The Week: Most Recent Arts+Life Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/arts_lifeMost recent posts.en-usWed, 23 Apr 2014 08:20:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Arts+Life Posts from THE WEEKWed, 23 Apr 2014 08:20:00 -0400How to make perfect fried rice in 6 easy stepshttp://theweek.com/article/index/260316/how-to-make-perfect-fried-rice-in-6-easy-stepshttp://theweek.com/article/index/260316/how-to-make-perfect-fried-rice-in-6-easy-steps<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59057_article_main/w/240/h/300/yum.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p class="p1">Fried rice is a wildly popular takeout choice, often served with lunch specials and always ordered by a friend of mine, who shall go unnamed. But fried rice is the last thing on the menu I'd order when dining out, for one reason: It's so very simple to make at home. After a quick dig in the fridge for cooked rice, last night's leftovers, and whatever treasures lurk in back, everything comes together in less than 20 minutes.</p><p class="p1">Just about anything can go into fried rice: leftover roast chicken, grilled steak, ham, and fresh or frozen vegetables. Just don't use super "wet" leftovers, like a curry...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260316/how-to-make-perfect-fried-rice-in-6-easy-steps">More</a>By Pat TanumihardjaWed, 23 Apr 2014 08:20:00 -0400How to be a zen master at your next performance reviewhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259260/how-to-be-a-zen-master-at-your-next-performance-reviewhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259260/how-to-be-a-zen-master-at-your-next-performance-review<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58608_article_main/w/240/h/300/dont-go-on-the-defensive-and-file-away-fixes-to-implement.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p class="entry-title">Nothing can improve your performance like solid feedback can. However, none of us likes being criticized, judged, or told what to do. And our first instinct is usually to ignore feedback or even do the opposite. I never said life was simple, folks.</p><p class="entry-title">Dan Coyle, author of <em>The Talent Code</em>, and Cal Newport, author of <em>So Good They Can't Ignore You</em>, both consider feedback essential to peak performance. Merely being the kind of person who seeks out feedback is linked to many good things like higher job satisfaction and creativity. And people who specifically seek out <em>negative</em> feedback do better on performance...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259260/how-to-be-a-zen-master-at-your-next-performance-review">More</a>By Eric BarkerWed, 23 Apr 2014 07:12:00 -04007 steps to cleaning even the most cluttered closethttp://theweek.com/article/index/260248/7-steps-to-cleaning-even-the-most-cluttered-closethttp://theweek.com/article/index/260248/7-steps-to-cleaning-even-the-most-cluttered-closet<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59031_article_main/w/240/h/300/its-time-to-let-go-of-some-stuff.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>April showers bring May flowers &mdash; and plenty of rainy days spent indoors. What better way to channel your drizzly weather restlessness than to tackle some much-needed spring cleaning? After all, there's nothing like being forced to stare at your own clutter to spur you into action.</p><p>One of the toughest organizational projects is, of course, your closet. Whether you're working with a small space, funky layout or too many items you swear you'll wear <em>someday</em>, figuring out what to keep, what to toss, and what to buy more of is a challenge many would prefer to forgo altogether.<span > </span></p><p>And not only...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260248/7-steps-to-cleaning-even-the-most-cluttered-closet">More</a>By Natasha BurtonTue, 22 Apr 2014 09:00:00 -0400Why Mindy Kaling -- not Lena Dunham -- is the body positive icon of the momenthttp://theweek.com/article/index/260126/why-mindy-kaling--not-lena-dunham--is-the-body-positive-icon-of-the-momenthttp://theweek.com/article/index/260126/why-mindy-kaling--not-lena-dunham--is-the-body-positive-icon-of-the-moment<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59030_article_main/w/240/h/300/lookin-good-sister.jpg?204" /></P><p>A not-perfectly-skinny celebrity discussing her not-perfectly-skinny ways is always an occasion for much discussion, even celebration. We unfamous ladies with unfamous, and therefore probably not perfectly skinny, bodies can't help but rejoice when an entertainer who speaks about her relationship to food has a body that actually reflects it. What a marvelous break it is from the all-too-frequent size zeroes gushing about their love of hamburgers and spaghetti carbonara or how chocolate keeps them thin.</p><p>We regular women recently experienced this particular delight when not-whippet-thin Mindy Kaling...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260126/why-mindy-kaling--not-lena-dunham--is-the-body-positive-icon-of-the-moment">More</a>By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>Tue, 22 Apr 2014 08:22:00 -0400The most expensive properties in 11 special edition Monopoly gameshttp://theweek.com/article/index/260230/the-most-expensive-properties-in-11-special-edition-monopoly-gameshttp://theweek.com/article/index/260230/the-most-expensive-properties-in-11-special-edition-monopoly-games<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59011_article_main/w/240/h/300/sorry-boardwalk-youre-no-monopoly-of-valuable-property.jpg?204" /></P><p>The board spaces on the original Monopoly game were based on locations in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Through the game, the hoity-toitiest spots for property development, Boardwalk and Park Place, came to symbolize the uppermost reaches of real estate value. Since Parker Brothers (and later, Hasbro) began licensing the game for alternate versions, there have been hundreds of Monopoly offshoots and they all have to pick something to serve as their own Boardwalk and Park Place. If it's a city, they will usually correspond to the fanciest intersection. If it's a country, they'll be the two most powerful...