The Week: Most Recent Business Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/businessMost recent posts.en-usSat, 19 Apr 2014 14:00:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Business Posts from THE WEEKSat, 19 Apr 2014 14:00:00 -0400Entrepreneurs: A dying breed?http://theweek.com/article/index/260085/entrepreneurs-a-dying-breedhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260085/entrepreneurs-a-dying-breed<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58942_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-rate-of-survival-for-fledgling-companies-has-been-steadily-decliningnbsp.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Building and running your own business is, for many people, part of the American Dream. But new research from the Kauffman Foundation indicates that business creation declined in 2013.</p><p>That's not necessarily a bad thing. In recent years, many people who started their own businesses did so out of necessity because they were unable to find other work due to the recession.</p><p>Last year, 280 out of 100,000 adults started businesses, compared to 300 out of 100,00 in 2012. Unemployment is at its lowest level in years, and people are more likely to seek work at an existing company rather than striking...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260085/entrepreneurs-a-dying-breed">More</a>By LearnVestSat, 19 Apr 2014 14:00:00 -0400How women are being punished for living longerhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259877/how-women-are-being-punished-for-living-longerhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259877/how-women-are-being-punished-for-living-longer<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58846_article_main/w/240/h/300/to-ensure-care-and-retirement-expenses-are-met-women-especially-need-to-play-their-cards-right.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Here's some good news: Women are living longer than ever. The bad news? They're paying a hefty price for it.</p><p>Nearly 70 percent of Americans ages 65 or older are expected to need long-term care &mdash; either at home or in a facility &mdash; at some point in their lives. But whether seniors need help recovering from surgery or a stroke &mdash; or simply require assistance with daily tasks like bathing and dressing as they age &mdash; the cost of such long-term care can be staggeringly expensive.</p><p>In 2013, the median cost of a private room in a nursing home for just one year came in at $83,950...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259877/how-women-are-being-punished-for-living-longer">More</a>By Carolyn O'HaraFri, 18 Apr 2014 12:00:00 -0400Janet Yellen's 3 questions for the economyhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260086/janet-yellens-3-questions-for-the-economyhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260086/janet-yellens-3-questions-for-the-economy<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58940_article_main/w/240/h/300/yellen-is-staying-flexible.jpg?204" /></P><p class="p1"><span class="s1">Today, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen delivered a speech on the economy and monetary policy at the <span class="s2">Economic Club of New York, offering </span>attendees a chance to quiz the first female Fed chair on the state of the economy and what the central bank will do next.</span></p><p class="p1"><span class="s1">In late <span class="s2">March</span>, Yellen said the Fed could begin to raise interest rates within six months of ending its quantitative easing program, which has seen the Fed buy billions of dollars worth of bonds and other assets to lower lending costs. However, today Yellen erased any concerns of a specific timetable for raising interest rates, saying policy...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260086/janet-yellens-3-questions-for-the-economy">More</a>By <a href="/author/john-aziz" ><span class="byline">John Aziz</span></a>Wed, 16 Apr 2014 16:59:00 -0400U.S. economic confidence remains depressed -- but there's hopehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260050/us-economic-confidence-remains-depressed--but-theres-hopehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260050/us-economic-confidence-remains-depressed--but-theres-hope<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58918_article_main/w/240/h/300/we-could-all-use-a-little-pick-me-up.jpg?204" /></P><p>Gallup's latest economic confidence poll is out and it's still stuck in the red, down at -16 for both outlook and current conditions:</p><p><br /></p><p >[Gallup]</p><p >That's better than the collapse down to -39 recorded during the government shutdown in October.</p><p >The harsh truth, looking backward, is that economic confidence has stayed in negative territory now for almost the entirety of the past six years:</p><p><br /></p><p >[Gallup]</p><p >While the overall trend line looks to be moving in the right direction, why hasn't confidence hit positive territory yet? It's not high taxes &mdash; taxes under Obama are lower than they were under...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260050/us-economic-confidence-remains-depressed--but-theres-hope">More</a>By <a href="/author/john-aziz" ><span class="byline">John Aziz</span></a>Wed, 16 Apr 2014 11:51:00 -0400Should drug deals and prostitution be included in GDP?http://theweek.com/article/index/260002/should-drug-deals-and-prostitution-be-included-in-gdphttp://theweek.com/article/index/260002/should-drug-deals-and-prostitution-be-included-in-gdp<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58903_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-shady-lady-ranch-mdash-nevadas-friendliest-brothel-mdash-could-give-the-economy-a-real-cough.jpg?204" /></P><p class="p1"><span class="s1">Britain will see a boost in measured economic activity later this year when activities previously never measured &mdash; specifically, drug dealing and prostitution &mdash; are incorporated into the measure.</span></p><p class="p1"><span class="s1">Britain is making the change to fall into line with its European neighbors. In the Netherlands, for example, some drugs like marijuana are decriminalized and prostitution is legal and regulated. The European Union wants all countries to include the same activities in the measure, so that GDP numbers for different countries are fairer comparisons.</span></p><p class="p1"><span class="s1">At first the changes will only include U.K...