The Week: Most Recent Lifestyle Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/lifestyleMost recent posts.en-usSun, 23 Nov 2014 12:00:00 -0500http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Lifestyle Posts from THE WEEKSun, 23 Nov 2014 12:00:00 -0500House hunting: 7 stunning castles in Europehttp://theweek.com/article/index/272300/house-hunting-7-stunning-castles-in-europehttp://theweek.com/article/index/272300/house-hunting-7-stunning-castles-in-europe<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64398_article_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?209" /></P><p ><br /><strong> Stresa, Italy.</strong> This seven-bedroom, Liberty-style residence was built in 1914 in the Piedmont region. The three-story villa has the original mosaic floors, high ceilings, a wine cellar, a gym, and a master suite with a dressing room and two bathrooms.</p><p ><br /> <br />The tower allows for 360-degree views of the area and Lake Maggiore. $8,615,000. Mayfair International, (011-39) 0323-32737.</p><p ><br /><br /> **</p><p ><br /><br /> <br /><strong>Shrewsbury, England.</strong> Sham Castle was built in 1780 for Baronet Sir Edward Smythe as a venue for entertaining. The three-bedroom residence includes a hexagonal kitchen, a cast iron and mahogany staircase, decorative...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272300/house-hunting-7-stunning-castles-in-europe">More</a>By The Week StaffSun, 23 Nov 2014 12:00:00 -0500Tips for disaster-free entertaininghttp://theweek.com/article/index/270501/tips-for-disaster-free-entertaininghttp://theweek.com/article/index/270501/tips-for-disaster-free-entertaining<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63687_article_main/w/240/h/300/move-beyond-bridget-jones-level-cooking-disasters.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Those of us who entertain pretty much always have a few disaster stories. I'll never forget the time I spent half a day slowly simmering a pot of coq au vin for a fall dinner party only to accidentally dump an industrial-size portion of black pepper on top (curses, loose-lidded pepper container!). My poor friends suffered through their stew in sweaty silence.</p><p>Incredibly, Food &amp; Wine editor-in-chief Dana Cowin is among our ranks. In her new book, Mastering My Mistakes in the Kitchen (Ecco, $35), Cowin confesses to messing up "literally every type of food (meat, fish, chicken, bread, pie)...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270501/tips-for-disaster-free-entertaining">More</a>By Anna Watson CarlSun, 23 Nov 2014 11:00:00 -050040 percent of Jewish millennials are unaffiliated. That doesn't mean they're giving up on Judaism.http://theweek.com/article/index/272434/40-percent-of-jewish-millennials-are-unaffiliated-that-doesnt-mean-theyre-giving-up-on-judaismhttp://theweek.com/article/index/272434/40-percent-of-jewish-millennials-are-unaffiliated-that-doesnt-mean-theyre-giving-up-on-judaism<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64477_article_main/w/240/h/300/many-jewish-millennials-dont-find-solace-in-worshipping-the-same-way-their-elders-did.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p> </p><p>Every year, just before Rosh Hashanah, my Crown Heights apartment becomes a war zone.</p><p>I don't mean that a few tears are shed during a volley of invective over dinner. When the Sholklappers fight, we go to the mattresses. Heads roll.</p><p><em>It's the lamb's head or yours.</em></p><p>My husband's maternal family is Persian, and just as I've learned to crunch chelo and spice gondi, I now painstakingly prepare the massive Mizrahi Seder for Rosh Hashanah, severed heads and all. Like almost everything in Judaism, the lamb's head &mdash; a graduation from the whole fish head I've used for the past two years &mdash...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272434/40-percent-of-jewish-millennials-are-unaffiliated-that-doesnt-mean-theyre-giving-up-on-judaism">More</a>By Sonja SharpFri, 21 Nov 2014 12:21:00 -0500The myth of the stay-at-home dadhttp://theweek.com/article/index/272337/the-myth-of-the-stay-at-home-dadhttp://theweek.com/article/index/272337/the-myth-of-the-stay-at-home-dad<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64417_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-idea-of-a-mr-mom-is-still-pretty-convoluted.jpg?209" /></P><p dir="ltr">I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.</p><p dir="ltr">You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get </span><span>from</span><span> </span><span>the</span><span> </span><span>media</span><span>, including <em>The </em></span><em>New York Times</em><span> who just can't </span><span>get</span><span> </span><span>enough</span><span>. The Grey Lady's </span><span>latest</span><span> was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad Network...</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272337/the-myth-of-the-stay-at-home-dad">More</a>By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>Fri, 21 Nov 2014 09:01:00 -0500How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink sliphttp://theweek.com/article/index/272341/how-my-emergency-fund-saved-me-after-i-got-the-pink-sliphttp://theweek.com/article/index/272341/how-my-emergency-fund-saved-me-after-i-got-the-pink-slip<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64426_article_main/w/240/h/300/saving-for-a-rainy-day-proved-prescient-for-one-writer.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.</p><p>As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" &mdash; and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund.<span > </span></p><p>Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.</p><p>But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving &mdash; at least in theory...