftime-showhttp://theweek.com/article/index/239652/next-years-super-bowl-might-not-have-a-halftime-show<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0090/45499_article_main/w/240/h/300/beyonce-might-not-have-a-super-bowl-successor-next-february.jpg?209" /></P><p>We hope you liked Beyonce's Super Bowl halftime performance, because it could be the last one for a couple years. Next year's big game will be played in New Jersey's open-air MetLife stadium, where the temperature is currently a frigid 27 degrees. And with next year's Super Bowl likely to be similarly cold,&nbsp;NFL officials reportedly aren't sure how to plan for the halftime show, as freezing temperatures could make the already-daunting task of quickly setting up and tearing down a massive stage even more difficult.</p><p>"It's not only the acts and the singers but [also] the crews that have to put...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/239652/next-years-super-bowl-might-not-have-a-halftime-show">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Mon, 04 Feb 2013 12:22:00 -0500Discovered under a parking lot: The body of King Richard IIIhttp://theweek.com/article/index/239643/discovered-under-a-parking-lot-the-body-of-king-richard-iiihttp://theweek.com/article/index/239643/discovered-under-a-parking-lot-the-body-of-king-richard-iii<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0090/45488_article_main/w/240/h/300/these-are-the-remains-of-king-richard-iii.jpg?209" /></P><p>History buffs, rejoice! Archaeologists say a skeleton found beneath a parking lot in 2012 belongs to England's King Richard III. "Beyond reasonable doubt it's Richard," lead archaeologist Richard Buckley announced&nbsp;on Monday. Richard reigned for two years, from 1483 until he was killed in battle in 1485 at the age of 32. He was buried unceremoniously in the town of Leicester, beneath a church that was demolished in the 16th century, its exact location forgotten over the many years since.</p><p>In late 2012, researchers began their search for the medieval king by using radar to scan for buried remains...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/239643/discovered-under-a-parking-lot-the-body-of-king-richard-iii">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Mon, 04 Feb 2013 10:35:00 -0500Did Iran fake its space monkey mission?http://theweek.com/article/index/239618/did-iran-fake-its-space-monkey-missionhttp://theweek.com/article/index/239618/did-iran-fake-its-space-monkey-mission<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0090/45466_article_main/w/240/h/300/is-this-the-same-monkey.jpg?209" /></P><p>On Monday, Iran proudly announced to the world that it had launched a monkey into space and successfully brought it back to Earth alive. But something is amiss: Upon further inspection, it appears the monkey that returned from space doesn't match the monkey that left. Images newly released from a press conference prior to the launch show a monkey with light fur and a conspicuous red mole above its eye. The mole is mysteriously missing on the monkey that returned, which also has notably darker hair.&nbsp;</p><p class="p2">"It looks like a very different monkey, the nose, the features, everything is different,"...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/239618/did-iran-fake-its-space-monkey-mission">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Fri, 01 Feb 2013 15:34:00 -0500WATCH: The first-ever footage of a thought being formedhttp://theweek.com/article/index/239603/watch-the-first-ever-footage-of-a-thought-being-formedhttp://theweek.com/article/index/239603/watch-the-first-ever-footage-of-a-thought-being-formed<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0090/45448_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-brains-neurons-light-up-as-a-thought-is-being-formed.jpg?209" /></P><p><iframe width="660" height="397" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Vo3TchUQM1w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p><p class="p1">In what is being called a "fundamental leap forward in our understanding of how brains work," Japanese researchers have successfully caught on film a thought being formed in the brain. And while the brain in this study belongs to a zebrafish, not a human, the footage is captivating, and sheds light on how researchers could use a similar technique to see how our brains work.&nbsp;</p><p class="p1">To observe the zebrafish brain's neurons in real time, researchers used a fluorescent probe that makes neurons light up when they're active. What was the zebrafish thinking about? Something we humans obsess about all...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/239603/watch-the-first-ever-footage-of-a-thought-being-formed">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Fri, 01 Feb 2013 11:15:00 -0500Is it exploitative to have Sandy Hook students perform at the Super Bowl?http://theweek.com/article/index/239540/is-it-exploitative-to-have-sandy-hook-students-perform-at-the-super-bowlhttp://theweek.com/article/index/239540/is-it-exploitative-to-have-sandy-hook-students-perform-at-the-super-bowl<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0090/45390_article_main/w/240/h/300/newtown-families-were-invited-onto-the-field-before-a-new-york-giants-game-on-dec-30.jpg?209" /></P><p>At Sunday's Super Bowl, 26 Sandy Hook Elementary students will sing "America The Beautiful" before Alicia Keys performs the national anthem. "Is there a touch of exploitation in the move?" asks Toni Monkovic at <em>The</em> <em>New York Times</em>, in a question she's surely not alone in posing.