The Week: Most Recent Entertainment Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/entertainmentMost recent posts.en-usSun, 20 Jul 2014 14:00:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Entertainment Posts from THE WEEKSun, 20 Jul 2014 14:00:00 -0400Dean Koontz's 5 favorite bookshttp://theweek.com/article/index/264846/dean-koontzs-5-favorite-bookshttp://theweek.com/article/index/264846/dean-koontzs-5-favorite-books<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61211_article_main/w/240/h/300/koontzs-new-novel-takes-place-in-new-york-city.jpg?206" /></P><p class="p1"><strong><span class="s1"> In Sunlight and in Shadow </span></strong><span class="s2">by Mark Helprin (Mariner, $16). Mark Helprin's <em>Winter's Tale</em> weaves historical realities of New York City with the fantastic to profound effect, but this 1940s love story also enchants. The magic here is the intensity of Harry's love for Catherine, the purity of his code of honor. The title is from Poe's poem "Eldorado," about a gallant knight. Helprin convinces that honor in the service of love triumphs even when it appears to fail by mortal standards.</span></p><p class="p1"><span class="s1"><strong>The Museum of Extraordinary Things</strong> by Alice Hoffman (Scribner, $28). This tale of early-20th-century New York City...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/264846/dean-koontzs-5-favorite-books">More</a>By The Week StaffSun, 20 Jul 2014 14:00:00 -0400By whom the bells tollhttp://theweek.com/article/index/264598/by-whom-the-bells-tollhttp://theweek.com/article/index/264598/by-whom-the-bells-toll<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61091_article_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?206" /></P><p><br /></p><p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/63772879" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p><p class="TextBlock" data-role="paragraph" data-type="text" data-align="left" data-effect="dropcaps">Born in Manhattan on February 10, 1931, Dionisio Lind has been The Riverside Church's main <em>carillonneur</em> since 2000. Carillons originated in the European "low countries" in the 16th century, and according to the World Carillon Federation, they must have at least 23 bronze bells and must form a fully chromatic scale. The carillonneur plays on a keyboard using his or her fists to play the keys, known as batons, and stepping on a pedal keyboard.</p><p class="TextBlock" data-role="paragraph" data-type="text" data-align="left" data-effect="dropcaps">(<strong>More from <em>Narratively</em></strong>: The chimemasters society)</p><p class="TextBlock" data-role="paragraph" data-type="text" data-align="left">Having grown up playing piano and listening to jazz and gospel, Lind first learned to play the carillon...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/264598/by-whom-the-bells-toll">More</a>By Emon HassanSun, 20 Jul 2014 12:00:00 -0400Your weekly streaming recommendation: Dreddhttp://theweek.com/article/index/264924/your-weekly-streaming-recommendation-dreddhttp://theweek.com/article/index/264924/your-weekly-streaming-recommendation-dredd<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61300_article_main/w/240/h/300/dredd.jpg?206" /></P><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/159283636%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-d6Xdh&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p><p>Watch the trailer for <em>Dredd:</em></p><p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/PifvRiHVSCY?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p><p>Watch <em>Dredd</em> on Amazon Instant Video</p><p>Watch <em>Dredd</em> on Netflix</p><p> </p><p><strong>Listen to more streaming recommendations:</strong></p><ul><li>Your weekly streaming recommendation: <em>Headhunters</em></li><li>Your weekly streaming recommendation: <em>The Station Agent</em></li><li>Your weekly streaming recommendation: <em>The War Room</em></li></ul><p> </p><p ><strong>*You can also find The Week's mini podcasts on iTunes, SoundCloud, Swell, and TuneIn.