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260230/the-most-expensive-properties-in-11-special-edition-monopoly-games">More</a>By <a href="/author/arika-okrent" ><span class="byline">Arika Okrent</span></a>Tue, 22 Apr 2014 06:18:00 -04009 ways music can improve your lifehttp://theweek.com/article/index/259153/9-ways-music-can-improve-your-lifehttp://theweek.com/article/index/259153/9-ways-music-can-improve-your-life<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58580_article_main/w/240/h/300/rock-on.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p><strong>The music you love tells me who you are</strong></p><p>Ever been a bit judgy when you hear someone's taste in music? Of course you have.</p><p>And you were right &mdash; music tells you a lot about someone's personality.</p><p>Research has learned a great deal about the power of music:</p><p>1. Your musical taste <em>does</em> accurately tell me about you, including your politics.<br />2. Your musical taste is </span>influenced by your parents<span>.<br /></span><span>3. You love your </span>favorite song<span> because it's associated with an intense emotional experience in your life.<br /></span><span>4. The music you enjoyed when you were 20 you will probably love </span>for the rest of your life<span>.<br /></span><span>5. And...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259153/9-ways-music-can-improve-your-life">More</a>By Eric BarkerMon, 21 Apr 2014 09:23:00 -0400Mad Men recap: 'A Day's Work'http://theweek.com/article/index/260217/mad-men-recap-a-days-workhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260217/mad-men-recap-a-days-work<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59004_article_main/w/240/h/300/i-dont-know-if-its-heaven-or-hellnbspor-some-kind-of-limbo-but-i-dont-seem-to-exist.jpg?204" /></P><p>Sunday's episode of <em>Mad Men </em>offers audiences a chance to return, once again, to Don Draper playing "Don Draper" &mdash; but not immediately. Don begins the episode alone in his apartment, which gives us the chance to see what his life is like without work and Megan to occupy his time: Sleeping until 12:30 in the afternoon, throwing on a bathrobe, eating some Ritz Crackers, and watching <em>The Little Rascals</em>. It's only at the end of the day, when Dawn stops by his apartment, that Don even bothers to put on his customary suit and tie. Appearances, no matter how flimsy, must be maintained at all costs...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260217/mad-men-recap-a-days-work">More</a>By <a href="/author/scott-meslow" ><span class="byline">Scott Meslow</span></a>Mon, 21 Apr 2014 03:29:00 -0400The sexual politics of Game of Thrones just got enormously worsehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260173/the-sexual-politics-of-game-of-thrones-just-got-enormously-worsehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260173/the-sexual-politics-of-game-of-thrones-just-got-enormously-worse<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59002_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-unlikely-hero-no-morenbsp.jpg?204" /></P><p class="p1">More often than not, I like it when <em>Game of Thrones</em> changes on its way from the page to the screen. George R.R. Martin's books are immersive and sprawling, and the TV series is admirably tighter and more narrative-driven. Both are totally successful in their distinct own ways.</p><p class="p1">Several of my favorite scenes are totally original to the HBO series: Robert and Cersei's sad detente about the state of their marriage, Catelyn's dark confession to Robb's wife Talisa, or the tense mini-arc in which Arya served as cupbearer to Tywin Lannister. There have been some minor missteps along the way &mdash; but...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260173/the-sexual-politics-of-game-of-thrones-just-got-enormously-worse">More</a>By <a href="/author/scott-meslow" ><span class="byline">Scott Meslow</span></a>Sun, 20 Apr 2014 22:01:00 -0400George Saunders' 6 favorite bookshttp://theweek.com/article/index/260121/george-saunders-6-favorite-bookshttp://theweek.com/article/index/260121/george-saunders-6-favorite-books<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58971_article_main/w/240/h/300/george-saunders-is-one-of-the-most-acclaimed-short-story-writers-of-our-time.jpg?204" /></P><p><strong>In Our Time</strong> by Ernest Hemingway (Scribner, $14). Before Hemingway was a famously macho world icon, he was a magnificent 20-something prose prodigy. He does more poetic work with two- to three-sentence clusters than any writer I know. I teach <em>Indian Camp</em> as an example of constant, meaningful escalation.</p><div><p><strong>The Complete Works of Isaac Babel</strong> (Norton, $25). Babel was as laconic as Hemingway, but more lyrical. I don't know a writer who has expressed the essential strangeness of childhood better: real as a dusty couch, yet full of mythic beauty. <em>In the Basement</em> is the funniest, most uncomfortable story...</p></div> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260121/george-saunders-6-favorite-books">More</a>By The Week StaffSun, 20 Apr 2014 14:00:00 -0400The flying fire-breathing dragonhttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/260124/the-flying-fire-breathing-dragonhttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/260124/the-flying-fire-breathing-dragon<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58980_flipbook_main/w/240/h/300/this-could-be-yours-for-a-cool-60000.jpg?204" /></P><p>Hammacher Schlemmer is now selling "one of the most insane remote-controlled flying machines" ever made, said Dave LeClair at <em>Gizmag</em>. Forget about airplanes or helicopters. The Flying Fire-Breathing Dragon ($60,000) is a mechanical beast with a 9-foot wing span, and it breathes flames that travel up to 3 feet. The dragon can reach 70 mph during flights lasting a maximum of about 10 minutes. The eyes glow red while the head rotates in the direction of each turn. The turbine engine in the creature's chest runs on jet fuel or kerosene.</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/flipbook/260124/the-flying-fire-breathing-dragon">More</a>By The Week StaffSat, 19 Apr 2014 15:00:00 -0400