</p><p class="p1">The key to answering Monkovic's question is in asking two more: <strong>Who does this benefit? And is it doing any harm?</strong></p><p class="p1">At least arguably, this benefits the performing children by letting them express their grief through song. Then again, traveling the country, appearing on morning shows, and singing in front of millions of people...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/239540/is-it-exploitative-to-have-sandy-hook-students-perform-at-the-super-bowl">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Thu, 31 Jan 2013 11:05:00 -0500The Russian family that lived in isolation for 40 yearshttp://theweek.com/article/index/239449/the-russian-family-that-lived-in-isolation-for-40-yearshttp://theweek.com/article/index/239449/the-russian-family-that-lived-in-isolation-for-40-years<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0090/45364_article_main/w/240/h/300/an-aerial-view-of-the-siberian-taiga-where-a-family-of-five-lived-from-the-1930s-through-the-70s.jpg?209" /></P><p>In today's world of increasing&nbsp;inter-connectivity, the idea of living off the grid, in the middle of nowhere, with no contact with the outside world is almost inconceivable. We're constantly updated on the lives of our friends, both far and near. We get instant reports on the world's wars and financial woes. And that's why a new article in&nbsp;<em>Smithsonian</em>&nbsp;magazine about a family that lived in isolation for decades is so fascinating.&nbsp;Mike Dash tells&nbsp;the extraordinary story of the&nbsp;Lykovs, a Russian family that &mdash; fearing increasingly hostile religious persecution &mdash...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/239449/the-russian-family-that-lived-in-isolation-for-40-years">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Wed, 30 Jan 2013 13:30:00 -0500WATCH: Gabrielle Giffords calls for gun controlhttp://theweek.com/article/index/239414/watch-gabrielle-giffords-calls-for-gun-controlhttp://theweek.com/article/index/239414/watch-gabrielle-giffords-calls-for-gun-control<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0090/45345_article_main/w/240/h/300/gabrielle-giffords-prepares-to-give-an-opening-statement-during-a-hearing-about-gun-control-on-jan.jpg?209" /></P><p><object id="flashObj" width="660" height="397" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" data="http://c.brightcove.com/services/viewer/federated_f9?isVid=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"><param name="flashVars" value="videoId=2129356155001&amp;playerID=1409164951001&amp;playerKey=AQ~~,AAAAAETmrZQ~,EVFEM4AKJdRjek0MS21pRzf_GTDAM-xj&amp;domain=embed&amp;dynamicStreaming=true" /><param name="base" value="http://admin.brightcove.com" /><param name="seamlesstabbing" value="false" /><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="swLiveConnect" value="true" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><param name="src" value="http://c.brightcove.com/services/viewer/federated_f9?isVid=1" /><param name="flashvars" value="videoId=2129356155001&amp;playerID=1409164951001&amp;playerKey=AQ~~,AAAAAETmrZQ~,EVFEM4AKJdRjek0MS21pRzf_GTDAM-xj&amp;domain=embed&amp;dynamicStreaming=true" /><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="swliveconnect" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="pluginspage" value="http://www.macromedia.com/shockwave/download/index.cgi?P1_Prod_Version=ShockwaveFlash" /></object></p><p class="p1">On Wednesday, Gabrielle Giffords gave the opening statement at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on gun safety, urging lawmakers to act on gun control. The former Arizona congresswoman, who was nearly killed in a mass shooting two years ago that left six people dead and thirteen people injured, stood next to her husband Mark Kelly on Wednesday, and told the committee that while speaking is still difficult, she had something important to say:&nbsp;</p><p >Thank you for inviting me here today. This is an important conversation for our children, for our communities, for Democrats and Republicans...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/239414/watch-gabrielle-giffords-calls-for-gun-control">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Wed, 30 Jan 2013 10:50:00 -05006 fascinating things we've learned from studying apes and monkeyshttp://theweek.com/article/index/239365/6-fascinating-things-weve-learned-from-studying-apes-and-monkeyshttp://theweek.com/article/index/239365/6-fascinating-things-weve-learned-from-studying-apes-and-monkeys<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0090/45312_article_main/w/240/h/300/humans-arent-the-only-ones-who-experience-midlife-crises.jpg?209" /></P><p>A committee from the National Institutes of Health recently&nbsp;recommended that scientists retire a majority of the chimpanzees currently being used for federally-funded medical research in the United States. The recommendation comes after a groundbreaking 2011 report from the Institute of Medicine that said such research is harmful to the animals and largely unnecessary. The NIH owns roughly 360 chimps, and the report suggests all but 50 of them ought to be sent to a national sanctuary. But while animal activists are rejoicing, others wonder if the cutback will come at the cost of advances in...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/239365/6-fascinating-things-weve-learned-from-studying-apes-and-monkeys">More</a>By <a href="/author/jessica-hullinger" ><span class="byline">Jessica Hullinger</span></a>Tue, 29 Jan 2013 11:26:00 -0500