*</strong></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/264924/your-weekly-streaming-recommendation-dredd">More</a>By <a href="/author/scott-meslow" ><span class="byline">Scott Meslow</span></a>Fri, 18 Jul 2014 14:53:00 -0400Girls on Film: Forget When Harry Met Sally. Men and women can be friends.http://theweek.com/article/index/264862/girls-on-film-forget-when-harry-met-sally-men-and-women-can-be-friendshttp://theweek.com/article/index/264862/girls-on-film-forget-when-harry-met-sally-men-and-women-can-be-friends<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61230_article_main/w/240/h/300/thanks-a-lot-ephron.jpg?206" /></P><p>When Harry met Sally 25 years ago this week, America fell in love with Nora Ephron. Through her legendary rom-com triumvirate &mdash; <em>When Harry Met Sally, Sleepless in Seattle,</em> and <em>You've Got Mail &mdash; </em>Ephron set the blueprint for modern cinematic romance. Hollywood has since followed her formula &mdash; essentially boy meets girl, they spar, then fall in love &mdash; so loyally that even <em>They Came Together</em>, which purported to satirize the entire genre, is almost exclusively a satire of her work.</p><p>For years, the Ephron formula was one of Hollywood's biggest moneymakers, until superheroes and...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/264862/girls-on-film-forget-when-harry-met-sally-men-and-women-can-be-friends">More</a>By <a href="/author/monika-bartyzel" ><span class="byline">Monika Bartyzel</span></a>Fri, 18 Jul 2014 09:00:00 -0400Boyhood is the culmination of Richard Linklater's fascinating, career-long obsession with timehttp://theweek.com/article/index/264947/boyhood-is-the-culmination-of-richard-linklaters-fascinating-career-long-obsession-with-timehttp://theweek.com/article/index/264947/boyhood-is-the-culmination-of-richard-linklaters-fascinating-career-long-obsession-with-time<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61261_article_main/w/240/h/300/one-small-moment-in-a-movie-that-spans-years.jpg?206" /></P><p class="p1"><em>Boyhood</em>, the new film from Richard Linklater, is about one boy's evolution to young adulthood. The film follows Mason Jr., played by Ellar Coltrane, and his family as they grow and change over the course of 12 years. But the real star of the movie is time itself; shot in installments over those 12 years, <em>Boyhood</em> captures Coltrane's actual development into a man, a feat of cinematic realism that has earned the film a 99 percent rating on <em>Rotten Tomatoes</em>.</p><p class="p1">Time is a subject that Linklater is all too familiar with, and his fascination can be traced from the very beginning of his 30-year career. In...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/264947/boyhood-is-the-culmination-of-richard-linklaters-fascinating-career-long-obsession-with-time">More</a>By <a href="/author/matt-cohen" ><span class="byline">Matt Cohen</span></a>Fri, 18 Jul 2014 06:02:00 -0400What if The Purge was real?http://theweek.com/article/index/264916/what-if-the-purge-was-realhttp://theweek.com/article/index/264916/what-if-the-purge-was-real<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61249_article_main/w/240/h/300/whos-ready-to-pillage-murder-and-burn.jpg?206" /></P><p ><em> "The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice." &mdash;</em>Martin Luther King, Jr.</p><p ><em>"We are inherently a violent species. War, genocide, murder. The denial of our true selves is the problem." &mdash;</em><em>The Purge</em></p><p class="p1">For all the flaws of last year's surprisingly successful dystopian thriller <em>The Purge</em>, it did mirror reality in one significant way: just as its characters are subjected to an annual Purge, America will now be subjected to an annual installment in the<em> Purge</em> franchise. Tomorrow sees the release of <em>The Purge: Anarchy</em>, and if it's even moderately successful, it will pave the...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/264916/what-if-the-purge-was-real">More</a>By <a href="/author/scott-meslow" ><span class="byline">Scott Meslow</span></a>Thu, 17 Jul 2014 13:24:00 -0400This is the most influential American comedian you've never heard ofhttp://theweek.com/article/index/264786/this-is-the-most-influential-american-comedian-youve-never-heard-ofhttp://theweek.com/article/index/264786/this-is-the-most-influential-american-comedian-youve-never-heard-of<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61185_article_main/w/240/h/300/any-guesses-anyone.jpg?206" /></P><p>Imagine a quiet, unassuming, rather short man who:</p><p>-- was already considered a legendary standup in the 1960s;</p><p>-- was responsible for getting the Smothers Brothers kicked off the air at CBS;</p><p>-- made Richard Nixon's enemies list, becoming the only comedian to do so ("In America, anyone can become President. I think we bend over backwards to prove it.");</p><p>-- logged more Tonight Show appearances than any other entertainer, save for Bob Hope;</p><p>-- hosted the Tonight Show when he was 26;</p><p>-- had a mobster for a best friend;</p><p>-- directed hundreds of television commercials;</p><p>-- whose imprint on TV comedies...