The Week: Most Recent Arts+Life Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/arts_lifeMost recent posts.en-usMon, 21 Apr 2014 03:29:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Arts+Life Posts from THE WEEKMon, 21 Apr 2014 03:29:00 -0400Mad Men recap: 'A Day's Work'http://theweek.com/article/index/260217/mad-men-recap-a-days-workhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260217/mad-men-recap-a-days-work<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59004_article_main/w/240/h/300/i-dont-know-if-its-heaven-or-hellnbspor-some-kind-of-limbo-but-i-dont-seem-to-exist.jpg?204" /></P><p>Tonight's episode of <em>Mad Men </em>offers audiences a chance to return, once again, to Don Draper playing "Don Draper" &mdash; but not immediately. Don begins the episode alone in his apartment, which gives us the chance to see what his life is like without work and Megan to occupy his time: Sleeping until 12:30 in the afternoon, throwing on a bathrobe, eating some Ritz Crackers, and watching <em>The Little Rascals</em>. It's only at the end of the day, when Dawn stops by his apartment, that Don even bothers to put on his customary suit and tie. Appearances, no matter how flimsy, must be maintained at all costs...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260217/mad-men-recap-a-days-work">More</a>By <a href="/author/scott-meslow" ><span class="byline">Scott Meslow</span></a>Mon, 21 Apr 2014 03:29:00 -0400The sexual politics of Game of Thrones just got enormously worsehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260173/the-sexual-politics-of-game-of-thrones-just-got-enormously-worsehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260173/the-sexual-politics-of-game-of-thrones-just-got-enormously-worse<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59002_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-unlikely-hero-no-morenbsp.jpg?204" /></P><p class="p1">More often than not, I like it when <em>Game of Thrones</em> changes on its way from the page to the screen. George R.R. Martin's books are immersive and sprawling, and the TV series is admirably tighter and more narrative-driven. Both are totally successful in their distinct own ways.</p><p class="p1">Several of my favorite scenes are totally original to the HBO series: Robert and Cersei's sad detente about the state of their marriage, Catelyn's dark confession to Robb's wife Talisa, or the tense mini-arc in which Arya served as cupbearer to Tywin Lannister. There have been some minor missteps along the way &mdash; but...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260173/the-sexual-politics-of-game-of-thrones-just-got-enormously-worse">More</a>By <a href="/author/scott-meslow" ><span class="byline">Scott Meslow</span></a>Sun, 20 Apr 2014 22:01:00 -0400George Saunders' 6 favorite bookshttp://theweek.com/article/index/260121/george-saunders-6-favorite-bookshttp://theweek.com/article/index/260121/george-saunders-6-favorite-books<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58971_article_main/w/240/h/300/george-saunders-is-one-of-the-most-acclaimed-short-story-writers-of-our-time.jpg?204" /></P><p><strong>In Our Time</strong> by Ernest Hemingway (Scribner, $14). Before Hemingway was a famously macho world icon, he was a magnificent 20-something prose prodigy. He does more poetic work with two- to three-sentence clusters than any writer I know. I teach <em>Indian Camp</em> as an example of constant, meaningful escalation.</p><div><p><strong>The Complete Works of Isaac Babel</strong> (Norton, $25). Babel was as laconic as Hemingway, but more lyrical. I don't know a writer who has expressed the essential strangeness of childhood better: real as a dusty couch, yet full of mythic beauty. <em>In the Basement</em> is the funniest, most uncomfortable story...</p></div> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260121/george-saunders-6-favorite-books">More</a>By The Week StaffSun, 20 Apr 2014 14:00:00 -0400The flying fire-breathing dragonhttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/260124/the-flying-fire-breathing-dragonhttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/260124/the-flying-fire-breathing-dragon<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58980_flipbook_main/w/240/h/300/this-could-be-yours-for-a-cool-60000.jpg?204" /></P><p>Hammacher Schlemmer is now selling "one of the most insane remote-controlled flying machines" ever made, said Dave LeClair at <em>Gizmag</em>. Forget about airplanes or helicopters. The Flying Fire-Breathing Dragon ($60,000) is a mechanical beast with a 9-foot wing span, and it breathes flames that travel up to 3 feet. The dragon can reach 70 mph during flights lasting a maximum of about 10 minutes. The eyes glow red while the head rotates in the direction of each turn. The turbine engine in the creature's chest runs on jet fuel or kerosene.</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/flipbook/260124/the-flying-fire-breathing-dragon">More</a>By The Week StaffSat, 19 Apr 2014 15:00:00 -0400What The Americans gets wrong about Russian spieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/259999/what-the-americans-gets-wrong-about-russian-spieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/259999/what-the-americans-gets-wrong-about-russian-spies<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58904_article_main/w/240/h/300/it-didnt-really-happen-like-this.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>The big bad bear from Moscow is back, and not just in Crimea. FX's <em>The</em><em> Americans</em>, about deep-cover KGB "illegals" living in Washington, D.C. in the early 1980s, is now midway through its second season. There's much to like about the show, from top-notch performances by Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys, to their reliance on clunky, retro-spy technology, to the clever manipulation of a common fear felt, no doubt, by most children at one point or another that their parents have secret identities (it ain't paranoia if it's true).</p><p>But I was in the intelligence business too, and a fundamental part of...