The Week: Most Recent Lifestyle Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/lifestyleMost recent posts.en-usThu, 24 Apr 2014 12:34:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Lifestyle Posts from THE WEEKThu, 24 Apr 2014 12:34:00 -0400Why you're probably drinking your beer all wronghttp://theweek.com/article/index/260424/why-youre-probably-drinking-your-beer-all-wronghttp://theweek.com/article/index/260424/why-youre-probably-drinking-your-beer-all-wrong<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59110_article_main/w/240/h/300/drinking-buddies-not-included.jpg?204" /></P><p class="p1">There's a popular bar in my neighborhood that is perfectly passable except for the fact that it serves beer in plastic cups. Not the flimsy red cups native to every college party, but the sort you'd expect to find at a local Salvation Army or a barbecue joint; opaque and pebbled, in mismatched colors. Sort of like this.</p><p class="p1">Is it whimsical and fun? Maybe to some (this bar is in Brooklyn, after all). But to even a casual beer enthusiast, the practice should be verboten.</p><p class="p1">The characteristics of various beer styles are best displayed, and enjoyed, in a range of beer glasses, each tailored to showcase...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260424/why-youre-probably-drinking-your-beer-all-wrong">More</a>By <a href="/author/jon-terbush" ><span class="byline">Jon Terbush</span></a>Thu, 24 Apr 2014 12:34:00 -0400Everything you need for a diner-style dinner partyhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260318/everything-you-need-for-a-diner-style-dinner-partyhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260318/everything-you-need-for-a-diner-style-dinner-party<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59059_article_main/w/240/h/300/put-the-party-back-in-dinner-party.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Some dinner parties are born of a desire for elegance, for entertainment, for opulence. Some are themed around something ridiculous, like eating whole fish with your hands while drinking out of a pineapple.</p><p>And some happen because you want to eat fries for dinner.</p><p>Here's how my mind works: I wanted fries for dinner. I wanted to dip those fries into things that taste good. Ketchup? Yes. Sriracha mayonnaise? Yes. Ice cream floats? Yes. Oh, I used to do that at the Sherwood Diner after tennis matches in high school, in the early spring when the air felt electric and I wore thick, white sweatbands...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260318/everything-you-need-for-a-diner-style-dinner-party">More</a>By Brette WarshawThu, 24 Apr 2014 11:09:00 -0400How my boyfriend and I learned to live on one incomehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260371/how-my-boyfriend-and-i-learned-to-live-on-one-incomehttp://theweek.com/article/index/260371/how-my-boyfriend-and-i-learned-to-live-on-one-income<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59081_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-shopping-sprees-will-have-to-go-on-hold.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>In the 14 years I've been with my boyfriend, Nick, we've weathered a lot of storms &mdash; from my parents' divorce to paying off $50,000 of debt.</p><p>Nick and I started dating in 1999 as poor 19-year-old college students. We didn't know anything about managing money at the time, but we learned together. After graduation, we both found full-time jobs, in finance for me and in IT for Nick.</p><p>Living off two full-time incomes was a huge change from being broke undergrads. We opened a joint bank account and finally started to live comfortably. We moved into a convenient (read: expensive) downtown apartment...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260371/how-my-boyfriend-and-i-learned-to-live-on-one-income">More</a>By Tahnya KristinaThu, 24 Apr 2014 09:19:00 -0400How to make perfect fried rice in 6 easy stepshttp://theweek.com/article/index/260316/how-to-make-perfect-fried-rice-in-6-easy-stepshttp://theweek.com/article/index/260316/how-to-make-perfect-fried-rice-in-6-easy-steps<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59057_article_main/w/240/h/300/yum.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p class="p1">Fried rice is a wildly popular takeout choice, often served with lunch specials and always ordered by a friend of mine, who shall go unnamed. But fried rice is the last thing on the menu I'd order when dining out, for one reason: It's so very simple to make at home. After a quick dig in the fridge for cooked rice, last night's leftovers, and whatever treasures lurk in back, everything comes together in less than 20 minutes.</p><p class="p1">Just about anything can go into fried rice: leftover roast chicken, grilled steak, ham, and fresh or frozen vegetables. Just don't use super "wet" leftovers, like a curry...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260316/how-to-make-perfect-fried-rice-in-6-easy-steps">More</a>By Pat TanumihardjaWed, 23 Apr 2014 08:20:00 -0400How to be a zen master at your next performance reviewhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259260/how-to-be-a-zen-master-at-your-next-performance-reviewhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259260/how-to-be-a-zen-master-at-your-next-performance-review<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58608_article_main/w/240/h/300/dont-go-on-the-defensive-and-file-away-fixes-to-implement.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p class="entry-title">Nothing can improve your performance like solid feedback can. However, none of us likes being criticized, judged, or told what to do. And our first instinct is usually to ignore feedback or even do the opposite. I never said life was simple, folks.</p><p class="entry-title">Dan Coyle, author of <em>The Talent Code</em>, and Cal Newport, author of <em>So Good They Can't Ignore You</em>, both consider feedback essential to peak performance. Merely being the kind of person who seeks out feedback is linked to many good things like higher job satisfaction and creativity. And people who specifically seek out <em>negative</em> feedback do better on performance...