The Week: Most Recent Lifestyle Postshttp://theweek.com/section/index/lifestyleMost recent posts.en-usTue, 21 Oct 2014 17:37:00 -0400http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Lifestyle Posts from THE WEEKTue, 21 Oct 2014 17:37:00 -0400How to make corn dogshttp://theweek.com/article/index/270275/how-to-make-corn-dogshttp://theweek.com/article/index/270275/how-to-make-corn-dogs<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63621_article_main/w/240/h/300/hot-dog.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Correct me if I'm wrong, but the corn dog needs no introduction. He's classic, he's fun, he's always excited. There's nothing to be taken too seriously here, folks, and luckily the process of making your own isn't too serious either. It's simply a matter of whipping up a basic cornmeal batter, using it to coat your wiener of choice, and then deep-frying it. The oil's gotta be deep &mdash; really deep. And listen, I've never been the hugest fan of getting a deep fry setup going because things tend to get kind of sloppy, so when I do, you know it's worth it.</p><p>This is a recipe for a basic and delicious...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270275/how-to-make-corn-dogs">More</a>By Molly YehTue, 21 Oct 2014 17:37:00 -0400How to show your money who's bosshttp://theweek.com/article/index/269897/how-to-show-your-money-whos-bosshttp://theweek.com/article/index/269897/how-to-show-your-money-whos-boss<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0126/63429_article_main/w/240/h/300/it-doesnt-have-to-be-so-scary-out-therenbsp.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>There are many parts of our lives where self-help gurus urge us to feel empowered: our careers. Our relationships. Our workouts.</p><p>But there's one key thing that's often missing from the list: our money.</p><p>And Americans could certainly use some help feeling less anxious in that arena. According to a recent poll from the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, a whopping 79 percent of people say financial concerns keep them up at night &mdash; far outpacing worries over the state of their marriages, job security or children.</p><p>This statistic tells us one thing: We could all stand to take more...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/269897/how-to-show-your-money-whos-boss">More</a>By Marianne HayesMon, 20 Oct 2014 14:07:00 -0400Here's a sweet-hot chile sauce that's got it allhttp://theweek.com/article/index/269624/heres-a-sweet-hot-chile-sauce-thats-got-it-allhttp://theweek.com/article/index/269624/heres-a-sweet-hot-chile-sauce-thats-got-it-all<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0126/63342_article_main/w/240/h/300/pow.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Chef and restaurateur Ford Fry of The Optimist and King + Duke in Atlanta appreciates a good contrast between heat and sweetness in his food. So when he discovered a sweet-hot Thai chile paste atop an otherwise simple boiled chicken dish at a food truck in Portland, Oregon, he knew he was halfway to something special.</p><p>(<strong>More from <em>Tasting Table</em>:</strong> How you like pilau?)</p><p>Fry found the paste &mdash; <em>nam prik pao</em> &mdash; in an Asian market and started adding other classic Thai flavors like fresh chiles, lime juice, fish sauce, vinegar, lemongrass and Thai basil to it to make a special sauce of his own...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/269624/heres-a-sweet-hot-chile-sauce-thats-got-it-all">More</a>By Jacqueline RaposoMon, 20 Oct 2014 11:08:00 -0400Why I quit my corporate job to become a work-from-home dadhttp://theweek.com/article/index/270050/why-i-quit-my-corporate-job-to-become-a-work-from-home-dadhttp://theweek.com/article/index/270050/why-i-quit-my-corporate-job-to-become-a-work-from-home-dad<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63505_article_main/w/240/h/300/working-from-home-offers-more-facetime-with-the-kids.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Five years ago I was thriving as a corporate communications director at a mobile-tech start-up in Silicon Valley. As the sole breadwinner in my family, my six-figure salary supported my wife, Janet,* and our two kids, Ben* and Sarah,* who were 11 and 9 at the time, respectively.</p><p>We didn't live large or spend carelessly, but we had a comfortable life. We had a nice home in the Bay Area suburbs. We could afford private school and after-school activities for the kids. And we were still able to save money.</p><p>But being comfortable came with a price. I worked long, demanding hours &mdash; it wasn't...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270050/why-i-quit-my-corporate-job-to-become-a-work-from-home-dad">More</a>By Scott Diaz*, as told to Marianne HayesSun, 19 Oct 2014 11:00:00 -0400'Bury' your pet in spacehttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/269984/bury-your-pet-in-spacehttp://theweek.com/article/flipbook/269984/bury-your-pet-in-space<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0126/63468_flipbook_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1"><span class="s1">At last, the remains of a pet can be blasted into space. Celestis, which has been doing the same for human remains since 1997, now offers four ways to provide Mittens with a big send-off, said Isha Aran at <em>Jezebel</em>. For $12,500, Celestis will put a lock of hair or a gram of ashes in a small capsule and send it to the moon or deep space. For $4,995, the capsule will be sent into orbit around Earth and will vaporize like a shooting star as it re-enters the atmosphere. For $995, the capsule will be launched just high enough to experience zero gravity &mdash; and you can have it back.