The Week: Most Recent Business Postshttps://theweek.com/section/index/businessMost recent posts.en-usWed, 23 Apr 2014 06:27:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Business Posts from THE WEEKWed, 23 Apr 2014 06:27:00 -0400Why the poor's investment of choice is so alarminghttp://theweek.com/article/index/260333/why-the-poors-investment-of-choice-is-so-alarminghttp://theweek.com/article/index/260333/why-the-poors-investment-of-choice-is-so-alarming<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59072_article_main/w/240/h/300/youll-need-more-than-this-to-retire.jpg?204" /></P><p class="p1"><span class="s1">Gallup's poll</span><span class="s2"> on Americans' favorite investments always makes fascinating reading. </span></p><p class="p1"><span class="s2">Every year, Gallup asks Americans to choose the best investment from the following choices: Real estate, stocks and mutual funds, gold, savings accounts and certificates of deposit, or bonds. </span>In the years since the 2008 financial crisis and housing bust &mdash; after which Americans as a group briefly ranked gold as their favorite investment &mdash; real estate has once again swung back into favor:</p><p class="p2"><br /></p><p ><span class="s2">[Gallup]</span></p><p class="p2">But <span class="s1">as Barry Ritholtz</span> notes over at <em>Bloomberg View</em>, the most interesting thing is that there are some...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260333/why-the-poors-investment-of-choice-is-so-alarming">More</a>By <a href="/author/john-aziz" ><span class="byline">John Aziz</span></a>Wed, 23 Apr 2014 06:27:00 -0400General Mills backed down from its controversial lawsuit policy. But the problem isn't over.http://theweek.com/article/index/260286/general-mills-backed-down-from-its-controversial-lawsuit-policy-but-the-problem-isnt-overhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260286/general-mills-backed-down-from-its-controversial-lawsuit-policy-but-the-problem-isnt-over<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59037_article_main/w/240/h/300/those-following-in-erin-brokovichs-class-action-footsteps-need-to-read-the-fine-print.jpg?204" /></P><p class="p1"><span class="s1">Class action lawsuits are an efficient way for wronged individuals &mdash; who may lack funds and legal expertise &mdash; to fight back against the powerful legal muscle of big business. One very famous example is the case of Erin Brockovich, <span class="s2">who built a class action lawsuit that successfully sued Pacific Gas and Electric over contamination of drinking water</span>.</span></p><p class="p1"><span class="s1">A lone consumer wronged by a large corporation might struggle to foot the bill to hire the legal firepower necessary to win their case in court. But <span class="s2">hundreds or thousands of consumers</span> claiming similar injuries or damages from the same company...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260286/general-mills-backed-down-from-its-controversial-lawsuit-policy-but-the-problem-isnt-over">More</a>By <a href="/author/john-aziz" ><span class="byline">John Aziz</span></a>Tue, 22 Apr 2014 11:40:00 -0400The 8 traits of every fearless job hunterhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260165/the-8-traits-of-every-fearless-job-hunterhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260165/the-8-traits-of-every-fearless-job-hunter<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59010_article_main/w/240/h/300/you-too-can-be-a-super-job-hunter.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Why is it that some people just seem to effortlessly climb the career ladder? You know these folks we speak of: They always know how to dazzle during an interview, and they have a knack for nabbing that prime position before it's even posted.</p><p>What's their secret?</p><p>According to the authors of <em>Fearless Job Hunting: Powerful Psychological Strategies for Getting the Job You Want</em>, these are people who have mastered the job hunt by not only honing their skills but also building up the psychological know-how to get through a sometimes soul-crushing process.</p><p>We tapped two of the book's coauthors &mdash...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260165/the-8-traits-of-every-fearless-job-hunter">More</a>By Jane BianchiMon, 21 Apr 2014 09:54:00 -0400Personal finance tips: The safest way to pay, and morehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260125/personal-finance-tips-the-safest-way-to-pay-and-morehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260125/personal-finance-tips-the-safest-way-to-pay-and-more<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58979_article_main/w/240/h/300/if-you-cant-pay-in-cash-opt-for-credit-over-debit.jpg?204" /></P><p><strong> Making salaries transparent<br /></strong>It's time to break the salary taboo, said Claire Zillman at CNN. "Very few of us gab about how much money we earn with co-workers," and about half of all workers say "discussion of wage and salary information is discouraged or prohibited by their employers or could lead to punishment." But "salary transparency gives workers ammo to advocate for themselves" during pay negotiations and helps workers know whether they are underpaid. It can also "work to a company's benefit," because it encourages lower-paid workers to "strive to be more productive." Plus, businesses are...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260125/personal-finance-tips-the-safest-way-to-pay-and-more">More</a>By <a href="/author/sergio-hernandez" ><span class="byline">Sergio Hernandez</span></a>Mon, 21 Apr 2014 06:13:00 -0400Matt Taibbi on vampire squid, journalistic outrage, and Obama's flaccid approach to financial crimehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260114/matt-taibbi-on-vampire-squid-journalistic-outrage-and-obamas-flaccid-approach-to-financial-crimehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260114/matt-taibbi-on-vampire-squid-journalistic-outrage-and-obamas-flaccid-approach-to-financial-crime<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58994_article_main/w/240/h/300/bernie-madoff-is-one-of-the-few-to-be-prosecutednbsp.jpg?204" /></P><p>Matt Taibbi is still fuming about the "vampire squid" of high finance.</p><p>The <em>Rolling Stone </em>reporter who famously tagged Goldman Sachs as "a great vampire squid, wrapped around the face of humanity" &mdash; a phrase that is now so embedded in the cultural lexicon that he wonders if it will be on his gravestone &mdash; is well-known for his polemics against banks and Wall Street's bad actors. For his new book, <em>The Divide</em>, he decided to carry that journalistic interest to its logical extension.