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259260/how-to-be-a-zen-master-at-your-next-performance-review">More</a>By Eric BarkerWed, 23 Apr 2014 07:12:00 -04007 steps to cleaning even the most cluttered closethttp://theweek.com/article/index/260248/7-steps-to-cleaning-even-the-most-cluttered-closethttp://theweek.com/article/index/260248/7-steps-to-cleaning-even-the-most-cluttered-closet<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59031_article_main/w/240/h/300/its-time-to-let-go-of-some-stuff.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>April showers bring May flowers &mdash; and plenty of rainy days spent indoors. What better way to channel your drizzly weather restlessness than to tackle some much-needed spring cleaning? After all, there's nothing like being forced to stare at your own clutter to spur you into action.</p><p>One of the toughest organizational projects is, of course, your closet. Whether you're working with a small space, funky layout or too many items you swear you'll wear <em>someday</em>, figuring out what to keep, what to toss, and what to buy more of is a challenge many would prefer to forgo altogether.<span > </span></p><p>And not only...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260248/7-steps-to-cleaning-even-the-most-cluttered-closet">More</a>By Natasha BurtonTue, 22 Apr 2014 09:00:00 -0400The most expensive properties in 11 special edition Monopoly gameshttp://theweek.com/article/index/260230/the-most-expensive-properties-in-11-special-edition-monopoly-gameshttp://theweek.com/article/index/260230/the-most-expensive-properties-in-11-special-edition-monopoly-games<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0118/59011_article_main/w/240/h/300/sorry-boardwalk-youre-no-monopoly-of-valuable-property.jpg?204" /></P><p>The board spaces on the original Monopoly game were based on locations in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Through the game, the hoity-toitiest spots for property development, Boardwalk and Park Place, came to symbolize the uppermost reaches of real estate value. Since Parker Brothers (and later, Hasbro) began licensing the game for alternate versions, there have been hundreds of Monopoly offshoots and they all have to pick something to serve as their own Boardwalk and Park Place. If it's a city, they will usually correspond to the fanciest intersection. If it's a country, they'll be the two most powerful...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260230/the-most-expensive-properties-in-11-special-edition-monopoly-games">More</a>By <a href="/author/arika-okrent" ><span class="byline">Arika Okrent</span></a>Tue, 22 Apr 2014 06:18:00 -0400The flying fire-breathing dragonhttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/260124/the-flying-fire-breathing-dragonhttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/260124/the-flying-fire-breathing-dragon<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58980_flipbook_main/w/240/h/300/this-could-be-yours-for-a-cool-60000.jpg?204" /></P><p>Hammacher Schlemmer is now selling "one of the most insane remote-controlled flying machines" ever made, said Dave LeClair at <em>Gizmag</em>. Forget about airplanes or helicopters. The Flying Fire-Breathing Dragon ($60,000) is a mechanical beast with a 9-foot wing span, and it breathes flames that travel up to 3 feet. The dragon can reach 70 mph during flights lasting a maximum of about 10 minutes. The eyes glow red while the head rotates in the direction of each turn. The turbine engine in the creature's chest runs on jet fuel or kerosene.</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/flipbook/260124/the-flying-fire-breathing-dragon">More</a>By The Week StaffSat, 19 Apr 2014 15:00:00 -0400How to cook like a Game of Thrones characterhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260074/how-to-cook-like-a-game-of-thrones-characterhttp://theweek.com/article/index/260074/how-to-cook-like-a-game-of-thrones-character<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58961_article_main/w/240/h/300/itll-benbspthis-good.jpg?204" /></P><p><br /></p><p>We have a confession to make. For all our talk of warm-weather eating, we're about to break our cardinal food rule: forget those sunny pastas and springtime veggies &mdash; this weekend, we feast like winter is coming. Because if there's any excuse to part with your seasonal sensibility, it's the latest episode of <em>Game of Thrones</em>.</p><p>After the Red Wedding last summer, there's no telling what might happen. Invasion from the north? Revenge of the Starks? (Okay, definitely revenge.) Whatever lies ahead, you can't face it on an empty stomach, so we rounded up the essential dishes for a Westeros-worthy...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/260074/how-to-cook-like-a-game-of-thrones-character">More</a>By Lisa SivaFri, 18 Apr 2014 13:00:00 -0400House hunting: 7 fantastic homes under $1 millionhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259669/house-hunting-7-fantastic-homes-under-1-millionhttp://theweek.com/article/index/259669/house-hunting-7-fantastic-homes-under-1-million<img src="http://media.theweek.com/img/dir_0117/58771_article_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?204" /></P><p ><br /><strong> Independence, Minn.</strong> This four-bedroom house is set on 10 wooded acres on the edge of a wetland. Interior features include hardwood floors, vaulted ceilings, an exercise room, and three fireplaces.</p><p ><br /> <br />More than 100 windows and a deck allow for expansive views of the property. $849,000. Zinn Family Realtors, Coldwell Banker Burnet, (952) 474-4444.</p><p ><br /><br /> **</p><p ><br /><br /> <br /><strong>Charles Town, W. Va.</strong> Happy Retreat, built in 1780, was once the home of Col. Charles Washington, George's younger brother. Buildings on the six-acre lot include an eight-bedroom manor house, a smokehouse, and an octagonal wooden schoolhouse. The...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/259669/house-hunting-7-fantastic-homes-under-1-million">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 18 Apr 2014 11:00:00 -0400