</span></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/flipbook/269984/bury-your-pet-in-space">More</a>By The Week StaffSat, 18 Oct 2014 16:00:00 -0400House hunting: 6 stunning historic conversionshttp://theweek.com/article/index/269962/house-hunting-6-stunning-historic-conversionshttp://theweek.com/article/index/269962/house-hunting-6-stunning-historic-conversions<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0126/63452_article_main/w/240/h/300.jpg?209" /></P><p ><br /><strong> Lyme, Connecticut.</strong> Set on 4.95 acres, this four-bedroom house was originally a blacksmith's shop from 1750 built in New Hampshire. During the 1980s, it was relocated to the current property and rebuilt as a modern home.</p><p ><br /> <br /> In 2010, the home underwent another rehab, with amenities including a first-floor master, exposed beams, a walled rose garden, and a cathedral-ceiling kitchen with a fireplace. $1,750,000. Jane Macy Pfeffer, William Pitt/Sotheby's International Realty, (860) 227-6634.</p><p ><br /><br /> **</p><p ><br /><br /> <br /><strong>St. Johnsville, New York.</strong> Built in 1835, this four-bedroom former grist mill on an inlet of the Mohawk...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/269962/house-hunting-6-stunning-historic-conversions">More</a>By The Week StaffSat, 18 Oct 2014 14:00:00 -0400Mario Batali's 6 essential tools for cooking pastahttp://theweek.com/article/index/270067/mario-batalis-6-essential-tools-for-cooking-pastahttp://theweek.com/article/index/270067/mario-batalis-6-essential-tools-for-cooking-pasta<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0127/63508_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-perfect-pasta-comes-from-the-perfect-kitchen-tools.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>When you taste perfectly cooked and dressed pasta, you instantly understand why Italy is such a great place to eat. Italian cooking and eating is well-conceived and well-executed, but it doesn't have to be confined to Italy. With the proper tools, the pastas of Bologna are not hard to replicate in almost any kitchen.</p><center><br /></center><p>Italians like their pasta <em>al dente</em> &mdash; that is, toothsome &mdash; and just barely sauced. The secret to great pasta is the balance between the pasta and the condiment. Try holding back on the sauce, and let the deliciousness of the noodle sing.</p><p><strong>Here are the six tools you...</strong></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/270067/mario-batalis-6-essential-tools-for-cooking-pasta">More</a>By Mario BataliFri, 17 Oct 2014 09:09:00 -0400The ancient clich&eacute; that can actually improve your modern lifehttp://theweek.com/article/index/266834/the-ancient-clich-that-can-actually-improve-your-modern-lifehttp://theweek.com/article/index/266834/the-ancient-clich-that-can-actually-improve-your-modern-life<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0124/62115_article_main/w/240/h/300/end-the-confusion.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p><strong>"Know thyself"</strong></p><p>The Oracle at Delphi said "Know thyself." And that is deep and profound.</p><p>It's also a pain in the ass because as with every cliche, the difficulty is in the execution and nobody ever bothers to tell you how to do it properly.</p><p>I guess they're too busy brainstorming new fortune cookie wisdom while we sit around thinking they're smart for coming up with it and we're dumb for not being able to follow through.</p><p>Knowing yourself is the hardest thing in the world because<strong> nobody lies to you about you more than you do</strong>.</p><p>We need answers. Good answers. Ones we can achieve simply &mdash...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/266834/the-ancient-clich-that-can-actually-improve-your-modern-life">More</a>By Eric BarkerFri, 17 Oct 2014 08:58:00 -0400How to make the most of your slow cookerhttp://theweek.com/article/index/269869/how-to-make-the-most-of-your-slow-cookerhttp://theweek.com/article/index/269869/how-to-make-the-most-of-your-slow-cooker<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0126/63410_article_main/w/240/h/300/slow-your-kitchen-roll.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>Weeknights weren&rsquo;t made for slow braises and roasts; they're often too harried and hectic for anything other than what's quick and easy. After a long day, you're likely to turn to a simple pasta or a hearty salad &mdash; even a sandwich qualifies as dinner when you're exhausted. But in the chilly days ahead, you may find yourself craving the comfort of a lazy slow cooked meal &mdash; the kind that's reserved for weekends &mdash; in the middle of the week.</p><p>Enter the slow cooker &mdash; the saving grace of weeknight dinners. Throw all of your ingredients into a pot in the morning, and dinner...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/269869/how-to-make-the-most-of-your-slow-cooker">More</a>By Sheela Prakash Thu, 16 Oct 2014 16:34:00 -0400A brief, scandalous history of high heelshttp://theweek.com/article/index/269986/a-brief-scandalous-history-of-high-heelshttp://theweek.com/article/index/269986/a-brief-scandalous-history-of-high-heels<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0126/63470_article_main/w/240/h/300/in-the-beginning.jpg?209" /></P><p><br /></p><p>America's baroness of burlesque, Dita Von Teese, once said, "Heels and red lipstick will put the fear of God into people." It's a formidable quote that evokes a familiar image seen countless times in fashion magazines and Hollywood movies. It also attributes a great deal of power to a piece of footwear.</p><p>Last month, the Brooklyn Museum launched a new exhibit called <em>Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe</em>, which deems the item "fashion's most provocative accessory." Spanning the course of several centuries &mdash; "from sixteenth-century Venetian platforms to twenty-first-century Christian...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/269986/a-brief-scandalous-history-of-high-heels">More</a>By Paul HiebertThu, 16 Oct 2014 08:58:00 -0400