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272341/how-my-emergency-fund-saved-me-after-i-got-the-pink-slip">More</a>By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne HayesFri, 21 Nov 2014 08:43:00 -0500Don't change a thing: 8 inventions that never needed updatinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/268248/dont-change-a-thing-8-inventions-that-never-needed-updatinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/268248/dont-change-a-thing-8-inventions-that-never-needed-updating<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62744_article_main/w/240/h/300/you-havent-aged-a-day.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>If someone presented you with an original 1868 Sholes and Glidden Type-Writer, and told you to write your senior thesis using it, you'd be in for a world of pain. The speed you type with on your close-set keys would be gone, and most of your fingers would be too weak to give the keys the sharp strike they required. Plus, you couldn't even see the paper, and what was the pedal thing for? The machine you use to type today, even if it's not a computer, has been so greatly improved over the original invention that they are no longer the same device.</p><p>Constant improvement is what we do. So how amazing...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268248/dont-change-a-thing-8-inventions-that-never-needed-updating">More</a>By Therese OneillThu, 20 Nov 2014 13:50:00 -0500Ina Garten's make-ahead Thanksgiving advicehttp://theweek.com/article/index/272343/ina-gartens-make-ahead-thanksgiving-advicehttp://theweek.com/article/index/272343/ina-gartens-make-ahead-thanksgiving-advice<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64419_article_main/w/240/h/300/make-thanksgiving-a-little-less-fussy.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Pulling off a Thanksgiving dinner without your guests catching you still in your robe, maniacally stirring cranberry sauce with one hand while you stuff your bird with the other, is a level of kitchen preparedness that we all aspire to and only few achieve. The alternative to this disheveled scenario &mdash; welcoming your guests fully dressed and groomed and surrounded by an aura of pleasant smells &mdash; usually looks something like Ina Garten.</p><p><br /></p><p>In her latest book, <em>Make It Ahead</em>, Ina has a whole slew of day- or week- or morning-before recipes to make us all look a little more put-together...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/272343/ina-gartens-make-ahead-thanksgiving-advice">More</a>By Marian BullThu, 20 Nov 2014 11:54:00 -05007 tricks for getting the most out of your credit card pointshttp://theweek.com/article/index/271848/7-tricks-for-getting-the-most-out-of-your-credit-card-pointshttp://theweek.com/article/index/271848/7-tricks-for-getting-the-most-out-of-your-credit-card-points<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64227_article_main/w/240/h/300/make-sure-you-actually-need-purchases-and-arent-just-buying-for-the-thrill-of-more-points.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Michelle Schroeder knows how to make the most of her money.</p><p>Not only did the 25-year-old from St. Louis finish her undergraduate degree in just two and a half years, but she also bought her first house at 20 &mdash; thanks to the savings she and her husband built up from working full-time in college.</p><p>So it's no surprise that when she heard friends talk about redeeming their credit card points for free trips to Europe, the fiscally responsible overachiever wasted no time signing up for a rewards card of her own.</p><p>"I've always had good credit, and I pay my card balance in full each month," she...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/271848/7-tricks-for-getting-the-most-out-of-your-credit-card-points">More</a>By Meghan RabbittThu, 20 Nov 2014 09:11:00 -050010 sweet and savory pancake recipeshttp://theweek.com/article/index/271788/10-sweet-and-savory-pancake-recipeshttp://theweek.com/article/index/271788/10-sweet-and-savory-pancake-recipes<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64202_article_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>The pancake is a blank slate for creativity &mdash; a stackable canvas open to adaptation. And whether you decide to give your flapjacks some heat, a hint of lavender, or a layer of scallions, your pancakes will reflect your artistic mood.</p><p>As a tribute to the pancake, we have compiled 10 recipes that will get your creative juices flowing. And who knows? You may find yourself in the mood to sing out loud or gather your paint brushes while you're at it.</p><p>Lemony cream cheese pancakes with blueberries by ENunn</p><p><br /></p><p> </p><p>Multi-layered scallion pancakes by Mandy@ Lady and Pups</p><p><br /></p><p> </p><p>Yogurt pancakes with...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/271788/10-sweet-and-savory-pancake-recipes">More</a>By Jahmekya BirhanWed, 19 Nov 2014 15:11:00 -0500How to be charismatic, according to sciencehttp://theweek.com/article/index/271681/how-to-be-charismatic-according-to-sciencehttp://theweek.com/article/index/271681/how-to-be-charismatic-according-to-science<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0128/64195_article_main/w/240/h/300/political-party-aside-each-president-exuded-plenty-of-charisma.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p class="entry-title">Charisma makes a difference. It doesn't just make us like people more &mdash; charismatic leaders bring out our best and make us do better work.</p><div class="entry-content"><p >Research shows that those following charismatic leaders perform better, experience their work as more meaningful, and have more trust in their leaders than those following effective but noncharismatic leaders.</p><p >As Wharton School business professor Robert House notes, charismatic leaders "cause followers to become highly committed to the leader's mission, to make significant personal sacrifices, and to perform above and beyond the call of duty." [...</p></div> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/271681/how-to-be-charismatic-according-to-science">More</a>By Eric BarkerWed, 19 Nov 2014 09:13:00 -0500