</p><p>Taibbi's book is about the wealth gap in the U.S., the people who play fast and loose with the rules &mdash...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260114/matt-taibbi-on-vampire-squid-journalistic-outrage-and-obamas-flaccid-approach-to-financial-crime">More</a>By Andy MeekMon, 21 Apr 2014 06:10:00 -0400Entrepreneurs: A dying breed?http://theweek.com/article/index/260085/entrepreneurs-a-dying-breedhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260085/entrepreneurs-a-dying-breed<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58942_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-rate-of-survival-for-fledgling-companies-has-been-steadily-decliningnbsp.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Building and running your own business is, for many people, part of the American Dream. But new research from the Kauffman Foundation indicates that business creation declined in 2013.</p><p>That's not necessarily a bad thing. In recent years, many people who started their own businesses did so out of necessity because they were unable to find other work due to the recession.</p><p>Last year, 280 out of 100,000 adults started businesses, compared to 300 out of 100,00 in 2012. Unemployment is at its lowest level in years, and people are more likely to seek work at an existing company rather than striking...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260085/entrepreneurs-a-dying-breed">More</a>By LearnVestSat, 19 Apr 2014 14:00:00 -0400How women are being punished for living longerhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259877/how-women-are-being-punished-for-living-longerhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259877/how-women-are-being-punished-for-living-longer<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58846_article_main/w/240/h/300/to-ensure-care-and-retirement-expenses-are-met-women-especially-need-to-play-their-cards-right.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Here's some good news: Women are living longer than ever. The bad news? They're paying a hefty price for it.</p><p>Nearly 70 percent of Americans ages 65 or older are expected to need long-term care &mdash; either at home or in a facility &mdash; at some point in their lives. But whether seniors need help recovering from surgery or a stroke &mdash; or simply require assistance with daily tasks like bathing and dressing as they age &mdash; the cost of such long-term care can be staggeringly expensive.</p><p>In 2013, the median cost of a private room in a nursing home for just one year came in at $83,950...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259877/how-women-are-being-punished-for-living-longer">More</a>By Carolyn O'HaraFri, 18 Apr 2014 12:00:00 -0400Janet Yellen's 3 questions for the economyhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260086/janet-yellens-3-questions-for-the-economyhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260086/janet-yellens-3-questions-for-the-economy<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58940_article_main/w/240/h/300/yellen-is-staying-flexible.jpg?204" /></P><p class="p1"><span class="s1">Today, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen delivered a speech on the economy and monetary policy at the <span class="s2">Economic Club of New York, offering </span>attendees a chance to quiz the first female Fed chair on the state of the economy and what the central bank will do next.</span></p><p class="p1"><span class="s1">In late <span class="s2">March</span>, Yellen said the Fed could begin to raise interest rates within six months of ending its quantitative easing program, which has seen the Fed buy billions of dollars worth of bonds and other assets to lower lending costs. However, today Yellen erased any concerns of a specific timetable for raising interest rates, saying policy...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260086/janet-yellens-3-questions-for-the-economy">More</a>By <a href="/author/john-aziz" ><span class="byline">John Aziz</span></a>Wed, 16 Apr 2014 16:59:00 -0400U.S. economic confidence remains depressed -- but there's hopehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260050/us-economic-confidence-remains-depressed--but-theres-hopehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260050/us-economic-confidence-remains-depressed--but-theres-hope<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58918_article_main/w/240/h/300/we-could-all-use-a-little-pick-me-up.jpg?204" /></P><p>Gallup's latest economic confidence poll is out and it's still stuck in the red, down at -16 for both outlook and current conditions:</p><p><br /></p><p >[Gallup]</p><p >That's better than the collapse down to -39 recorded during the government shutdown in October.</p><p >The harsh truth, looking backward, is that economic confidence has stayed in negative territory now for almost the entirety of the past six years:</p><p><br /></p><p >[Gallup]</p><p >While the overall trend line looks to be moving in the right direction, why hasn't confidence hit positive territory yet? It's not high taxes &mdash; taxes under Obama are lower than they were under...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260050/us-economic-confidence-remains-depressed--but-theres-hope">More</a>By <a href="/author/john-aziz" ><span class="byline">John Aziz</span></a>Wed, 16 Apr 2014 11:51:00 -0400Should drug deals and prostitution be included in GDP?http://theweek.com/article/index/260002/should-drug-deals-and-prostitution-be-included-in-gdphttp://theweek.com/article/index/260002/should-drug-deals-and-prostitution-be-included-in-gdp<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58903_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-shady-lady-ranch-mdash-nevadas-friendliest-brothel-mdash-could-give-the-economy-a-real-cough.jpg?204" /></P><p class="p1"><span class="s1">Britain will see a boost in measured economic activity later this year when activities previously never measured &mdash; specifically, drug dealing and prostitution &mdash; are incorporated into the measure.</span></p><p class="p1"><span class="s1">Britain is making the change to fall into line with its European neighbors. In the Netherlands, for example, some drugs like marijuana are decriminalized and prostitution is legal and regulated. The European Union wants all countries to include the same activities in the measure, so that GDP numbers for different countries are fairer comparisons.</span></p><p class="p1"><span class="s1">At first the changes will only include U.K...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260002/should-drug-deals-and-prostitution-be-included-in-gdp">More</a>By <a href="/author/john-aziz" ><span class="byline">John Aziz</span></a>Tue, 15 Apr 2014 12:13:00 -0400