The Week: Most Recent Lifestyle Postshttps://theweek.com/section/index/lifestyleMost recent posts.en-usWed, 17 Sep 2014 10:31:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Lifestyle Posts from THE WEEKWed, 17 Sep 2014 10:31:00 -0400Your 2-year-old doesn't need to go to schoolhttp://theweek.com/article/index/268187/your-2-year-old-doesnt-need-to-go-to-schoolhttp://theweek.com/article/index/268187/your-2-year-old-doesnt-need-to-go-to-school<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62711_article_main/w/240/h/300/getting-a-lot-of-good-work-done-here.jpg?209" /></P><p>Kids cost a lot of money &mdash; $500,000 on average, <em>excluding</em> college tuition. That's a 25 percent increase since the 1960s. And partly to blame is the spiking costs of childcare and education, which used to make up 2 percent of the total cost, but now make up 18 percent.</p><p class="p2"><span class="s4">This high price tag is a big part of why today's parents, referred to by one researcher as "Generation Squeeze,"</span><span class="s5"> </span><span class="s4">are stressed out and struggling.</span><span class="s4"> No wonder the generation below them </span><span class="s4">is planning on foregoing parenthood altogether.</span></p><p class="p1">So, all things considered, why are more and more parents sending their kids off to school at 2...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/268187/your-2-year-old-doesnt-need-to-go-to-school">More</a>By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:31:00 -0400How I dug myself out of debt -- and stayed that wayhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267830/how-i-dug-myself-out-of-debt--and-stayed-that-wayhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267830/how-i-dug-myself-out-of-debt--and-stayed-that-way<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62561_article_main/w/240/h/300/sticking-to-a-budget-can-be-tough-but-its-a-solid-way-to-get-out-of-debt.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>These days taking on debt has practically become a rite of passage.</p><p>After all, building credit early can be one of the keys to financial success &mdash; or so we tell ourselves when we eagerly sign up for new credit cards and then start swiping with abandon.</p><p>So it's no surprise that the average American household has racked up over $7,000 of credit card debt.</p><p>Add in car payments, student loans, mortgages, and other loans, and you've got a recipe for debt disaster &mdash; the very predicament that the three people we'll introduce you to found themselves in years ago.</p><p>But instead of throwing...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267830/how-i-dug-myself-out-of-debt--and-stayed-that-way">More</a>By Meghan RabbittWed, 17 Sep 2014 08:25:00 -0400I'm not a parrot. So don't call me exotic.http://theweek.com/article/index/267794/im-not-a-parrot-so-dont-call-me-exotichttp://theweek.com/article/index/267794/im-not-a-parrot-so-dont-call-me-exotic<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62538_article_main/w/240/h/300/exotic-parrots-sure-exotic-people-not-so-much.jpg?209" /></P><p>It's astounding how one word can ruin your day.</p><p>Back in late August, I was sitting in the park with two friends, one blonde and one brunette. They're both white. A man approached us: "Are you ladies friends?" We smiled and nodded curtly, hoping he'd leave us alone. Wishful thinking. Instead, he proceeded to tell us how we each embodied a specific stereotype. He turned to the blonde and said, "I bet you're the fun one." He turned to the brunette and said, "I bet you're the responsible one." Finally, he turned to me: "And you're the exotic one."</p><p>The exotic one. Of course. I had to muster everything...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267794/im-not-a-parrot-so-dont-call-me-exotic">More</a>By Sabrina ImblerWed, 17 Sep 2014 07:01:00 -040011 weeknight dinners you can make without a recipehttp://theweek.com/article/index/267550/11-weeknight-dinners-you-can-make-without-a-recipehttp://theweek.com/article/index/267550/11-weeknight-dinners-you-can-make-without-a-recipe<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62426_article_main/w/240/h/300/quick-easy-and-good.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Some weeknight evenings, you get home and just want to throw a meal together. No cookbooks, no searching for recipes that you have all of the ingredients for already, no trying to divide measurements so that the dinner serves one instead of six. Just a plain and simple thrown-together meal.</p><p>While just winging it can be exciting and adventurous, having a little guidance before you whip something up can be super helpful. So, we've gathered some easy, recipe-less meal ideas to be your guide to tonight's dinner. Grab a glass of your favorite drink and have fun with your recipe-free cooking.</p><p>Veggie...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267550/11-weeknight-dinners-you-can-make-without-a-recipe">More</a>By Hollis MillerTue, 16 Sep 2014 16:00:00 -0400Why gay people of color are still losinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/267283/why-gay-people-of-color-are-still-losinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/267283/why-gay-people-of-color-are-still-losing<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62319_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-lgbt-community-has-come-a-long-way-but-it-still-has-inclusion-issues-to-address.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>"And then he told me that I'm cute, for an Asian."</p><p>I'd just met the guy who said this to me. It was a Tuesday night, when many a gay at Oxford go to club Baby Love for its weekly GLBT night. Though he was then a stranger, we had one obvious thing in common, beyond our sexuality: We're both people of color. But that was more than enough for us to strike up a friendship. Gay men are eager to scoot over and offer their own a seat at the table. This stranger and I knew, however, that being white is a big help.</p><p>Right now you're slapping your head, asking, "Seriously? In one of the most enduring...