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260002/should-drug-deals-and-prostitution-be-included-in-gdp">More</a>By <a href="/author/john-aziz" ><span class="byline">John Aziz</span></a>Tue, 15 Apr 2014 12:13:00 -0400Don't fret the falling tech stockshttp://theweek.com/article/index/259973/dont-fret-the-falling-tech-stockshttp://theweek.com/article/index/259973/dont-fret-the-falling-tech-stocks<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58885_article_main/w/240/h/300/breathe.jpg?204" /></P><p class="p1"><span class="s1">After climbing 244 percent from its 2009 low, the NASDAQ has dropped over 8 percent. It even fell 3.1 percent last Thursday alone, its largest single day drop since November 2011:</span></p><p ><br />(<em>Bloomberg</em>)</p><p class="p1"><span class="s1">And while the dip since March looks pretty small in the broader context of the last five years, certain slices of the tech market have fallen more heavily.</span></p><p class="p1"><span class="s2">Notable tech stocks</span><span class="s1"> like Facebook and Twitter have sunk 18 percent and 26 percent, respectively, since March. King &mdash; the maker of <em>Candy Crush Saga &mdash; </em>is trading for $16.96, far below the $22.50 investors paid for it during its IPO in March...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259973/dont-fret-the-falling-tech-stocks">More</a>By <a href="/author/john-aziz" ><span class="byline">John Aziz</span></a>Tue, 15 Apr 2014 09:48:00 -0400I'm retiring in my early '30shttp://theweek.com/article/index/259878/im-retiring-in-my-early-30shttp://theweek.com/article/index/259878/im-retiring-in-my-early-30s<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58848_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-futures-looking-bright-mdash-and-a-lot-less-work-oriented.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Later this year, at the age of 32, I plan to quit my full-time job as a software developer and don't intend to look for another one.</p><p>By then, I expect my portfolio will be large enough to fund my essential expenses for at least the next 30 years, if not indefinitely, so that getting another 9-to-5 job becomes an option rather than a necessity.</p><p>You may wonder if I have some magic ability for picking Powerball numbers, or if I was born with a silver spoon in my mouth. Neither is the case. I've built my nest egg simply by watching my spending and investing as much of my paycheck as I can. I am...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259878/im-retiring-in-my-early-30s">More</a>By Brandon Sutherland*Tue, 15 Apr 2014 07:00:00 -0400Yes, the economy is endangering Family Dollar -- just not in the way you thinkhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259919/yes-the-economy-is-endangering-family-dollar--just-not-in-the-way-you-thinkhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259919/yes-the-economy-is-endangering-family-dollar--just-not-in-the-way-you-think<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58860_article_main/w/240/h/300/some-dollars-stores-are-getting-the-bootnbsp.jpg?204" /></P><p class="p1"><span class="s1">In the wake of the 2008 recession, dollar stores such as Dollar Tree, Dollar General, and Family Dollar &mdash; which sell a wide selection of different goods, from food and household goods to clothing &mdash; exploded throughout America, drawing in new customers hit by the weak recovery, or just looking for a bargain. Over the past five years, the big three dollar chains added 5,700 new stores:</span><span > </span></p><p><br /></p><p class="p2" ><span class="s1">[<em><span class="s2">Businessweek</span></em>]</span></p><p class="p1"><span class="s1">But discount retailers got a shock last week when Family Dollar issued a <span class="s2">dismal earnings report</span> and announced <span class="s2">plans to close 370 stores</span>, roughly 5 percent of its locations.</span></p><p class="p1"><span class="s1">The company...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259919/yes-the-economy-is-endangering-family-dollar--just-not-in-the-way-you-think">More</a>By <a href="/author/john-aziz" ><span class="byline">John Aziz</span></a>Mon, 14 Apr 2014 11:35:00 -0400Personal finance tips: When to skimp on insurance, and morehttp://theweek.com/article/index/259818/personal-finance-tips-when-to-skimp-on-insurance-and-morehttp://theweek.com/article/index/259818/personal-finance-tips-when-to-skimp-on-insurance-and-more<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58812_article_main/w/240/h/300/keep-track-of-that-cash.jpg?204" /></P><p class="p1"><span class="s1"><strong> Insurance you don't need<br /></strong></span>Sometimes it makes sense to skimp on insurance, said Aaron Crowe at<em> Daily Finance</em>. "You could almost insure every step you take in life," but that doesn't mean you should. Getting life or health insurance is a no-brainer. But in other cases, it might make more sense to start an emergency fund instead. Buying rental car insurance from the rental agency is often redundant &mdash; and expensive &mdash; since your credit card or auto insurance may cover you anyway. And speaking of cars, if you're all paid up on an old car, skip the collision insurance. "If a car is totaled...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259818/personal-finance-tips-when-to-skimp-on-insurance-and-more">More</a>By <a href="/author/sergio-hernandez" ><span class="byline">Sergio Hernandez</span></a>Mon, 14 Apr 2014 09:15:00 -04007 ways to quickly become a master at anythinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/259363/7-ways-to-quickly-become-a-master-at-anythinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/259363/7-ways-to-quickly-become-a-master-at-anything<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58644_article_main/w/240/h/300/yeah-buddy-get-ready-for-success.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p><strong>There's a right way to learn</strong></p><p>Want to be more successful? Actually, that's not ambitious enough &mdash; want to be the best?</p><p>I do. So I called my friend Daniel Coyle, author of the best books on getting better at anything: <em>The Talent Code</em> and <em>The Little Book of Talent</em>.</p><p>Dan knows that the "10,000 hour rule" is nice, but you need to align your effort with the way your brain was designed to learn.</p><p>Hours are vital but you can get to mastery faster &mdash; <em>much</em> faster &mdash; by practicing the right way.</p><p>So how can you and I do that? Here are seven steps experts use:</p><p> </p><p><strong>1) Be uncomfortable</strong></p>... <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259363/7-ways-to-quickly-become-a-master-at-anything">More</a>By Eric BarkerMon, 14 Apr 2014 09:12:00 -0400