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259999/what-the-americans-gets-wrong-about-russian-spies">More</a>By Aki PeritzSat, 19 Apr 2014 12:00:00 -0400How to cook like a Game of Thrones characterhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260074/how-to-cook-like-a-game-of-thrones-characterhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260074/how-to-cook-like-a-game-of-thrones-character<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58961_article_main/w/240/h/300/itll-benbspthis-good.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>We have a confession to make. For all our talk of warm-weather eating, we're about to break our cardinal food rule: forget those sunny pastas and springtime veggies &mdash; this weekend, we feast like winter is coming. Because if there's any excuse to part with your seasonal sensibility, it's the latest episode of <em>Game of Thrones</em>.</p><p>After the Red Wedding last summer, there's no telling what might happen. Invasion from the north? Revenge of the Starks? (Okay, definitely revenge.) Whatever lies ahead, you can't face it on an empty stomach, so we rounded up the essential dishes for a Westeros-worthy...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260074/how-to-cook-like-a-game-of-thrones-character">More</a>By Lisa SivaFri, 18 Apr 2014 13:00:00 -0400Your weekly streaming recommendation: The Story of Film: An Odysseyhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260170/your-weekly-streaming-recommendation-the-story-of-film-an-odysseyhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260170/your-weekly-streaming-recommendation-the-story-of-film-an-odyssey<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58989_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-story-of-film-an-odyssey.jpg?204" /></P><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/145321756%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-iqQwj&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p><p>Watch the trailer for <em>The Story of Film: An Odyssey</em>:</p><p> </p><p><iframe width="660" height="398" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/jAQNc6aQtO0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p><p><strong>Listen to more Netflix recommendations:</strong></p><ul><li>Your weekly streaming recommendation: <em>Terriers</em></li><li>Your weekly streaming recommendation: <em>A Young Doctor's Notebook</em></li><li>Your weekly streaming recommendation: <em>Double Indemnity</em></li></ul><p> </p><p ><strong>*You can also find The Week's mini podcasts on iTunes, SoundCloud, and Swell.*</strong></p><p> </p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260170/your-weekly-streaming-recommendation-the-story-of-film-an-odyssey">More</a>By <a href="/author/scott-meslow" ><span class="byline">Scott Meslow</span></a>Fri, 18 Apr 2014 11:45:00 -0400House hunting: 7 fantastic homes under $1 millionhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259669/house-hunting-7-fantastic-homes-under-1-millionhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259669/house-hunting-7-fantastic-homes-under-1-million<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58771_article_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?204" /></P><p ><br /><strong> Independence, Minn.</strong> This four-bedroom house is set on 10 wooded acres on the edge of a wetland. Interior features include hardwood floors, vaulted ceilings, an exercise room, and three fireplaces.</p><p ><br /> <br />More than 100 windows and a deck allow for expansive views of the property. $849,000. Zinn Family Realtors, Coldwell Banker Burnet, (952) 474-4444.</p><p ><br /><br /> **</p><p ><br /><br /> <br /><strong>Charles Town, W. Va.</strong> Happy Retreat, built in 1780, was once the home of Col. Charles Washington, George's younger brother. Buildings on the six-acre lot include an eight-bedroom manor house, a smokehouse, and an octagonal wooden schoolhouse. The...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259669/house-hunting-7-fantastic-homes-under-1-million">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 18 Apr 2014 11:00:00 -04005 years of Girls on Filmhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260098/5-years-of-girls-on-filmhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260098/5-years-of-girls-on-film<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58988_article_main/w/240/h/300/remember-this-delicate-petalnbsp.jpg?204" /></P><p>Five years ago, Girls on Film kicked off as a quick, biweekly column looking at Hollywood's ongoing gender problem. At the time, the topic was barely discussed outside of personal blogs and occasional statistical news pieces. Five years later, it feels like a different world &mdash; one that provides an interesting microcosm of how much things can change, and how much they stay the same.</p><p>Back when I started, Hollywood was coming off a year where men ruled the box office. 2008's highest-grossing movies were full of superheroes (<em>The Dark Knight, Iron Man, Hancock</em>), adventurous men (<em>Indiana Jones...</em></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260098/5-years-of-girls-on-film">More</a>By <a href="/author/monika-bartyzel" ><span class="byline">Monika Bartyzel</span></a>Fri, 18 Apr 2014 10:30:00 -0400The man who would save jazzhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260176/the-man-who-would-save-jazzhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260176/the-man-who-would-save-jazz<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58996_article_main/w/240/h/300/chico-had-a-way.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p><strong><em>1958</em></strong></p><p><em>Time was running out. The sun had set hours earlier, and with it any lingering goodwill the residents of Newport, Rhode Island had for the crowd in Freebody Park. It was the Fifth Annual Newport Jazz Festival, and, as would come to be the case once every summer for decades, the picturesque town was overrun with artists and fans. The police descended to try to calm the audience.</em></p><p><em>The evening lineup would feature performances by Gerry Mulligan and Dinah Washington, and next up was the Chico Hamilton Quintet. So while the noise levels were being subdued, Chico &mdash; a drummer known for his...</em></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260176/the-man-who-would-save-jazz">More</a>By Dean Bl. MyersFri, 18 Apr 2014 08:45:00 -0400