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267283/why-gay-people-of-color-are-still-losing">More</a>By Brandon TensleyTue, 16 Sep 2014 09:43:00 -0400Do you need to be crazy to be the best?http://theweek.com/article/index/266853/do-you-need-to-be-crazy-to-be-the-besthttp://theweek.com/article/index/266853/do-you-need-to-be-crazy-to-be-the-best<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62127_article_main/w/240/h/300/jobs-may-have-had-obsessive-tendencies-but-thats-not-what-he-was-known-for.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Ten thousand hours is a lot of hours. </span>A <em>crazy</em> amount of hours<span>, one might say.</p><p>I've posted a lot about "deliberate practice" and the work habits of geniuses. They're relentless.</p><p >"Sooner or later," Pritchett writes, "the great men turn out to be all alike. They never stop working. They never lose a minute. It is very depressing." [<em>Daily Rituals: How Artists Work</em>]</p><p>Here's the question: </span><span>Is that just something that obsessed, crazy people do? Does this prove the often-theorized connection between genius and insanity?</p><p>We assume 10,000 hours of practice means passion or dedication. How often does...</p></span> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/266853/do-you-need-to-be-crazy-to-be-the-best">More</a>By Eric BarkerTue, 16 Sep 2014 09:26:00 -0400In defense of family dinnerhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267995/in-defense-of-family-dinnerhttp://theweek.com/article/index/267995/in-defense-of-family-dinner<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62638_article_main/w/240/h/300/you-dont-have-to-get-this-traditional-about-it-mdash-just-sit-down-to-dinner-as-a-family.jpg?209" /></P><p>Family dinner is an intractable problem, one that many mothers have longed to get around for decades. After all, families need to eat dinner every night. And someone needs to make it.</p><p>Enter frozen dinners, Rachael Ray's 30 minute-meals, take-out, and other such shortcuts that have served as the silent heroes of women's liberation.</p><p dir="ltr">But in the last decade, the movement to return to simpler, less-processed foods has reestablished the pressure for parents (mostly mothers) to get back in the kitchen and slow simmer a stew. That many find this pressure to be a burden should come as no surprise.</p><p dir="ltr">A...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267995/in-defense-of-family-dinner">More</a>By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>Tue, 16 Sep 2014 06:09:00 -040010 common conversions for everyday cookinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/264927/10-common-conversions-for-everyday-cookinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/264927/10-common-conversions-for-everyday-cooking<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0122/61247_article_main/w/240/h/300/these-hacks-will-work-in-a-pinch.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p><span >Exactitude in the kitchen can be very satisfying, like filling in perfectly dark bubbles on a standardized test &mdash; it indulges the Type A rule follower in all of us. However, for the times when you a) don't want to get your teaspoon dirty yet again, b) are throwing exactitude to the wind, or c) just don't </span><em >feel </em><span >like measuring, you can often estimate instead.</span></p><div class="editors-post-body"><p>Cooking with estimated measurements can be freeing and just a little dangerous &mdash; you are, after all, taking a risk in the kitchen. But they will help you in a pinch, and turn you into a more confident cook in the process. Be...</p></div> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/264927/10-common-conversions-for-everyday-cooking">More</a>By Catherine LambMon, 15 Sep 2014 14:47:00 -040013 Urban Outfitters controversieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/220370/13-urban-outfitters-controversieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/220370/13-urban-outfitters-controversies<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62684_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-young-hipster-shopping-mecca-urban-outfitters-offends-yet-again.jpg?209" /></P><p>Over the years, Urban Outfitters, a store aimed at young hipsters and owned by big-time conservative donor Richard Hayne, has managed to offend blacks, Jews, Native Americans, liberals, conservatives, and eating-disorder awareness groups, among others. Here, a look at 12 of Urban Outfitters' biggest controversies:</p><p class="p1"><strong>1.</strong> <strong>A "vintage," faux-bloodstained Kent State </strong><strong>Sweatshirt<br /></strong>In September 2014, Urban Outfitters was charged with exploring "the outer reaches of bad taste" after selling what seemed to be a faux blood-spattered "Vintage Kent State Sweatshirt" for $129. The sweatshirt was widely interpreted...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/220370/13-urban-outfitters-controversies">More</a>By The Week StaffMon, 15 Sep 2014 10:10:00 -0400Everything you need to master Chinese cookinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/267783/everything-you-need-to-master-chinese-cookinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/267783/everything-you-need-to-master-chinese-cooking<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0125/62523_article_main/w/240/h/300/everything-you-need-to-get-started.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>So you want to start cooking Chinese food at home? Good plan! Your hand-crafted dan dan noodles are definitely going to taste better than the takeout junk you've been eating in shame. The first step, like any adventure, is proper outfitting. It's worth it to invest in all of the tools and ingredients for mastering Chinese cuisine from the get-go. You'll have everything you need to practice cooking at your fingertips and you'll be hosting Chinese banquet dinners in no time flat. Here's where to start.</p><p><strong>1. Dark soy sauce</strong><br />Dark soy sauce is richer, thicker and less salty than regular soy sauce. It...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/267783/everything-you-need-to-master-chinese-cooking">More</a>By Nadia ChaudhurySun, 14 Sep 2014 14:00:00 -0400