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/264786/this-is-the-most-influential-american-comedian-youve-never-heard-of">More</a>Marc AmbinderWed, 16 Jul 2014 12:35:00 -0400Grouplove's 6 favorite songs for the open roadhttp://theweek.com/article/index/264771/grouploves-6-favorite-songs-for-the-open-roadhttp://theweek.com/article/index/264771/grouploves-6-favorite-songs-for-the-open-road<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61189_article_main/w/240/h/300/get-ready-to-sing-along.jpg?206" /></P><p>The music of the eclectic Los Angeles-based band Grouplove is rife with soaring harmonies, catchy melodies, and a youthful attitude. The indie pop quintet's sophomore album, <em>Spreading Rumours</em>, sees the band maximizing their crossover potential &mdash; you can practically hear the festival crowds singing along to their anthemic choruses. As the band gets ready to head out on yet another tour, <em>The Week</em> spoke to Christian Zucconi (vocals/guitar), Hannah Hooper (vocals/keys), Ryan Rabin (drums), Andrew Wessen (guitar/vocals), and Dan Gleason (bass) about everything from dreamy grooves to riffs that...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/264771/grouploves-6-favorite-songs-for-the-open-road">More</a>By <a href="/author/samantha-rollins" ><span class="byline">Samantha Rollins</span></a>Wed, 16 Jul 2014 10:02:00 -0400The shameful secret behind the popularity of spy movieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/264767/the-shameful-secret-behind-the-popularity-of-spy-movieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/264767/the-shameful-secret-behind-the-popularity-of-spy-movies<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61166_article_main/w/240/h/300/this-is-not-real.jpg?206" /></P><p>Moviegoers love spies. James Bond is probably the most successful franchise in history. And when you consider all the spinoffs, descendants, books, television shows, and media-spanning imitators, it's probably fair to say that spying is one of the top two or three subjects of popular media in America, along with superheroes and light sabers.</p><p>Most spy fiction portrays spies as noble and almost superhumanly skilled, both physically and intellectually. James Bond is always a master at whatever the screenwriters can dream up, up to and including sword-fighting with a half-dozen different kinds of...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/264767/the-shameful-secret-behind-the-popularity-of-spy-movies">More</a>By <a href="/author/ryan-cooper" ><span class="byline">Ryan Cooper</span></a>Wed, 16 Jul 2014 06:32:00 -0400Emily Gould's 6 favorite bookshttp://theweek.com/article/index/264460/emily-goulds-6-favorite-bookshttp://theweek.com/article/index/264460/emily-goulds-6-favorite-books<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61005_article_main/w/240/h/300/already-with-a-memoir-to-her-name-gould-next-tackles-friendship.jpg?206" /></P><p><strong> Lee and Elaine</strong> by Ann Rower (Serpent's Tail, $14). An art professor ends a long relationship and retreats to a friend's beach house, where she obsesses over the legacies of Willem de Kooning's and Jackson Pollock's wives. Rower's wide-ranging imagination and translucent, funny, and intelligent style transforms ordinary life into a series of surprises.</p><p class="p1"><span class="s1"><strong>Walking Through Clear Water in a Pool Painted Black</strong> by Cookie Mueller (Semiotext(e), $13). The late actress Cookie Mueller, best known for appearing in John Waters movies and Nan Goldin photographs, was also a naturally masterful storyteller. In...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/264460/emily-goulds-6-favorite-books">More</a>By The Week StaffSun, 13 Jul 2014 14:00:00 -0400